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Need ideas on mare/weanling

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Need ideas on mare/weanling « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Carol
Yearling
Username: Rodawn

Post Number: 95
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 06:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a new-to-me mare who was weaned off her colt in September, and even though in separate pens is still calling incessantly. I'm hoping this behaviour will stop once she becomes pregnant again in the spring. My usual habit in years past with all of my other mares is that I have been able to wean their foals off, wait a couple months and then throw the fillies back in the herd again and life goes on - nobody takes up sucking again, and everyone grows up happy (I've usually had all colts sold). This mare is considerably different.

Interestingly, this mare could care less if she leaves the herd to go into the barn or go riding so does not seem to be classically herd bound. She just won't let him go (emotionally)and will stand at the fence, forsaking even food, to nicker, pine, whine for him nonstop. Enough already!

Weaning day was September 1. He took it very calmly and quietly. Mare on the other hand...

On October 4, I took him to a neighbor's house to get him off the property. He eagerly walked onto the trailer with me, happy to go to his new adventure. Mare went insane for a few hours, and then sulked for a week and quit eating anything of significance. Eventually, she settled.

Brought him home on November 30, because the neighbor really didn't want this to be a long-term thing. Mare went insane the second he stepped off the trailer, recognizing him right away, screaming, running around the field, calling, whining and pining for him. He, on the other hand, while not ignoring her (he did nicker to her), but still he was happy to walk off the trailer with me straight into his stall.

So, life at my farm, is far from peaceful. 3 months after weaning. :-( She is in one paddock. He is in a separate one, all by himself. Far from ideal. Every night, he goes inside the barn to a stall. Every night, she goes crazy, running around like a lunatic for 20 minutes before she settles for the night. Good thing we have electric fencing.

Currently, until we have a chance to re-organize our farm (as we're new to this place), the paddocks are next to each other and there are no other option for now. He's in one and she's with the mares next to it.

He's alone in his paddock. I'm trying to introduce another older mare to stay with him - one lunged at him like she wanted to kill him and did knocked him clear off his feet (nasty cow), one mare kept herding him around quite happy to drive him to exhaustion, nipping at him incessantly, and the other kept kicking out at him. I tried my 2-year-old filly, but she is pushy and bossy with him, but at least not dangerous with him, and this might end up being the best option for him for the winter.

I have to be careful with him because he has had a leg injury which is still trying to heal.

Obviously, can't put him back in with his mother, because she'll have him nursing in 2 seconds flat. :-( I'm not a happy camper.

Any ideas or experience with this sort of situation? Will she settle down when she is sent off for breeding and comes back pregnant?

For his loneliness, I've been advertising for a weanling to board with him but have no response thus far - geez, at this point, I'll offer FREE board for a weanling - I just would like him to have some company from someone his own age and size. Sadly, in farm land, everyone has their own property for their horses. As he gets bigger and older, I'm hoping the other mares' attitudes will soften toward him (not counting on it, though), but in the meantime, we need to get him through the winter in one piece.

Thoughts? All ideas appreciated, especially with regards to this problem mare.

(Message edited by rodawn on December 04, 2009)
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 2716
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, December 04, 2009 - 08:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

oh wow. Maybe sending HER away for a while will help? I have no idea....I've never had one continue for so long. I do hope someone has some answers for you, so that you may find some peace in your life! Good luck.
 

Heidi Toussaint
Neonate
Username: Hhtoussaint

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2010
Posted on Thursday, July 01, 2010 - 03:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow, this is almost exactly the same problem we are having. We separated our mare and her colt for 3 months. He has never had a problem with this, but her...
For her it was really hard. She did settle down after about a month. And after 3 months we put them back together, (in our herd). He still tries to suck milk, although she has nothing. He doesn't mind if I take her away, but she has a fit if he is out of her site, so really hard to work with.

Do I have to separate them for good in order for me to be able to work with her? I've never had this before, so not sure what to do.
 

Brenda Weddle
Weanling
Username: 3_horses

Post Number: 27
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Thursday, July 01, 2010 - 09:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a ten year old TWH mare who had a filly in Sept 2008. We let them stay together and the filly (up until she was 18 months old) would occasionally nurse for comfort. When the mare was about 6 months pregnant again, she began to refuse to let the filly nurse anymore. She still nickers to her occasionally and will follow the filly anywhere, but no more nursing! We are expecting her mule baby in August.
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 3513
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, July 02, 2010 - 12:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In my experience, if they can see and hear each other , they will continue to fret about it. If it's possible to board one of them somewhere for a month, they will finally get over it.



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