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Temporary Paralysis in mare pre and post foaling

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Temporary Paralysis in mare pre and post foaling « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 02:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Has anyone experienced these symptons in a mare prior to or after foaling.

1) becomes lame in the forward motion of the hindlegs.
2) is extremely sensitive to groin area
3) heat in hip socket area and and over lumbars
4) has bouts with ligament let down
5) when getting up from laying down a you hear loud crack sound and hind legs do not move. Horse looks like a worm with one end held motionless as she tries to get moving. Then she moves each hind leg inches and stiffly (no lifting or bending) a few inches at a time for several feet then slowly walks out of it.
6) cannot canter.

I'm desperate... 6 vets and no one has an answer. Please if someone can help me I need it soon. She has been this way for 4 months now. Her foal is 1 month old and healthy.

She retained her afterbirth for 24 hours, I had her on Oxytosin at 6 hours with one injection every two hours for three injections. She was on 3 days of 20 cc's of anitbiotics morning and night afterwards. Afterbirth was normal. She has no post discharge other than what would be normal after foaling. She appears clean now. I thinki she jsut shut down due to the pain. She's been so bad that I thought i would have to put her down abotu 2 months ago. Banamine and Bute according to her pregnancy needs are what kept her going.

Is there Symphisis Public Ligament Disfunction in mares? If you have not heard of it would you please ask around or look for any research on it? Her symptons mimmick the symptons in women who have SPD or DSPD. I am grasping at anything here. I do not know how to treat her if I can't get a diagnosis.

She was running with a young colt for ahwile about 6 months ago and was kicking alot so some kind of injury could have occured.

Bottom line she is in a lot of PAIN!!!!!

Please, I need help!

;)S
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 805
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, February 15, 2008 - 03:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, I'm an OB/GYN nurse and the first thing I thought was some type of pelvic seperation. No vets can tell? Can you get her to a specialized equine hospital? I'm so sorry to hear this, please keep us posted :-(
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 893
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, February 16, 2008 - 12:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have no ideas or sugestions but will keep both you and her in my thoughts and prayers if I come across anything ill definately post
 

Mood Swings
Yearling
Username: Mood_swings

Post Number: 89
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 - 07:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Tracy. It definately sounds like your mare has suffered a traumatic injury, perhaps she keeps dislocating something up high in her back end? If you take her to an equine hospital they will (should) have the equipment necessary to solve the mystery of your mares ailment. Best of luck!
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 833
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 20, 2008 - 09:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, any updates on your mare?
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 10:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay here is my problem. I have had 6 vets out to see her and the last round after going over the other information has agreed that she has a severe injury. I have exhausted my funds so now I am stuck and cant see a way to getting her an MRI. (I higly recommend INSURANCE). I plan to have my usual vet who is also a nutritionist and chiropractor take topside xrays to see if anything can be seen from there. As soon as I can muster it I will get her the MRI, in the mean time she healing up wrong. Its killing me.

Thanks for sharing. I still wonder though if the injury isnt to the Pubis Synphasis Ligament or pubic joint.

;) S
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 906
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Thursday, February 21, 2008 - 11:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I dislocated my hip slightly while I was prego and it kinda acted the same way as your descibing her. Of course its comparing ppl to horses but maybe its possible shes just slightly "out" in the pelvis or hip. Ill keep you in prayers
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 01:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni, See I have been studying people and SPD and she does have the same symptoms. I guess no one has ever made the comparison before.

This is the only hope I have.

;) S
 

Diana Gilger
Yearling
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 80
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 06:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, my mare does this very same thing. She is a miniature and only 28" tall, but I believe it is comparable. I ONLY notice this in her when she is in her last few weeks of pregnancy,and a few weeks after foaling. It has always looked to me like a terribly bad stifle issue...but a vet would have surely picked right up on that. Especially 6 of them. Maybe mine has been misdiagnosed...only seen by one vet, and He said, "It might look like it's in the hip...but its actually in the stifle"...To me...it's in the hip and she has the heat across her lumbar as well, so I don't know. Does your horse get better with exercise/turnout? And is it only bad after being confined or still for a while?
 

