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Could it be possible she could be bred?!

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Could it be possible she could be bred?! « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Lisa M
Weanling
Username: Lisamm

Post Number: 23
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 03, 2007 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

(LINK TO PICTURES ADDED BELOW!!!!) Okay I have a 18 yr old QH mare that foaled a HUGE stud colt this year and it took alot out of her! It caused her to form 6 cysts.. vet didn't seem too worried about it. We AI'd (one time) her on a 42mm follicle and she ovulated not even 24hrs later.. ok so we did the oxytocin and infusion everything was textbook until her 15 day checkup she was open and had a 38mm follicle back to the vet she goes order semen and bred on a 41-42mm follicle (AI'd her about 4 hours before ovualation and also about 3-4 hours post ovulation) also did the oxytocin protocol and infusion took her back for her 15 day check and it took him about 15 mins to tell me he "Thinks" shes still open but she has no visible breedable follicle at the time like the previous time.. now my question is I talked with the Stallion owner and he said when a mare has a hard pregnancy sometimes they will not concieve.. it took us forever to get the weight back on her but now that is is healthy she has a BIG belly it does not look like she is just fat.. so my question is (and my vet did admit this to me) there a chance that she might be pregnant and we missed it on the 15 post ovulation check, he said sometimes the pregnancy can hide behind those cysts. I have over $5,000 in this stud fee/vet bills right now and I just totally gave up after she came up "open" this last time. I plan on shipping her to OK this spring to get bred but I would like everyones take on this situation.. I am thinking I may need to get her checked.. thanks in advance!!!

(Message edited by lisamm on November 04, 2007)
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 460
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Saturday, November 03, 2007 - 07:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How on earth do you have over $5000 invested? Are your stud fees not live foal? So you would just have semen collection and shipping charges involved and the little your vet has done from your previous post is an ultrasound which is the most expensive and perhaps a few follicle checks so that would be around $100. I never go on just the 15 day check I keep teasing and if she does not come back in I check again. How did your mare tease?
 

Lisa R.
Breeding Stock
Username: Lisa98

Post Number: 178
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, November 03, 2007 - 09:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

get her checked....seems pretty straight forward to me here......good luck!!
 

Debbie Burnett
Breeding Stock
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 373
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Saturday, November 03, 2007 - 10:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I once didnt believe the vet when she told me that my mare had lost her foal, so I called another one and got the same result. Another time, I had a mare checked at 18 days and found to be open, rechecked at 30 days and found to be in foal - it wasnt immaculate conception and just goes to prove that its best to recheck to be sure. Even if one vet says shes open and you have a gut feeling, get a second opinion.
 

Tracy Smith
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 271
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 12:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I also say get her checked. I have a mare that has multiple cysts in her uterus, at 16 day ultrasound was told not pregnant. She never came back in heat, had her rechecked, Pregnant!
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1604
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 12:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The first thing to be aware of - although it's too late now - is that the presence of a follicle (or the absence of once come to that) at 15-21 days post previous ovulation/breeding is not indicative of anything! Some pregnant mares will have them, and some not. So don't rely on that to tell you anything!

The next point for consideration is that if the mare has cysts, you need to "map" the position of them in the uterus so that you don't end up wondering if what you are looking at is a pregnancy or not (but you know that too now!! :-)).

Finally, by 21 days the embryonic heartbeat will start to be visible - and cysts don't have a heartbeat, so have you mare checked again, and look for one! :-)
 

Marilyn Lemke
Breeding Stock
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 347
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 07:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa M, most definately have your mare rechecked.
You don't want to take a chance of her being pregnant with possible twinning. I hope she is pregnant for you. Those cysts can cause lots of confusion if you don't know where they are located, especially when there are so many.

I know what you mean about the high costs, it can be very expensive! Good luck to you and your mare.
 

