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Concerns breeding a mare that is a windsucker

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Concerns breeding a mare that is a windsucker « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Phyllis Schroder
Weanling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 31
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Thursday, January 24, 2008 - 11:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 7 yr old TB mare that we will be breeding this season and my concern is that she is a terrible windsucker and how this may affect her carrying a foal.
She wears a nutcracker strap most of the time which seems to work for the most part but i have to keep it quite tight or it's not effective. I do have it covered with a fleece liner for comfort.
I abhore this habit but have come to learn it's something we have to live with where she's concerned. She had this habit when we purchased her and has obviously had it for many years.
I'm just quite thankful she's the only horse i have with this issue but am worried about the possible effects while she is in foal.
Since she can get bloated with air, is harder to keep weightwise and so on. Will this be an issue that may cause problems for her while carrying a foal, such as possibility of aborting, foal recieving proper nutrition while developing ect.
Would it be best to just leave the collar on 24/7 while in foal?
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 657
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Thursday, January 24, 2008 - 11:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I honestly don't know a lot about this condition but I believe this is where a caslick would be appropriate.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 792
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Friday, January 25, 2008 - 11:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

MY ONLY CONCERN WOULD BE IF SHE COULD POSSIBLY PASS THIS ON TO A FOAL
 

Sandy Smith
Breeding Stock
Username: Sandystone

Post Number: 171
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Friday, January 25, 2008 - 02:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Your vet should be able to answer your concerns, but I agree that a caslick is in order. I had a mare that also sucked wind and I had her caslicked with her last pregnancy and there were no problems at all.
 

Kay B. Jones, Topi due 3/1
Yearling
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 87
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Friday, January 25, 2008 - 04:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a wind sucker. She was very tipped I understand from having many foals. She aborted a foal last year at 6 months. Vet said it was possibly because, bacteria got in Vulva when she defecated and caused infection. We caslicked her this year and we are 5 weeks from delivery. All is going well.
 

Phyllis Schroder
Weanling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 32
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, January 25, 2008 - 07:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm sorry I should have been more specific on her condition. She is a windsucker in the sense of a cribber. Reproductively she's fantastic, no issues there. She doesn't chew wood but rests her top teeth on something presses down and sucks air.
This is not a condition that is hereditary or that I'm the least bit concerned with being passed on to a foal but a problem that stems from boredom and becomes an addiction to the horse (supposedly like a runners high).
It's rather common to find among race horses due to top physical condition and to much energy and time inside, boredom ect.
She is an ex race horse and probably acquired this addiction when she was young.
My concern is that it does make for a harder keeper weight and condition wise (she gets alot of extras), could this also effect how the nutrients are being passed to the foal?
At times she does get some bloating from air in the gut and some gas?
I'm just wondering if anyone has had a mare like this and done anything different or had any additional problems with her carrying a foal because of the habit and problems it can cause.
Hope this explains things a bit better and helps. Thanks, Phyllis
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 796
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Friday, January 25, 2008 - 09:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had a few mares do this all foaled fine every year. Have you tried a jolly ball or some other play thing to help her boredom? a corn cob spread with peanutbutter or some other tempting sticky substance hung from a rope sometimes works.
i have seen some foals pick this up from mom but never knew if it was just copy cat behavior or if it was possibly a hereditary thing.
 

Phyllis Schroder
Weanling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 35
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, January 25, 2008 - 11:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni,
Thanks for the encouraging info. Glad to hear it hasn't been an issue with being in foal.I was worried about her being more likely to colic or such.
She stays out just about 24/7 with other herdmates and has pasture or round bales to eat off all the time which keeps her pretty busy and helps alot but she will still do it or try to now and then even in the pasture. She'll go to a fence post, tree or anything she can find that will suffice to accomplish it. Once it's an engrained habit/addiction like hers it doesn't matter how much stimulus they have they'll still do it. Unfortunately, it's also one of the few habits that can't be broken or cured.
I prefer not to keep her stalled (they have run in sheds outside anyway) unless I have to for some reason cause she's far worse when stalled and I have no choice but to keep the collar on her continuosly.
I would imagine any foals picking it up from their dam are doing so from copycat behavior. I've never had any other horses or youngsters in the same pasture with her that have picked up on it from her, thank goodness, cause it drives me crazy.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 797
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 26, 2008 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

phylis my mares were out at pasture same as yours. I had an aquaintance that ruined 5 good mares by keeping them stalled 24/7 they all picked up the habit got so bad they literally ate their stalls. but reproductively they are fine
 

Phyllis Schroder
Weanling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 38
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Monday, January 28, 2008 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni,
That's a terrible shame about your friends mares. I can understand though how boredom and having a neighbor in the next stall doing it constantly could lead to the others picking up the habit.
thankfully ours have lots of pasture area and buddies to keep them busy and i rarely have to keep them stalled. I think their better off staying out as much as possible and happier. Not to mention makes things easier on me as well.
 

Catherine Owen
Neonate
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 9
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, February 22, 2008 - 04:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Probably picking up on this a bit late, but for what it is worth...
A cribber is a tough one. I had a mare that I really liked except for she was one BAD cribber! Cribbing straps, spray on bitter stuff --- none of it worked. We kept her out in the pasture (with electric fence) unless the weather was bad. She was so bad she would grab the very tops of the fence posts to "do her thing" out in the pasture. Side of the water trough, feed pail, salt block even!

Cribbers can and do "teach" the habit to other horses. Scared me to death regarding her babies. I liked this mare but I didn't want her raising a little cribber every year.

Since I didn't want to electrify the entire barn, I ended up as a last resort getting a breakaway halter with a cribbing muzzle attachment (the breakaway halter can be worn all the time and if it gets caught on a post or something the leather headstrap breaks and the horse can get free).

The cribbing muzzle was the answer for this mare. It has wide aluminum slats in the bottom of it and they can eat and drink just fine with it on, they just can't grab ahold of something. After we started using that on her, she gained some weight and you could bear to be around her again. I can't stand the sound a cribber makes!

As a side note, this mare would go thru about 3 or 4 of these things a year. She is rough on them and she did just completely lose one, one time. We still haven't found it. Have no idea, maybe she ate it!
 

Mood Swings
Yearling
Username: Mood_swings

Post Number: 91
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ahh a cribber... I thought by the term "wind sucker" you were referring to a mare that sucks wind through her vulva. Completely different LOL

I have a mare that cribs, her weanling does not. She is a fine broodmare and I have no hesitation about re-breeding her.
 

casallc
Neonate
Username: Casallc

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, February 23, 2008 - 06:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This was good for a laugh (wrong end). I doubt her cribbing will effect the foal unless you fly into a rage and shoot her and the foal dies in utreo (probably what I'd do).



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