Catherine Owen
Neonate
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 6
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 11:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan,
Curious to know---how old is your mare? I didn't pick that up in the thread.

I had a little Appaloosa mare many years ago that when she got to be in her early 20's she would have "days". It was like this condition came on suddenly and just started one day.

She could hardly move, then it was like she would get a little better on about day two or three and then sort of "come out of it". Then without warning she would be back literally almost "on the floor".

It was similar to what you are describing and it would almost be like she was paralyzed on her hind end, very painful, tiny movements forward on her bad days. We had thoughts of putting the poor old girl down.

My vet back then finally diagnosed her with a type of arthritis similar to rheumatoid arthritis in people. He said the "come and go" symptoms were due to variations in the levels of inflammation. Literally she had good days and then bad ones, some very bad.

We put her on Bute which was about the only anti-inflammatory used back then (we weren't aware of the stomach problems it could cause back then, not enough studies of it yet). We also started feeding her yucca (75%) religiously. Turning her out in the pasture permanently where she could exercise at will and be able to amble around was better for her than keeping her in a stall.

She did get better and we were even able to take her off the Bute after a period of time and she never did relapse as bad as the intial onset. From time to time she would get bad enough that we would start the Bute again for a few days.

She lived for about 6 more years and finally passed away just short of her 28th birthday; and it was cancer that ended up getting her.

I know this has nothing to do with foaling, which it sounds like your poor girl may have suffered some trauma, but it is the only experience I have had with the whole "movement", or lack thereof, thing.

I hope your poor girl gets better.
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 11:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks to both of you, Diana and Chatherine for sharing. I realize now that this is probably not reproduction related. But I was going with the Symphasis Pubic Ligament Disfunction in pregnant women. Since the problem came on in Kindlewood in her 7th month of pregnancy and I had heard of mares having leg issues with pregnancy. I was hoping some progessive individual out there had considered this or seen something similar to my mares situation and could give me direction.

You both give me hope that she may be able to live her life out. She is 8 years old. She is a registered (SMR) Spanish Mustang. This is her first foal. She has been solid as a rock prior to his problem arising.

This was her yesterday.

[URL=http://s49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/?action=view&current=Feb212 008KindlewoodLame001.flv[/URL]


The lameness alternates and goes away then comes back usually after she has been lying down. When she gets up she drags her hind feet stifly until she can manage to get them moving again. Yesterday morning when I went out to feed she had dirt all over here like if she had rolled. I believe she struggled to get up. I have seen her do this many times and its heart breaking to watch.

Thanks again!

;) S
 

Catherine Owen
Neonate
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 7
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Miss Kindlewood is a beauty! Wow, what a mane and tail! That baby is just precious.

I have watched the video several times and I am wondering about a condition called "Upward Pateller Fixation".

I have seen stifle injuries in cutting, reining and working cowhorses. Kindlewood is absolutely protecting that right hind leg, no doubt.

The stifle is the horses equivalent to the human knee. It can become "locked", strained/sprained, dislocated, basically anything that can happen to the human knee.

Here is a good link about the basics of Upward Pateller Fixation:
http://petcaretips.net/horse_lameness.html

One thing this article explains rather well is how the pelvic limb can be "locked" in extension. This is possible due to the unique anatomy associated with the horse’s stifle joint.

Did any of these vets say anything about such a thing?
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 840
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Catherine. After watching that video I'm not so sure it's her hip, it does look very suspicious for a stifle injury. You guys are in my thoughts and prayers and I hope you get an answer soon :-)
 

Diana Gilger
Yearling
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 82
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 02:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I watched the video just now....looks like stifle to me.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 910
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 03:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

As she doesnt seem to have a problem bringing it forward just weight bearing I agree its probably not the hip.
can you flex her hoof without it causing pain? If so I would stretch it a bit each day to keep the muscles and tendons from contracting.
PLZ keep us posted
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 5
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am not disregarding a stifle injury - at this point I would try anything. But she does have trouble bringing the legs forward and when she does many times she raises it up to her belly. It seems easier to let the legs go out behind her. However her Suspensorary Ligaments are now inflamed so she is in a catch 22. Remember this is both legs alternately through out the day every day. Last night it was right, this morning it was left this evening it's both. I will go check out the link you shared. Maybe there is an answer hidden there somewhere.