Lisa M
Weanling
Username: Lisamm

Post Number: 24
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 12:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry I must clarfiy.. I have over $5000 in the stud fee and vet bills but that is still alot! lol Yes my vet was very careful at watching the cysts and did document them.. this mare does not tease period and never has you have to watch follicles on her to get her bred.. she has 9 babies this way. I just threw in the towel as it gets very frustrating but she "looks" pregnant to me but then again she could be just carrying her fat in her belly.. I don't know I probably should just get her checked for good measure.. as we only had her checked once at 15 days.. thanks for the advice and info!!! It's great!
 

Saleste Clark
Neonate
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 6
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 12:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We had a mare that we had checked at 40 days, and the vet still told us she wasnt preggo. We just gave up on her until one day she had this huge udder and so we hurried and penned her up and made as many preparations as we could, and in about a week, we had a healthy foal! If there is any chance she could be pregnant, by all means get her checked!!!
 

Marilyn Lemke
Breeding Stock
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 356
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 02:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Can you tell I'm at home with not much ambition. LOL! It's cold outside, but sunny and very windy. I don't have much desire to do anything, so I'm on the computer a lot today.

Lisa, please keep us posted, I'm very interested in the ultrasound results. It would be great if she did end up preggo!

Saleste, that would be so weird to discover that your mare was pregnant right before foaling. Kinda nice you didn't have to worry about her pregnancy that whole time. Especially since the foal was healthy. It was very fortunate for you!

Guess I'll check out the American Holsteiner Assoc. website now...
 

Saleste Clark
Neonate
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 10
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It was very weird, but she had always been a VERY fat horse, and we figured that since she had been checked at 40 days, the vet was probably right. She was also our first mare to ever have foal. It was very nice, compared to now waiting on 2 to foal! i took it for granted, but now I realize how lucky we actually were!!
 

Lisa M
Weanling
Username: Lisamm

Post Number: 25
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 04:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I mean the mare gets great care and feed and it still wormed with pregnant mare safe paste "just incase" but I think you are all right I should just get her checked... I think I would have a heart attack if she was lol! I will try and get pics to show you!(even though I know pics can't tell you one way or another)
 

Lisa M
Weanling
Username: Lisamm

Post Number: 26
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 05:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay here is a link to some pics I took today and pics of her when she was pregnant last year... can ya tell me what you think?!

http://pic1.piczo.com/Tlpaintsandquarterhorses/?g=31857457&cr=1
 

Marilyn Lemke
Breeding Stock
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 361
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 06:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa, I could not believe it was the same horse, it looks like two completely different colors.

Gosh, that's a tough one. She certainly has a belly. Has she had a belly all along? By looking at her and if I had to guess, I would guess she looked preggers. If I had a mare that looked like that, I would for sure have a vet check her out. I don't think the vet can ultrasound if she would be 5 months along, he would have to palpate her. This would be less expensive.

(Message edited by marilyn_l on November 04, 2007)
 

Lisa M
Weanling
Username: Lisamm

Post Number: 27
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 07:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You know what we did is started them on Flax seed and that is how much their coats changed! It's crazy they have thick winter coats but they are very shiny! Yes she looks very questionable to me but I am not a vet.. the pic where she was 4 months pregnant is what she usually looks like.. but we have been pumping the feed to her...
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 464
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 09:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa I still don't understand how you have over $5000 in a stud fee when your mare has not had the foal as of yet..........does your breed not do a live foal, pay when foal stands and nurses?
 

Lisa M
Weanling
Username: Lisamm

Post Number: 28
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 09:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No you have to pay in full up front $3500 stud fee plus two times to ship and $250 a piece. We also have over $1,000 in vet bills from her being bred. Now next year if she is open I have to pay another $250 chute fee plus breeding fees. They only give you two years to get a foal and if you don't you are SOL...
 

Marilyn Lemke
Breeding Stock
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 371
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 09:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy, I'm not sure how Lisa's contract reads but with the Holsteiners that we use, we pay for the stud fee in advance, with a live foal guarantee. If the mare doesn't get pregnant that year, then the breeding is free for the following year or you have a choice of using a different mare. But it does have to be paid in advance.

