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EVA Vaccination - I CONFUWSED??!!!

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » EVA Vaccination - I CONFUWSED??!!! « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Catherine Owen
Nursing Foal
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 14
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay, here is another question. Since it has been several years since I have been in the breeding end of the equine world, there is some new stuff that I am finding out about this time around with my two new broodmares that I will be taking to Kentucky next month to the breeding farm.

I am confused about the whole EVA thing. I understand EVA is a big thing right now in KY, thus the restrictions, etc. for the stallions.

Now....what about my mares? Should I have both of them vaccinated for EVA prior to shipping them up there?

I know you have to keep them isolated from unvaccinated horses for 21 days afterward...how "isolated" is "isolated"? Not sharing water/feed buckets? Or literally NO contact?

NO contact will be hard as while all my horses have their own pasture and stall, they are side-by-side and therefore "contact" is possible; although my one little mare is sort of a loner (you've probably read about her in another thread I started about the "stud-ish" mare).

If NO contact is required what about just vaccinating my other two horses (yearling filly and 13-year-old gelding) too? Then they will all "have it". Does it harm non-breeding horses to vaccinate them or since these are non-breeding animals, don't worry about them?

A thing that is concerning me is that some countries/state/farms won't let horses in that have a positive test for the antibodies, even if that you can prove they came from the vaccination.

As a side note, the breeding farm in KY that I am shipping to says the stallion we are breeding to has been vaccinated for EVA and that vaccination of my mares is optional.

To vaccinate or not?
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 9
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 01:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My understanding is that EVA is airborn. Also the USDA requires 30 feet between quarantined horses and other horses. Plus wiping down rails etc., (white glove routine). Thats for exporting. I have a friend who has her stallion in quarantine for EVA (not exportation) right now and he is in his own pasture where by he cannot make contact (nose to nose) with any other horses. He can see them though.

Now you have me thinking. Do I need to vaccinate all my mares when I test and vaccinate my stallion for exportation?

;) S
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1728
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 05:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

EVA is primarily a respiratory disease, and can by transmitted by aerosol droplets when an acutely infected horse sneezes or coughs. A stallion that has been infected by the aerosol route may end up as a permanent shedder of the virus in his semen - note that this is the only way he will shed after he has passed through the acute stages of the disease, which last about 3 weeks. Note too, that not all stallions will shed after becoming infected.

Quarantine is not particularly arduous. Essentially an inability of the vaccinated animal to touch another animal is adequate, so a stall on the opposite side of an aisleway with solid walls is adequate. The level of quarantine suggested as required by the previous poster is unnecessary.

Do not be concerned about the "non-importation" of seropositive horses (those that show antibody presence in blood). The number of countries that will not allow a seropositive horse in based upon a blood test alone is very small (3 or 4 I think), and are not major horse breeding countries - South American, Carribean and Far Eastern countries. Note too that this restriction would only apply to stallions, not mares. Mares cannot harbour the pathogen, and will only be capable of infecting another animal during the acute stages of the disease - for about 3 weeks after initial infection.

Desire for vaccination of mares will vary depending upon what you are doing. If you are breeding to a stallion shedding the virus in his semen, vaccination is necessary or at least strongly recommended (also coupled with quarantine after the breeding as well as the vaccination). If you are breeding to a stallion of unknown status, it may also be recommended, especially if the mare once bred is going to come into contact with other susceptible animals (especially non-vaccinated pregnant mares or stallions). If you are breeding to a vaccinated and non-shedding stallion that has been boostered annually then unless your mares may come into contact with the disease elsewhere, vaccination is not necessary. Note however that if your mares are competing, or coming into contact with other animals of unknown status, then vaccination is recommended as EVA can be asymptomatic so you would not necessarily know if your mare had indeed come into contact with an infectious case at a show or elsewhere, and abortion is a potential sequela. It has come to my attention that some quarter horse stallions in particular that were vaccinated following the EVA outbreak in the QH industry 2 years ago are not being boostered annually. Unless antibody titres are checked annually to ensure that there is adequate protection to prevent infection, the possibility still exists that a non-boostered stallion could become infected and go on to shed the virus. Breeding to a stallion that has not been boostered annually after the initial vaccination, or has not had his titre levels checked annually and shown as adequate, is therefore not recommended. It also suggests that one may be dealing with someone that is unethical or uneducated when it comes to EVA.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1729
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 11:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Owing to recent heavy interest in the subject, we've just added an "EVA fact file" to the articles section (follow that link).
 

Catherine Owen
Nursing Foal
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 18
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 09:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jos!

I don't think I will vaccinate my mares. The stallion we are breeding to is up-to-date on his boosters, etc. and they haven't had a problem with him (I'm pretty certin he tested negative prior to when they began vaccinating him). These are super reputable people with a fantastic facility -- Gumz Farms (Kentucky facility) and I can't say enough good things about Amy Gumz and how great she has been to work with me so far in getting things ironed out (one of these mares was a re-breed---entirely different story and it would take an entire other thread).

My mares will just go to the farm and then come home to the broodmare pastures. My gelding and yearling filly will be up in the show barn by the time the mares get back home to my farm (providing my builder can be on time --- another long story that is a real "side-splitter" tehe tehe....). If the builder doesn't get the show barn done this spring, well I'll probably be in jail for chasing him with a gun...

But the long and the short of it, the mares will come home and stay there. They won't be going to shows, trail rides, etc.
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 10
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 09:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jos, thanks so much for the information. We have been getting all kinds of varied info and instructions regarding quarantine and vaccination. My mention of the white glove treatment was for exporting to England, not for EVA. I was using it as a comparison as I am having both done this next month for my stud. Sorry if it confused the issue or caused concern.

;) S



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