I am trying at this time to raise money from family members for an MRI. Go get your un-insured horses INSURED! You never know what small thing can happen and end a huge outlay in order to save your best friend.

Thanks everyone!!!!

;) S

Thanks.
 

Diana Gilger
Yearling
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 83
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 06:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, as she gets up and moving can you hear popping around her hips or stifle?
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 6
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 07:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Early on when she'd get up a loud single crack could be heard, but since she foaled I have not heard the sound.

I read the knee piece from the link above and it suggested she might drag her toes etc. She stands firmly on her feet when she gets up from the ground but moves the hoof only inches at a time. I have never seen her drag the toe of her hoof. I suppose it could still be stifle related. But then why would the heat be near her hip socket (thats where she is flinchy) and also in her loins? I poked around on her stifle a little bit ago and she seem unbothered by it.

I will though start looking more specifically for stifle related soreness.

;) S

(Message edited by susancatt on February 22, 2008)

(Message edited by susancatt on February 22, 2008)
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 7
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 01:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay more info. This time it is repro related. I called my old time standby vet. Good family vet, and updated him on Kindlewoods situation. At first he seemed stumped too, and pretty much went with my lead. Then yesterday Kindlewood had a turn for the worse and was unable to walk at all. Also she had a fever and was listless when I got home from work. She had contracted Mastitis.

So more bute, hotpacks, milking, and antibiotics. Her neck was still sore from last months series of shots due to retaining her afterbirth. So over the phone the vet and I chose to wait until this morning and give her oral antibiotics. I am already feeding her a mash of millet, linseed oil, yucca, comfey and yarrow root. So why not add in anitbiotics, electrolytes and minerals? lol

Anyway. My vet began to discuss hormone inbalances possibly causing the affect of lameness and or setting up compromises that result in injury and lameness. This is the first info from all the vets that seem to go with Kindlewoods on and off symptoms.

So we are treating the mastitis and I am pretending she has ligament and bones issues. In other words I am treating her for ligament challenges. I am watching her stifles, but now that she is on bute she shows no signs of stifle problems, however she does seem sensitive in the pasterns with some heat there which could be mastitis related. I am massaging, icing and wrapping them morning and night. Once the mastitis is gone I am going to have her hormones checked. This onslot of lameness seemed to come right about the time she should be coming into her first monthly cycle. Possibly something as simple as an estrogen shot could set her on the right direction to recovery?

Any thoughts?

;) S
 

Diana Gilger
Yearling
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 91
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 08:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, it sounds like you've finally got the right vet on your side. I hope everything works out well for you and Kindlewood. I am as confused as you as far as thoughts go!
 

Catherine Owen
Nursing Foal
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 11
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 08:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan,
I don't mean to add another problem into the mix, but I would be really concerned that this mare is/has foundered now at some point? Heat in her feet and pasterns is a concern. It can also explain her total reluctance to move at all. Please be on the watch for it.

Of course, from my limited experience with mastitis, sometimes mares will just find the condition so painful that they will "lock down" too, indeed mastitis can sometimes make then try to avoid rubbing the sore teat/side and they will move really weirdly or not at all, and then some mares act like there is nothing hardly wrong. I guess like women, things affect each one differently. I know if one of my boobs was swollen, hot and super sore, I would probably be pretty pitiful too!

One question, is she letting her foal nurse at all? My understanding is that the affected milk won't really harm the foal and if she will let it nurse it will save you some milking.
But then again, now that I think about it, the baby may not need all the Bute, antibiotics, etc. Maybe you are feeding him/her replacement?