Kinda stinks, but that's the way it's done with Holsteiners.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1605
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, November 04, 2007 - 10:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy - TB's are one of the few breeds where the stud fee - as a matter of routine - does not have to be paid until there is a live foal on the ground. Most other breeds require payment of the stud fee "up front", and then you get to breed back (in some cases for a limited period) in the event that you do not get the mare pregnant or she does not have a live foal.
 

Beth
Neonate
Username: Gracie

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 02:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a mare who I bred years ago and she came up open. The stallion was sold and the new owners honored our return privilidges for 2 months, so we took her to him and tried one last time. She stayed there 2 months. When she came home, we waited 60 days (per the vet's request) and took her for palpation and ultrasound and he called her open. He said we could wait another 10 days and bring her back to be sure, so I did. This went on and on, and I ended up taking the poor mare for a total of 4 palpations, 6 ultrasounds, and one blood test. The vet called her open each and every time.

Now, I'll say that I was a college student at the time and when I went back to school in the fall, I left my non-horsie parents with no instructions for caring for a pregnant mare because I'd been told she was NOT PREGNANT.

My mother phoned one Friday night in October around 11 PM and all she could say over and over was "come home now, it's your mare." Truthfully, I thought something was horribly wrong and I said "call the vet....is she dead....is it colic....WHAT??" She told me that my dad went to feed and that they'd had problems with the neighbor's dog in the barn...."there was something in the mare's stall and he thought a dog had drug a towel in there.....but it's a colt in there with your mare. Your mare had a colt and you have to come home. Now." I grabbed a change of clothes and jumped in the car and started the 6 hour drive and called the vet on the way and got the answering service. He called me back and I told him who I was and he remembered me, and I told him that the mare he called open 11 times had a foal, I was en route from school 6 hrs away, could he please go to the farm and take care of the foal and mare. He declined, saying he had his child that weekend. To say I was outraged is an understatement. I called my non-horsie parents back and stayed on the phone with mom while she told dad what to do with the umbilicus and iodine and how to do the enema. I did the rest when I got there.

Prettiest and healthiest little black filly you ever saw! And the nastiest visit to the vet the next morning you can imagine.

.....and that is my story of a suprise foal and how I got my present vet (who I absolutely adore!)
 

Tracy Smith
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 274
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 03:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa, she sure does look pregnant. I would have her checked.

With Arabians you also pay the full stud fee up front and most breeders let you keep breeding until you have a live foal. If you can't get your mare pregnant you can usually use a different mare for no extra charge.
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 465
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 06:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Beth, congrats. I would however change vets though. Not just because he misseed her at 60 days which 90% of vet students could have detected but because your vet requested a 60 day window. A LOT happens in those 60 days with with intervention can be helped. #1 being twins. If in fact it was found that yur mare had twins there is nothing you could do at 60 days except abort everything. Also mares with low progesterone levels can be detected early on, if left on their own, they will abort, which would have happened by 60 days. Change vets.
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 466
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 06:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

God Jos it would be awful to be locked into the same stud who did not catch you the year before. Because so much of out breeding is done for the market, what is trendy. what is hot and trendy this year may not book full next year. Can you imagine paying $500,000 for Storm Cat up front, and not getting in foal and then have them drop the fee to $300,000 the next year?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1606
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 10:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Perhaps it would create some stability in the TB breeding world instead of everyone breeding to the "latest greatest"! :-)
 

Lisa R.
Breeding Stock
Username: Lisa98

Post Number: 179
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa M-good luck with your mare; do let us know what you find out ok. I've heard it said that the only way to know that a horse is pregnant just from looking is if there are hooves coming out of her vulva....so I'm not going to venture a guess from your pics (she does look very different now though - coat wise).

We andalusian people pay up front too with the live foal guarantee if she doesn't take or doesn't deliver a live foal. We usually have the choice to sub a mare if we want or need to too. Our breed doesn't buy into the latest and greatest philosophy either, like the TB's do; so it's pretty likely that if you wanted the foal out of him last year you still will this year.
 

