MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Flighty mare post foaling/would like to imprint/HELP

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Flighty mare post foaling/would like to imprint/HELP « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Gina McMahon
Nursing Foal
Username: Moonlitpaints

Post Number: 15
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 01:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay heres the deal. I bought a mare this year from a large breeding farm where she was just turned out on pasture with the broodmare band. She was injured as a weanling and had a few tramatic experiences with people that have left her very wary of people.
She had her first foal before I bought her and I got the two of them in a package deal. It took me forever just to get her to the point that I could take the halter off and on her. When you go to pet her neck or shoulder she just shudders and sinks herself away from your hand. I have spent alot of time just picking her stall and talking to her and she mainly just stands in the corner until you are done but at least she quit trying to climb the wall to get away. I can now lead her to and from the pasture and pet her as long as I get ahold of her halter first, but she still shudders.
Of course she passed all of this onto her foal. He learned from her that we are to be feared and avoided and it has taken weaning the foal and quite a bit of work to get him turned around. She is a fantastic mother, a beautiful mover, and bred in the purple. To those who will undoubtedly ask why I would breed a mare with such a problem with people in the first place I will simply say that her problems are man made and she is certainly of quality which is why I am determined to overcome her issues.
My question, she is due to foal in March and I would love to be able to imprint this foal and continue working with it early like I do my others so that this one will have the easy start in life that my other foals do. Is there anything I can give the mare to calm her post foaling and last a little while? Is is horrible to restrain her while I work with the foal or will this only prove to her that I am to be feared? I know that while I work with the foal she will assume I am trying to hurt it. Any ideas? I am hoping that the more time she is with me and the more I get to work with her that this will no longer be a problem but March is fast approaching!
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 593
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 03:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Gina, you could probably give her a mild tranq like Ace. I know of a mare that was rejecting her foal so they tranqed the mare and worked with the foal and also worked with mare to let the foal nurse. After a few times of this it all worked out fine. So, if your mare was a little sleepy she might not fret so much when you handle the baby. :-)
 

Gina McMahon
Nursing Foal
Username: Moonlitpaints

Post Number: 18
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 03:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So a mild tranqualizer wouldn't hurt the baby when it gets ingested in the mares milk? That may even help the mare out some if we can kinda go all over her too while she has the edge taken off. Good suggestion!
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 800
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Would giving her a mild tranqualizer keep her from expelling the afterbirth?
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 594
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 07:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good question Marilyn, I'm not sure about that but usually the afterbirth is expelled fairly quickly after the foal so I suppose you could wait to tranq the mare until everything passes.

Gina, I'm not sure how much of Ace goes into the milk but it's a fairly mild tranquilizer and the foal that my friend had didn't seem to have any effects. I'm sure a vet would know though.
 

Gina McMahon
Nursing Foal
Username: Moonlitpaints

Post Number: 19
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 07:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I will be sure to run everything past my vet, but I think this could actually work :-)
Thanks Tracy
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 595
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Keep us posted :-)
 

Amanda
Neonate
Username: Northpine

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 09:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When my mare wouldn't accept her foal for nursing this past spring, we gave her a shot of ace to calm her down, and a couple other doses of pain meds and meds to let the milk down faster.. She was so swollen up and full of milk it was painful, and as a maiden she was scared of her foal back there and thought he was intentionally hurting her.

It was 6 hours before my vet could get to the farm. All the while this little colt was still going strong, he was very persistent! We finally dosed her up and held her for nursing. I continued holding her every couple hours, and by that afternoon, I came home from some errands to find her standing and letting him nurse on her own.

The colt was pretty sleepy come that night when the drugs passed through her milk, but not in a way where we worried, the vet told us he'd get a little drowsy and that was normal. The only major issue that worried me was that he had a small plug of tacky manure that hadn't passed and being so sleepy he just kept laying down to sleep! A quick enema fixed the problem and he was fine and normal come the next day. I would wait until the afterbirth is expelled and then drug her a bit. Your vet can leave extra doses of ace with you to continue to dose her if need be. Good luck!
 

Gina McMahon
Weanling
Username: Moonlitpaints

Post Number: 21
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you so much for the personal experience! It makes me feel much better about considering this as an option :-)
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 596
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, January 18, 2008 - 09:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I routinely administer an enema to all my foals anyway to make sure they pass their poop :-) Once they have nursed for the first time we give the enema and they usually pass their stool fairly quick after that.
 

Melissa Schalk
Nursing Foal
Username: Cedarhillfarm

Post Number: 18
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 19, 2008 - 08:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I say let her and her foal bond if there are no pressing medical needs you have a life time to bond with this baby why stress them unless you have to.
 

Gina McMahon
Weanling
Username: Moonlitpaints

Post Number: 27
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 19, 2008 - 11:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I certainly plan on letting the mare and foal bond first. I never step in unless there are issues with the foaling, but instead watch from outside of the stall. On the same token I think imprinting is an important step and do this after mare and baby have had a chance to bond and rest a bit. It makes for a very managable foal :-)I sell my babies very soon after they are weaned, so it is improtant during this time to teach them leading, grooming, picking up feet, etc. That way they go to their new home ready to take on the world with no fear :-)
 

Michele
Yearling
Username: Mich

Post Number: 80
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Sunday, January 20, 2008 - 09:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Gina, I too bought a mare who, though broken and used for endurance, had been left for some years in the pasture and not handled. She wasn't nasty in any way, just an old mare not used to being handled. Because of her pedigree and conformation and quality of the foals she'd had before I wanted one from her before I retired her. She was extremely protective over her foal, and though I usually wean at 6 mos. I did this one at 4 mos. Before that, however, I only worked with them when they were in the foaling stable [which is twice the size of the regular stable] so that neither could get away. I would also only feed the mare in the stable.

At first I just groomed the mare, ignoring the foal, and eventually the foal was too inquisitive and came nosing around. It took a while, but the mare eventually let me handle the foal without creating.

Because the mare wasn't inherently nasty, the foal didn't inherit her fear of people. When weaning time came at 4 mos. I took the mare to another farm for three months and then really started working with the foal.

I only allowed her one paddock mate, and an older foal at that, so that she could not bond with a herd and thereby ignore me. It worked, and she today she is a very docile, well behaved, human-loving mare who is ridden by a 15yr old girl.

I think just take your time and try not to stress or hurry the process up or the horses will pick it up and react negatively. I think working in a safe confined space is the answer. Even if for the first few days you just sit in the corner and read a book, ignoring them. Eventually the mare will realise that you mean no harm.
Good Luck!
 

Gina McMahon
Weanling
Username: Moonlitpaints

Post Number: 29
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 20, 2008 - 10:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the advice Michele, this is such a great board, every one is genuinely concerned about the well being of the horse and you get some really great ideas from several perspectives. I have a feeling I will use a combination approach, I will be sure to let everyone know how it goes come March :-)
I hope by next year this mare will be just another happy Moonlit mare, I plan on spending alot of time with her to ease her worries, poor girl.
 

Lynn Ison
Breeding Stock
Username: Lynndi

Post Number: 680
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, January 21, 2008 - 08:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great post Michele !
Gina, from your beginning post .. it shows you are progressing with mama mare! I say keep working with Mama-6 weeks of daily handling /grooming/re-asuring) will do wonders with the mare. March still leaves plenty of time and the way you talk.I am sure that mare will come to adore and trust you! good luck ....



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US