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Advice needed from Arab owners

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » General Mare Questions - Volume 2 » Advice needed from Arab owners « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 107
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2007 - 09:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Since my 24 year old Appy mare, Star, was put down last week due to a twisted intestine, I have been searching for another horse since we are only left with our Shetland gelding. He needs a companion and I need someone to ride again (although there will never be another Star).

I found a little pinto arab for sale about 40 miles from us. I only have a couple of head shots of her that the owner sent, but I think she is beautiful. I requested a full body shot, but haven't gotten it yet. She's five years old and is green broke. The owner said she is a great horse, very willing to please and friendly, just needs work from someone who'll have the time she needs. She's only been ridden a handful of times. I do have experience with arabs as my parents have always had them, but am wondering if she'll be right for my situation.

Here's my situation. Some of you know I have a month-old filly (Luna), but she is currently at my parents' place. Her momma is now my dad's horse, and I will get Luna back in the fall or whenever she's ready for weaning. I just couldn't leave our pony alone for the next few months as he's so lonely and figured I would get another riding horse that's already well trained. I didn't think I should get another young horse that needs a lot of work as I will have my hands full with Luna. But, there is something about this mare that keeps calling to me even though I haven't met her yet! (We're scheduled to meet tomorrow evening.)

For those of you who have trained arabs, are they quick learners? Is is feasible to have her "finished" by the time Luna comes back? I've always heard that arabs are too high strung and hot headed, but know that's not always the case based on my dad's horses. He's only had two, but had one since birth (he was just put down a few weeks ago at age 22) and he's had the other one since he was four. He's now 24.

Any thoughts are appreciated. I know I'm getting ahead of myself as I haven't even seen her, but like I said, there's just something about her...
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 108
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2007 - 10:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here are the only pics I have so far:

http://s168.photobucket.com/albums/u194/black_opal_photos/
 

Kris Moos
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kris

Post Number: 1105
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2007 - 12:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had a few arabs in the past 20 years...one I bought at a year old, she is now 18 and i still own her, her daughter is 12 that i currently own and she has a quarab yearling foal i own, i have had others but have chosen to sell them at 18 years old to avoid the "old horse" illnesses and hearache of losing one. The one that is 18 now I will probably have till her end day!
In the same amount of time I have had several other breeds of horses...none of which stayed longer than a couple years...this being said, I would have to say, yes they are fast learners, they can do about anything any other breed can do if they are given equal patience, training and exposure. The arabs i own live outside with a lean to for a barn, they are not stalled, they are exposed to wild life, tarps, boards, cars, tractors, ATV's and dont have a problem with it. The only problem I find consistant with my arabs is they are not too fond of water crossings, but can be "talked" across usually. Arabs are given that hot headed flighty nervous stereo type because of the shoe barns. Many arabs that are shown are kept isolated and not exposed to the world....I believe its all in the upbringing and handling. Yes arabs are naturally more alert...they will notice everything ...but the experience I have had is they are EXTREMELY fast learners!!!! (taught my yearling to lunge in 5 minutes, taught my little mare to nod her head yes in about 7 minutes, taught the same horse to move on leg cues in about 15 minutes, both my of age mares were saddled and ridden from the first day of training...no bucking, rearing, fighting the bit...nothing! but on the other hand they will be the first to figure out how to open the stall door, or the gate to the round pen, or to notice an open gate or downed fence! They are that intune to their souroundings!
A five year old green broke arab is about right, most arabs will not begin their riding career till they are 4-6 years old since they are slower growing than many other breeds.
The best thing to do is go see this horse, spend a day handling it and exposing it to things you will be encountering while riding, if she is what you want and you are willing to put the time in then shes the one...go with your gut feeling on how the horse handles and behaves, NOT how pretty it is...because I have had some GORGEOUS horses...but they didnt stay because they were only eye candy...useless otherwise! So dont go off looks alone...go off personality, and behavior!!!!! YOU CANT RIDE A COLOR OR LOOKS!!! just like you cant ride a registration paper...so if you are looking for a riding horse...she needs to be able to just that!
 

Robin Culbertson
Weanling
Username: Murrini

Post Number: 45
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2007 - 12:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have numerous arabs and agree completly with Kris. The biggest thing I have to add is that they are smart which adds to their "bad rap" because they are often smarter than their owners who make excuses for their behavior and let them get away with it. Water, I agree in the beginning I have a bit more trouble getting them to cross but they seem to get over it quickly as we ALWAYS have water around where we live so they get used to crossing it.

I take my arabs packing into the wilderness and do ANYTHING on them that people do on any other breed. A few weekends ago we met up with a professional packer and ended up riding with him into some nasty rough country (Southern Trininty Alps in California). In the beginning of the ride he didn't think much of arabs but after 2 days of nasty trail blazing (the arabs were the ones leading & cutting through the nasty stuff & We all came out bloody from the trees and brush it was so thick), riding on the edge of cliffs and running into a bear he was way impressed by our horses. Plus the fact we were riding barefoot over granite the whole ride (35 miles) and their feet came out looking perfect. I was on a 5 yr old that I have only had for 2 months and he was leading the way through a lot of it with complete confidence, but I have had to earn his trust. Now that he knows I will not get him hurt if he listens to me he will do anything I ask. All of the arabs I have broke were first ridden on the trail (I do not back a horse in an arena, I prefer putting them on a trail behind an experienced horse and we just go for it. They have all had enough ground work and trust me enough that they don't buck) This gets them over being spooky about stuff real quick and they seem to learn to enjoy being ridden faster because they get to get out and see stuff & they learn to trust you faster. I have a horse that actually pouts if you don't take him when he sees the trailer. I would not trade my arabs for anything!!
 