Kim Peavy
Weanling
Username: Lovemysinbad

Post Number: 34
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 12:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had to pay my stud fee up front too! Although it wasn't much...I bred to a friesian/TB Cross Black stallion....my mom bred to a TB, and she doesn't pay until foal hits ground and nurses...guess that's the TB way....I would love not to pay! LOL
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 467
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Stability and thoroughbred just don't go together, I agree with you but unfortunately the industry does no!
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 847
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 01:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I bred my Paso Fino mare to a Paso fino Stallion and paid the stud fee up front with a Live Foal quarantee. My mare delivered a full term stillborn filly in 2006, (when I bred in 2005 the stallion was young showing lots of promise but had not won any large show and his stud fee was at an introductory level)I had a necropsy done establishing that filly had not taken a breath. So when I contacted the breeder they were more than willing to honor the contract but the stallion had gone to Florida for the show season, I live in CA, so I did incur vet bills and semen shipping bills but his stud fee had quadrupled for new mares because of how well he was doing in the show ring. Happy to say I do have a beautiful filly born this year.
 

Beth
Neonate
Username: Gracie

Post Number: 3
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 05:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy, I did change vets, the very next day! Not to mention the twins issue (thank goodness that was not an issue), but I was in college at the time getting my BS in Agriculture, major in Animal Science and my senior thesis that I was working on was Reproductive Ultrasound in the Mare!! I knew that a 60 day fetus should palpate like the size of a basketball rectally and he must have just not done it correctly or something. But, the part that angered me beyond the point of any return was the yes, I'm on call but I won't come because I have my child comment. What's the point in taking call? And to decline after he missed the mare that many times just put the icing on the cake for me.

I now have a wonderful vet who knows I need him when I call and comes right away. He has never missed a mare and if he runs into anything he doesn't know, he says so and he finds out. That's a mark of a really good vet.

The filly who slipped up on all of us is one of the ones who is now bred. She's due in June!
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 469
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 05:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow on call but won't come, I would be livid and let him know it. Around here if you are a vet on call the only thing that stops you is you are on a call then the vet second on call comes, then the only thing that stops them is a flat tire! I just don't comprehend that at all.
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 470
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 05:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jan you are kidding me, you had to prove it did not take a breath! Yikes around here if you have a foal and it is questionable the stallion owner gives us a chance to either make it work or put it down. we definately do not have to go to the expense of a necropsy! The new thing going is foal stands and nurses for 7 days.
 

Saleste Clark
Nursing Foal
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 17
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 05:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ok, I have to tell my horror stories of the Great Equine Vets of Huntsville, AR. We had a Mustang filly that was making these odd movements when she ate and her food was pouring out of her nose. We, of course, called our vet and to begin with, he refused to treat her b/c she was a Mustang and when he FINALLY came out, he said she was colicing and put her on IV's. Turns out, she had CHOKE!! Much easier to deal with than the immense vet bill we had to pay. So then, last fall, we had a mare that was acting very strange, so we called the vet and she said it was definelty colic, but refused to come out!! My mom had to drive 1 1/2 hrs to the new and supposedly better vets house to get Banamine. The mare ended up having Opposum Disease and went through endless hrs of pain just to die just b/c a stupid vet wouldn't come out!! Thankfully, we now have an Equine Specialist about 45 mins. away, and I'm also going to school to become an Equine Vet so that maybe I can save somebody from making a needless mistake.
sorry, I really needed to vent!
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 471
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 10:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yikes by your first sentence I diagnosed it as a choke, your vet sucked!
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 848
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 10:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy...sadly not necessarily true here...a live foal is considered one that stands and nurses, mine was full term but still born. The positive side of the necropsy is to find out if there was anything wrong with foal and what the cause of death was. Turned out my mare had placentitis (sp?) Heartbreaker but fixable and I am so delighted with the filly I got...the stallion owner has tried a couple of times to see if there was any interest on my part to sell her...Nope she is not for sale :-)
 

Michele
Yearling
Username: Mich

Post Number: 70
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 11:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would like to ask this from a stallion owner's point of view: If one offers a live foal guarantee, does that include if the mare owner is negligent and the mare loses the foal, or the mare has problems producing a live foal?
It would seem that much of the chance of the mare having a live foal would depend on the above? After all if the mare becomes pregnant surely the stallion has done his job and the stallion owner has lived up to their side of the contract?
I have seen some studs offer a 90 or 120 day in-foal guarantee and that's it.
 