Bless your heart, I really feel for you and hope and pray everything takes a turn for the better.
Oh, and I wholeheartedly agree with you about the insurance factor. I learned that lesson last year when my baby filly cut her head pretty badly and we were at about $1,400 when all was said and done. I have now taken out a minimal mortality policy on each one of my horses so I can get the Major Medical rider for each. It runs me $1,940/year for 4 Quarter Horses (2 broodmares, 1 yearling filly, and my 13-year-old gelding). Each of them is insured for the minimum mortality amount of $2,500 (I didn't really purchase the insurance for the mortality portion of it but you have to get it in order to get the major medical attached as a rider---with Agri-Risk, anyway). Then they each have $7,500 each for Major Medical. I think it is money well spent as like I said, one cut/sew incident with my baby filly last year was $1,400.

(Message edited by cateowen on February 25, 2008)
 

Colleen Beck
Breeding Stock
Username: Gypsycreations

Post Number: 401
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 09:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Man Susan! I feel for you. I hate it when my babies are sick or injured. They just look to you to fix em and sometimes you can't. Breaks my heart. I hope and pray that you will find a solution to her problems and she will be able to get back to normal.

Insurance - we had a few insured at one point, but now that we have 17 Gypsy Cobs...I can't afford it! I am trying really hard to get my numbers down, but buyers are holding onto their money right now. The one time I really could have used it was on a newborn "dummy" foal and they wouldn't cover him anyway because he wasn't 60 days old. It ended up costing us $9000.00 and we lost the colt anyway. But if you just have a few....Insurance is the way to go!
 

Susan catt
Neonate
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 8
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 10:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Catherine, Please throw it all at me! I am here because I am baffled. This is not my first equine pregnancy. I've been a breeder most of my life and I'm reaching 54. So its not new to me. However, this mares situation is completely new to me, and aparantly new to most vets as well. So in a desperate moment I came to all of you to see if any of you have had experience with this kind of situation. So all of you are so much appreciated! You have no idea!

I have been watching for laminitis. So far her front feet have no heat in them and she is firmly on them. The back ones she sets down pretty good when she is not limping. lol ;-) But like the stifle possibilty I am not ruling anything out, and I am watching everything I can think of. If you have any other ideas or thoughts please send them my way. The most simple non-consenquentual thing may be at the root of the whole problem.

Thanks so much!!!
An thank you everyone for the warm and caring thoughts! What a great group of people!!!!!
;) S
 

Diana Gilger
Yearling
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 95
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, February 25, 2008 - 06:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, years ago, I had a friend whose mare was increasingly ill as foaling time drew near...she suffered the same type of partial paralysis and heat over various parts of her body as your mare has. She spent several thousand dollars on tests, MRIs, xrays, etc. When they had exhausted all other resources, and the mare grew continually more paralyzed and painful after the birth of the foal, they did an extensive allergy panel on the mare and found that she was allergic to her own milk that she was producing for the foal....essentially, allergic to being pregnant! They pulled the foal from the mother, bottle fed, and allowed her to dry up and she was then fine. I have never read of or heard of anything else remotely similar to this, and from what I understand it is an EXTREMELY rare condition. I cannot remember the name of the condition. But it might be something to look into. Is your foal still nursing?
 

Susan catt
Nursing Foal
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 11
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 26, 2008 - 10:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Very interesting Diana, I have heard of horses being allergic to their pregnancy. I have not been invloved with it enough to know what symptons they might have. The mare does have senstivities to the enviornment. We did have her tested for that.

Thanks for the suggestion. I'm off to research it now!

;) S
 

Catherine Owen
Weanling
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 43
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 08:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan,
Just wondering how your mare is doing? Any updates?
 

Tahra Swan due 2/29
Yearling
Username: Tahra

Post Number: 54
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan hope all works out for your mare. After watching the video the first thing I noticed was that she was moving just like my gelding did a few years ago. He was diagnosed with a very mild upward Pateller Fixation. We treated him and worked hard at strengthening his tendons. He had alot of pain, swelling, and lamenes for a wile but due to it being mild he recovered and went back to light competition.
 

