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Mare with OCD

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Mare with OCD « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Tara Roberts
Neonate
Username: Tarar

Post Number: 3
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a mare that was just recently diagnosed with OCD. The lesion isn't very big and it is only in the one stifle. I bought her as a 2 yr old and was sound at the time. Before I got her She did have a bad tangle up in wire causing a nasty cut on her back leg(the leg the OCD is in). I can't justify the surgery for the slight possibility of her being sound as I bought her to be my performance horse. She is 4 yrs old. My question is has anyone dealt with breeding a mare with OCD and if so what were the outcomes?. I have done a lot of reading and talked to the vet and from what I understand no one really knows the cause and there is a good chance with management that the foal will be fine. I know it is an undesirable trait to take a chance with, but this is her only option.
 

Catherine Owen
Nursing Foal
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 16
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 07:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tara,
I have had a filly before with OCD. Unfortunately it can be genetic but more often than not, it is caused by mineral imbalances when a horse is growing, particularly as a very young foal.

There are the OCD pellets out there (Dr. Beebe). I have been feeding them to my "baby" (now yearling filly). Some Kentucky racehorse people swear by them, so I figure why not?

The other filly we had a while back, ended up having to have the surgery to remove the loose cartilage. The surgery did make her usuable and we went ahead an broke her out and then sold her, so we did not breed her.

One thing you might want to check out if you can is if either parents (dam and sire) of your filly have had other foals with any type of Osteochondrosis Disease. That might help you figure out if your mare's problem originated from genetics or nutrition.
 

Tara Roberts
Neonate
Username: Tarar

Post Number: 4
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 12:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The lady that owned the mother said no other foal has had any problems. Not sure about the stallion, but the offspring that I know of don't have it. I am just wondering if the main cause is from the injury causing damage to the cartilage. The vet had a really hard time finding the lesion as it is small. She also thought that some of the problem may be that her back is out. I am going to get a chiropractor to have and look and see if that makes it any different. It is weird, when she is in the field some days she is really sore and others you would never know. I will have to look into that feed. I guess I will take the chance and breed to a less expensive stud and see what happens. Do you know at what age it is normally seen as I would want to x-ray the foal before I do anything with it(ie: sell it).
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 866
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The majority of surgeries for OCD are successful and like Catherine stated most are caused by foals growing too fast with increased protein. A lot can be prevented by proper nutrition and not "pushing" the growth on a foal. Breeding to a less expensive stud isn't going to help prevent OCD, you would want to breed for the best possible to have the best future for your foal IMO. I have seen foals as young as 6 months need to decrease their food intake to help prevent OCD because they are growing too fast, this has all been under a vet's care. :-)
 

Tara Roberts
Neonate
Username: Tarar

Post Number: 5
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 05:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't plan to breed to an inexpensive stud to prevent it, just so that if the foal does get it I haven't spend a lot of money for nothing(ex:500 vs 3000). I also don't have $2000 plus to spend on surgery to have it done and there is no one anywhere near me that can do it. Thanks for the info.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 869
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 06:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OCD can be prevented by proper nutrition and it's not "genetic". Some breeds are more prone to it (like WB's) since they are big horses and tend to grow fast but just because your mare has it does not mean the foal will. I would pick the stallion you like and then feed properly, watch the growth rate of your foal and maybe talk to your vet to help prevent too much protein intake. Your foal should be fine. :-)
 

Tara Roberts
Neonate
Username: Tarar

Post Number: 6
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 06:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was baffled by the growth thing. From what I have read WB's and halter horses are what come to mind when I think of for growth, as they tend to have a lot more stress on the limbs due to weight and growth. My mare is bred to be a cutting horse and is only 14.2 and is by no means stocky. I guess how she grew must have been to fast for her own body makeup.
Thanks. I will give it a go and see how things turn out.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 871
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 09:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I bet you would be fine. The larger horses like WB's are more prone to it but technically any horse can get it from improper nutrition and too much protein. I bet that's what happened with your mare so it was more of a "freak" occurence and I bet her foals would be fine :-)
 

Mood Swings
Yearling
Username: Mood_swings

Post Number: 95
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2008 - 10:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Too much protein is not the cause of OCD. Too much starch has recently been proven as a factor. A mare in late gestation and a young growing foal needs 14 - 18% protein in their ration. Yes it can be genetic. I had a TB mare that had three foals - ALL three had OCD lesions :-(

As everyone has mentioned nutrition is vital :-) Excerice for a newborn is also important. You may never know why your filly developed OCD and her siblings are fine. You will likely be just fine with your girl :-) Good luck!
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 881
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, February 29, 2008 - 05:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've known of weanlings and yearlings that have developed OCD from growing too fast, nothing to do with the nutrients when the mare was in foal. That said, certain breeds are prone to OCD but it's not a genetic disease per say. If you had 3 foals in a row with OCD I would look at your feeding program! It can be prevented.
 

Carol
Yearling
Username: Rodawn

Post Number: 91
Registered: 05-2009
Posted on Wednesday, September 30, 2009 - 08:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is a late posting to this but I only just saw it. We just attended a seminar from a Vet visiting from Holland. He stated the genetic link comes the strongest from the stallion, but the mare must also be a carrier. The long and short of his seminar was that OCD is most definitely a heritable trait. As well, it can be caused by imbalanced feeding. He went into some depth on that too.

I have a foal this year that developed OCD at 3 months of age in his hind pastern P1/2. It has been determined to be genetic. I have had the Kentucky Equine Research go over my feeding program from top to bottom and they have found nothing wrong with my program. Since the mare has had 5 foals, none of whom ever developed the problem, it has to have come from the stallion. It is NOT caused by excessive protein. Epiphysitis can be caused by over-feeding calcium (which is very high in alfalfa hays) which imbalances the calcium:phosphorous ratios. KER has just finished a massive study of horses in Europe and the United States which interestingly found the time of feeding during pregnancy is the most important - especially when it comes to adequate copper, manganese, iron and lysine. Some elements the foal stores in the liver to use after birth. They found foals in utero with mares fed adequate amounts of copper had lower incidences of epiphysitis/physitis. After foals were born, feeding them appropriate doses of copper, calcium and phosphorous had less impact on foals developing epiphysitis/DOD/OCD, so to their study it appeared that feeding the pregnant mare was the most important preventative time.

KER recommends timothy/grass mixed hays for warmblood mares because timothy has excellent protein and nominal calcium/phosphorous, which you can then supply via the concentrates and/or broodmare mineral supplements. Warmblood mares are also recommended to be fed a high roughage, low carbohydrate, low sugar diet.

Thoroughbreds tend to handle the carbs better than warmbloods.

Check the feeding program, yes, but never dismiss the genetic link.

(Message edited by rodawn on September 30, 2009)



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