MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

PG and laminitis?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » PG and laminitis? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Terri Berwanger
Breeding Stock
Username: Terrib

Post Number: 118
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Wednesday, August 09, 2006 - 01:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have been asked to post this by a friend who sent her mare down to stud about a month ago. Her mare was PG'd and came down with laminitis, like serious enough as well. The man who owns the stud is an equine repro specialist here in Ireland and is taking full responsiblity for the mare and her vet fees. The couple that own this mare really adore her and they are really upset. And not only that they went to visit her last week and watched as a mixture of sweet feed and beet pulp were given to her. I'm getting all this second hand from people who love their horses, but wouldn't be around horses long.
Anyway, has anyone seen this kind of thing with PG before?
Thanks
Terri
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 976
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, August 12, 2006 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am not aware of any link between prostaglandin and laminitis. Remember that the mare herself releases prostaglandin each cycle, and on top of that any injury is likely to cause a release of prostaglandin, so working on this logic, anytime anything gets injured badly it would develop laminitis...

I don't think there's a link. OTOH if the mare has newly developed laminitis, I would not be feeding grain until it's under control...
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 671
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our farrier that we use has told us that he has a handful of mares that founder or refounder after they foal every time. The owners are aware of it and have learned to work with it and treat it accordingly each year that they foal.

A drastic change in the body system can have a effect on the health of the horses feet. We have been told to look at the feet(foot) like another system in the horses body. The frog in the foot is looked at like being another heart that helps pump blood, you have a unhealthy foot all other systems will suffer too.

I know that Jos takes the safer road with folks as many do not have the knowledge to deal with proper graining, but under direct supervision of a vet/farrier/feed reps(knowledgable ones) one can feed grain with added benifits to producing a healthy foot.

Good luck
Kim
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 672
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 10:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

ps... there are many different views on this, research it and make informed choices.

Also there are many different things to start to watch for or do.

Make sure you keep the foot cool, which may mean keeping the mare standing in cool wet sand, some choose to keep them in mud (you need to watch for fungus growth too ) cool sand is good and it supports the hoof well too while there may be some changes in the hoof structure depending how bad the case may be. The mare may show some signs of abcesses in the foot. Those are best cleaned out and treated with something to kill bacteria(the smell of the abcesses are very gross after they are cleaned out-but will drastically help the horse walk better and less suffering in the long run, quicker healing time), also depending on the case, while doing farrier work, it may need to be done more often then normal,as often as every ten days to two weeks as the sole of the hoof can grow real fast after foundering. While trimming if the horse seems to be in a lot of pain walking, trimming the toe off will provide for a faster roll over and take the pain off the foot. Basically trimming a flat toe and not rounded as you would typically see. Good luck
Kim
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 982
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 10:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I believe that Terri was referencing prostaglandin rather than pregnancy when using "PG", although if I am incorrect in that I apologise, and please ignore my previous post! :-)

There really is no reason why a mare that is foaling should repeatedly founder, although if the mares are overweight a stress founder may result close to term, or if they are being over-fed because of concerns that they "need more food becuase they are eating for two". The most common cause of founder post-foaling is retained placenta. Overall, I would want to know a lot more about these mares and the management that the farrier says routinely founder following foaling - it sounds more like a management problem to me.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 673
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, August 14, 2006 - 10:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry if I read the post wrong

AS to the other mares Jos , I have no clue, I am not there, just info that had been passed down from my farriers(not backyard farriers either!) None of which are retained placenta issues. It may be a management issue, but I also know that the farrier is very well educated and has seen many many horses in their time. I just thought is was information worth sharing for filling in the back of everyones brains.
 

Terri Berwanger
Breeding Stock
Username: Terrib

Post Number: 119
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 01:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, I was refering to the drug PG, but thanks for all the information. This case is going to court actually, and not just because of the PG shot. When it's all done I will post the details, but don't want to say anything at the moment.
Thanks
Terri
 

Gail
Weanling
Username: Gail_daigle

Post Number: 25
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, August 29, 2006 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My maiden mare is 11 years old and this is her first foal. She was diagnosed from my vet with having laminitis for the first time when she was about 5 months pregnant. Working with my vet and with my Ferrier, we got it under control. The vet said it was probably from overfeeding her and the pregnancy changes she was going through. Then when she was about 8 months she started showing signs again. I started giving her the medication right away that the vet gave me and within 3 weeks it went completely away. I have grave concerns that after she foals it will come back. I was told that they frequently get laminitis after foaling. Is this true?



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US