Susan catt
Nursing Foal
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 17
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thaks for asking folks. I am having yet another vet out (9) so far. none have thought it was stifle related. But hey the obvious right? We are stilllooking at hormonal shifts causing the ligaments to let go which then set her up for injury. Right now I am dealing with suspensorary ligaments. When wrapped she seems to walk okay, whennot wrapped the pasterns swell and she is lame to varying degrees. The original injury ( Pelvic) seems to be healing up. So far I ahve not been able to watch her get off the ground isince I have been stalling her (One week). But prior to that she was still getting up from the ground in a paralytic manner which kinda throw a wrench in to the foal pressing on a nerve theory.

All of your guys who have had to care for Sitfle and Ligament issues in your horses, PLEASE EMAIL ME info on how you addressed it. I dont want to abuse the repro site for leg issues unless everyone feels it is important to future breeding issues.

qiwmn@yahoo.com

I need to research everything I can and personal experience is the best medical advice there is. You learn what to do and what not to do. It makes you proactive and searching, which gives you the benefit of many medical practitioners advice and experience through the horse owner. This creates a broader scope for youand your vet to work through while narrowing down the possiblilities.

Since my mare has seen so many vets. This situation definately needs a broader scope. Which is why I cam to the repro people.

Thanks again guys! You all are so kind!

;) S
 

Tim Popovitz
Neonate
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 5
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 04, 2008 - 07:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've been watching this thread scince I joined a week ago. Unfortunately I have no answers, however, I have had a few experiences with this type of thing with mares that were near term with thier pregnancy. In nearly all the cases I was involoved in, the situation resloved itself after foaling, suggesting that it was a nerve thing. We attempted to manage thier subsequent pregnancies by limiting thier turn-out as they entered the last trimester, using support bandages on the hind legs, and pain management if necessary. The one common denominater was, these were all "older" mares who had lengthy performance careers.

That brings us to where you are: a relatively young mare( if I read correctly), still having problems a couple weeks post-foaling.

I think you are on to the fact that you have some cascading problems secondary to the original injury. I think it is great that you are willing to put in the time, effort and money to diagnose the initial cause, but, sometimes the best we can do is to treat the secondary issues, manage pain, and keep our fingers crossed.



This is my advice, it is not qualified by any success with this problem so take it with a grain of salt:

If this were my horse, I would have a complete set of base-line radiographs done of both hind legs, including the stifle. I would then assemble a small team of a good lameness vet and a progressive farrier to discuss the findings and possible treatments. There may be some hope of therapeautic shoeing/trimming to acheive a good balance of load bearing in order to get her headed in the right direction. There is also the hope that managing inflammation in certain areas can be very therapeuatic. A good lameness vet will suggest several alternatives to the bute- banamine standby.

I know it sounds counter-productive, but don't insist of finding a "cure" at this stage. Focus on making her comfortable. Get your team together, and stick with them. If you need to add another specialist in the future, make sure there is communication between them all.

I wish I could be of more help.

Good luck.
 

Susan catt
Nursing Foal
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 18
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, March 05, 2008 - 01:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim,

A voice of wisdom. Thanks so much for sharing. I have finally come to the idea that I may never know for certain what has caused the original break down. I am going with homronal imbalances and as you mentioned the strong possiblity that the foal was laying against a nerve. That together and with her activies caused an injury which mushroomed into subsequent stresses that ended up in stifle and suspensorary problems. Everything is off. So yes you are right about the support system. I have had my farrier increase her support barefoot via one of my vets suggestion. I have thought about shoes and supports. We have Walks-On-Water here in Arizona and I wish I could afford to send her there. Its 1200.00 a month. I just dont have it. I will be doing some radiographs though as soon as I can. I have my current vet coming out Friday to take a look at her as well. This man has been around for a long time and seen alot of things, he is the one with the homronal theory.

Bottom line is you are right to get her the support of a good team who can work together (If I can afford them all) and make her comfortable. I am currently treating her for suspensory ligaments until I see the vet on Friday.

Thanks again, and never hesitate to share.

