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Vaccinating in early pregnancy

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Vaccinating in early pregnancy « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Becky Schulz
Weanling
Username: Becky

Post Number: 21
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 01, 2009 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I know vaccinating mares in early pregnancy (first 90 to 120 days) is generally frowned upon, but what would be the results if you did? Early embryonic loss, fetal deformities, or? I haven't really seen that discussed anywhere.
 

Bobbi Govro
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 1289
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 01, 2009 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Becky: I sure don't know of any "issues" as a result of early vaccination (maybe lots of people of done that when they didn't even know their mares were bred...I dunno). I just think that the common practice to do full vaccinations in the last 30-45 days ensures that the mare will pass on some of the immunities to their foals. When vaccinating that early in the game, you will not pass those immunities on to your newborn foal. But, considering everyone's circumstances are different and perhaps you may be in a situation where you are not comfortable holding your mare off for that long due to possible exposure to disease, not vaccinating could risk your mare's ultimate health. I don't know that you couldn't re-vaccinate again in the last 30 days of pregnancy...something to definately ask your veterinarian. I've bought many a horse that I had no idea when or even if they were vaccinated and I always vaccinate everything new that comes to my place immediately...so far, no one ever suffered any consequences that were apparent due to a double vaccination within a year's time. Jos will probably have a much better view on that than I but in all my years of animal teching...we vaccinated dogs, cats, etc that people brought in as strays and we would have no idea of their vaccination history. Again, never had any issues that I can recall that resulted in tragedy as a result of "double dosing" vaccines within a year's time period.
 

Michele
Breeding Stock
Username: Mich

Post Number: 136
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 02, 2009 - 01:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Vaccinating mares in the 1st trimester can, as you mention, cause developmental abnormalities, and certain vaccines can induce temperature spikes which could cause abortion. This is especially so in the case of live vaccines.
The reason you don't see it discussed much is probably because this is a commonly accepted fact and vaccinating in the 1st trimester is usually avoided.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2340
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Thursday, April 02, 2009 - 03:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There isn't actually any research that I am aware of in the equine concerning vaccination in the first 90 days and potential ill-effects, or more specifically, the first 45 days during which organogenesis is occurring. There is however research in other species (notably human) of the exposure to toxins (which would include vaccinations and also deworming) during organogenesis that indicates an increased rate of pregnancy loss. It is from the other species research that people have extrapolated results for the equine. It is not going to be every toxin exposure situation that leads to pregnancy loss - and in fact it is strongly recommended that even if the mare is pregnant, if there is an outbreak of something locally against which the mare requires vaccination that she still be vaccinated - but it is a simple precaution to take if one plans ahead.
 

Becky Schulz
Weanling
Username: Becky

Post Number: 22
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 02, 2009 - 05:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for your replys. I asked because I started breeding several mares to a new stallion this spring. The mares had started cycling the week I did routine vaccinations and were bred during that time frame. If they come back in heat, no problem. If there is the potential for fetal defects, should I abort them? I also need to vaccinate for WN. If the mares are in foal, how long should I wait to do that?
 

Bobbi Govro
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 1294
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 02, 2009 - 07:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I did some research on this and I then called and asked my own equine specialty veterinarian. He basically agrees with Jos with using precautionary measures (and, I guess some of what my original thoughts were). Most typical vaccines are a killed virus with the exception of the West Nile and possibly the EVA vaccines which are typically live virus and should be avoided, if at all possible, as they have had instances of defects or illness leading to abortion in mares. But, your typical 5-Way, 6-Way, 7-Way vaccines are made and approved safe for pregnant mares as they are derived by killed virus. He agreed that if you just vaccinated for the "typical preventions" you are probably just fine. The West Nile is definately something you should hold off on until either later in pregnancy or within that last 30-45 day window before birth. He also stated that he would advise that you still give your mares a "booster" vaccine in the last 30 days prior to foaling to give those babies immunity, a second does of killed vaccine won't hurt your mare within the 12 month period.

I hope that helps. Its just one opinion.
 

Becky Schulz
Weanling
Username: Becky

Post Number: 23
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 02, 2009 - 07:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, Bobbi. I appreciate you taking the time and effort to help answer my questions.
 

Michele
Breeding Stock
Username: Mich

Post Number: 137
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Friday, April 03, 2009 - 12:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos, would you give a mare a vaccination for a specific disease during an actual outbreak? I have spoken to a couple of vets and virologists and they have recommended not giving a vaccination to any horse during outbreak time?

Becky, WRT giving vaccines the same week of covering: that apparently is not a problem according to my vet. It could be a problem in the time frame from once the conceptus has implanted though and before the end of the 1st trimester.
Some vaccines {may} only show 'side effects' 14 days post inoculation and some vaccines are in two parts i.e. you administer one first and the second one 3 weeks later.

I guess because I feel I do not want to risk anything going wrong I am not prepared to vaccinate during the first trimester at all. I don't even deworm during that time. I would prefer to either miss a season or else cover later if I was in that position.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2342
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Friday, April 03, 2009 - 12:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My actions would depend upon the individual situation. If for example, the animal was already infected, then no, I would not vaccinate; but - again depending upon disease etc. - it was an outbreak in my general area, then I probably wold vaccinate. Dr. Timoney for example recommends vaccinating even pregnant mares in the face of an EVA outbreak on the resident farm, as the risks of abortion from the vaccine are significantly lower than the risks of abortion from contracting the disease itself.
 

Michele
Breeding Stock
Username: Mich

Post Number: 138
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Friday, April 03, 2009 - 01:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jos, that makes good sense, but you would first have to check blood titres for antibodies wouldn't you? Vaccinating a horse which has already been exposed to the disease would be risky (as you allude to in your second sentence). There is a term for the result thereof which has slipped my mind at the moment..
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2344
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, April 05, 2009 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

One can over-manage! Waiting to get titre levels back before vaccinating in the face of an outbreak of something like EVA could result in enough delay to cause heartbreak - not something I'm willing to risk. :-(



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