Saleste Clark
Weanling
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 21
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Monday, November 05, 2007 - 11:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I believe that the contract should include IF the mares owner gives her all her shots (pneumabort, rhino, etc) and wormer and such. If the mare owner fails to provide adequate care then that would surely be grounds of exempting the contract? that is just my take, my stallion has another couple years before we have to worry about that!
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 472
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 04:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nope in thoroughbreds it is just plain old live foal. With all the money people have invested in them I would think 90% of them get proper care. And those that don't most likely don't get in foal anyway cause if you won't spend the money to vacccinate then chances are you won't spend it on a repro vet.
 

Saleste Clark
Weanling
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 23
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 08:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

thats a good point. I hadnt thought of that!! I was thinking locally, but Arkansas' not exactly a hot seat for stallions!! I dont think the stallions we have around here even have live foal...it's pretty much 'hey buddy, can i breed to your stallion?'. I guess the honor system? I dont know. Oh, the simple life...
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 625
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 09:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saleste,
I have QH's and breed to QH's.
In all of my contracts, there were excerpts about confirming pregnancy, veterinary attention, etc. When my mare was confirmed in foal, I had to contact the breeding station and let them know by (I'd have to check) 18 days post breeding.
Not providing "timely" veterinary care would terminate my live foal guarantee. Granted, NOT a problem for me because I tend to errr...uhhh jump the gun :-).
Some of my contracts even stated that if the mare continued training or showing, that the live foal guarantee was void.
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 849
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 10:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My contract did stipulate mare care; but like Heather and Cathy a non issue for me since my horses have routine vet care and I too have my vet's number programmed into my cell phone under "favorites" :-) I am also blessed to live in an area where my vet or one of his associates can be there within 30-60 minutes. Some on this board live in remote areas where they have to haul their horse to the Equine facility or it takes several days to get a vet out. The most important thing is to have a contract and both sign whatever the stipulations so that the communication is there.
 

Saleste Clark
Weanling
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 25
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 11:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When it comes time to come up with my breeding contract, I think that I may lean a little more to the strict side, just to be on the safe side!! My stud colt is QH too, there is more to this stuff that what i originally thought! Oh well, I have a couple years to figure it all out, i guess! My mares also get routine check up's...I think the local vets may hate me...so I dont think I would have any trouble with a contract
 

Emily West
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 319
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 01:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saleste,
I agree. That is what I would do. Spell out specific things that they need to do for the mare and then show those records if the foal dies. I know that this is what my friend does for health guarantees for her purebred puppies. If they don't follow the rules the contract is void. That way both parties are have their responsibilities spelled out.
My 2 cents. :-)
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 474
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saleste I would look at different breeding operations within your breed, find the ones you respect who do a good job and get their contract and emulate it. If you are too strict with a contract you may back off potential clients, and in this day and age unless you have a superhorse clients are few and far between.
 

Saleste Clark
Weanling
Username: Saleste

Post Number: 26
Registered: 10-2007
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've been looking around at quite a few, but it's kinda hard to decide. Like I said, around here people just kinda go on the honor system, if you want to call it that. But then, nobody really advertises other than by word of mouth. It's all very confusing! I know I'll need to get a website going to get more clients from out of area, I have a 'mini' website right now but it's feature's are pretty limited. It gets overwhelming at times, but I know it's all worth it!!

Ya'll are helping me alot, thanks!! Keep it coming, b/c I'm new to the stallion part. Well, at least publicly standing one.
 

Cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 476
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 - 10:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There are a lot of good breeders in Texas, call them and have them fax you a contract.



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