;) S
 

Susan catt
Nursing Foal
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 19
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, June 12, 2008 - 10:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi guys, I took Tim's advice and gave up trying to find out how my mares condition came about and began treating the symptoms. It's scarry when you are not sure what you should choose first to treat when there are several conditions apparant and each requiring opposing treatments. After 9 vets conferred we chose ligament treatment to keep her standing. So into the stall she went to be locked up for the next however many months, leg wrapping continued and bute was given 1 gram morning and night along with 3 scoops of Yucca powder morning and night. A bar was put across the gate so that baby could run and play.

In the end, the last month prior to weaning her foal at 4 months of age, I had decided that if she had no progress 30 to 60 days after weaning that I was going to put her down. Her life was miserable and she remained in a high level of pain. Nothing had improved since my last post here up to that point. But she had delivered a gorgeous boy and raised him long enough to be safe to wean him.

He has been weaned three weeks now and here are some changes I have noticed.

1) her ligaments (Suspensory) have tightend up and are becoming hard and less sensitve to touch.

2)She has rolled for the second time since October of last year.

3)When getting up from laying down she walks out slowly and gingerly but does NOT stand ther with her hind legs pinned to one spot unable to move them.

4)Her attitude is improving and she feels like playing which I do not allow as yet.

One more month of twice daily meds and I start weaning her off the bute probably over another months time (very slowly). I have ceased wrapping her legs as of a couple weeks ago.

She still doesn't look right when she walks or she is very careful how she walks, but at least she is walking wihtout the nasty limping and cracking sounds.

Thought some of you might like to know what happened to her and how she is coming along. I am convinced I was right about her hormones involving her ligaments and the SPLD condition. Whether she sufferd SPDL due to the injury to her pelvic caused by the colt she was running with during her pregnancy(9 vets conferenced and came to agree on this theory), or if it was a predisposition we will probably never know.

I want people to be aware it can in fact be a possiblity in horses too.

My mare will never be bred again. However I am considering collecting and freezing three eggs from her for the future. She is the last female of her line. Her son is the last male. So I feel compelled to try.

Hope this finds every one well and all your horses fit and happy.

;) S
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1310
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 12, 2008 - 07:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, thank you so much for the update. I'm so happy to hear that you are finally starting to see some progress, it's sounds very promising. Good for you on not giving up on your mare! Keep us posted and take some pictures! :-)
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1485
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, June 13, 2008 - 07:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Susan, you've done a fabulous job, what a good mom you are! She sounds like she's a top notch mare and it's worth a try to save her eggs. I didn't know you could keep eggs for future use, very cool!

Can you post recent pictures or video of both of them, I would love to see how she's moving now and to see what your colt looks like, he's a nice looking boy on your last video. The mare is pretty too, with that long mane and forelock.
 

Susan catt
Nursing Foal
Username: Susancatt

Post Number: 20
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, June 13, 2008 - 11:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll try to remember to get video of her this weekend, and of her boy too. But here are the latest pics of them both.

Celt's Kindlewood
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/IMG_8937.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/3KWApr2008sm.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/2KWApr2008.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/1KWApr2008sm.jpg

Celt's Prophecy
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/10Pro35MoMay08.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/3Pro35MoMay08-1.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/Pro8.jpg
http://i49.photobucket.com/albums/f299/AzThunderPony/Pro6-1.jpg

You can see more at: http://www.celtsbaroques.com
The stallion on the front page of my website was Kindlewoods sire. He and his progengy are no longer viable to our breed. The stallion listed on the front page with his own link, The Spirit of Bear Paw, is the sire of Prophecy and is on his way to England soon. I will be keeping frozen semen from him for the future. If I do not save and freeze eggs from Kindlewood, I cannot reproduce the nick, as Kindlewood is done with pregnancies of any kind.

Thanks for your interest.

Sorry for so many pics, I couldnt choose. Kindlewood held her feet under her body to keep the strain off the ligaments, and her breast mucsles became huge from carrying all her weight. Her pretty feminine spanish type chest has been turned into something you might see on a QH. Small detail...

;) S
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1490
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, June 13, 2008 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Both are extremely nice horses, you are so lucky to have them. Thank you for sharing pictures with us. I'm looking forward to the video, if you get a chance.



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