Lori Coleman
Breeding Stock
Username: Editorlady

Post Number: 325
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2007 - 12:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a few arabs as well; I've had all of them in the show ring as well as on trails. They are very intelligent; more so than the QH and TBs I have. I love them all dearly. They are very quick learners, very people friendly and animated, and don't live up the the stereotypes. Arabs don't typically begin training until 4-6 years, as Kris said, because their growth isn't done until then. But once you begin with them, they typically have a great work ethic and really enjoy having a job. An arab without a job can be a handful, as they need to have something to keep them occupied both in mind and body.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 173
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 07, 2007 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer- Ditto what Kris said, go check her out, forget what she looks like and what the papers say. I've dealt with a lot of breeds over the years, Arabs included. They can run hot, but that does not mean they aren't good horses or that they are all that way, so much (with any horse) depends on how they are handled and what they've been taught (or sometimes NOT taught) Personally, I'll probably never own anything other than a quarter horse from here on in, somehow, after years of working with them, other horses just don't look quite right to me. (although occasionally a pretty TB will cross my path and catch my attention) Arabs are tough little horses, real go-getters by nature, if that is what you are looking for, you may well have found your new love.. Best of luck! Ev
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 109
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Friday, June 08, 2007 - 08:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow! Thank you all so much for your responses! I have certainly learned a lot. I'm still waiting to hear back from the owner for directions to her place. I'm so anxious to see this horse tonight, but now the owner is being elusive and I haven't been able to get a hold of her. I'll let you know how it goes!
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 113
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 09, 2007 - 08:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay, more advice needed! Well, I looked at her last night and I did end up putting a down payment on her. I'm just hoping I didn't bite off more than I can chew, but I felt the need to save her.

First of all, I discovered that she's not just green broke, she hadn't even been touched before age 4 which is when this lady got her. According to her, the previous owners had to knock her out to get her hooves her done and they only did that once a year. Now, this lady said her farrier has made progress. Her hooves are in need of trimming, but they didn't look neglected, so it looks like they have been getting done. Her current owner said she bought her last year, rode her about five times and she has basically just sat since then because she got pregnant (the owner) and just hasn't had the time. She did saddle her for me, but couldn't get the bridle on. I feel confident I can do wonders with her and I have the time.

This is my main concern, though, that I was hoping for some advice. She's being kept in a very small dirt/mud paddock that's way overcrowded. It's not large enough for one horse, let alone the four that were in there. She's super skinny, yet the other horses were of good weight. They all have access to a round bale. I asked if she was at the bottom of the pecking order and she said she was probably in the middle. So then I asked her if she had some kind of illness and she swears she's healthy. Her reason for her being so thin is because she was left at a trainer for 3 weeks and he didn't take care of her.

My question is, are arabs typically difficult to keep weight on? Should I be suspicious of an underlying condition? This woman really gave me no reason to think she was lying. She did admit she didn't have the room and was having trouble taking care of them. We have about 2 1/2 acres fenced off that's divided into two pastures. I have an area of about 20 x 48 that can be enclosed with access to a stall, but is all cement. If/when I bring her home, what's the best way to introduce her to the lush grass? She currently has no grass and I want to do it right so as to avoid her getting colic or founder. Would it be best to confine her to the small area with hay and just give her an hour or so a day on the grass and gradually increase the time in the pasture and decrease the hay? My other mare and pony always did fine on pasture alone during the summer and that would be my goal with her unless any of you think that's a bad idea. I'm pretty sure all this mare needs is some good groceries. Again, I appreciate any thoughts!
 

Jennifer Graef
Weanling
Username: Kakadu

Post Number: 41
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Saturday, June 09, 2007 - 10:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am very worried for you. I hope that you are not getting into a bad situation. A wild half-arab should not cost so much that payments are needed. I have had a handfull of free ones in the last couple years in fact.

You asked for advice, and that is the ONLY reason I am saying anything so if you don't want to hear this please feel free to ignore it.

A wild half arab is only worth about $200 in a private sale, and thats pushing it. I don't know where you are but here at auction a horse like that would probably run through at $20-$40. Arabs are smart and sensitive. As many people said handeling and experiance is what makes them good horses. A horse this age with no handeling or experiance is going to be a TON of work just to get it up to the level it should be on. It may never get over some of the fears now totally rooted in it's head. It is not that it can't be done, but its going to be 1000Xs the work of a horse that was raised the correct way.
The next thing to note is that buying an animal from a private individual is not rescuing it. When a person is keeping 4 horses in a small area and one is THIN you have to realize that no matter what they say they made the CHOICE to get into that situation. If they sell this horse (that was probably given to them for free, really I can't tell you how many untouched arabs I am offered every year) then they will see that they did indeed make a profit and they will just get another to take its place. Now there is a chance that this woman's mother died and left her a bunch of horses with no land...or some other situation where she crammed a bunch of animals into a tiny paddock through no fault or selfishness of her own...but its usually not the case. And is she profits she MAY not do it again, but probably... Please think this through. Look at what you have invested so far and ask if you should walk away. If this horse doesn't work out it is going to be next to impossible to resale. Again, you can't GIVE away wild arabians in many cases. I have been breeding and selling arabians for several years and the market is non-existant for anything but the dead broke kid friendly or world champion halter.
So, if you bring this horse home you are likely going to have an animal that you can't get near with a halter (years of reinforecement of the fear that awful things happen in a halter). You will have a FULL GROWN horse that has learned that occasionally people go for its legs and attack it and it has to fight that. What about trailering? Its going to be a LONG time before this horse will be ready for a trainer even. Before you take a horse to a trainer it should be perfect on all the basics. A good trainer won't even work on a horse that does not have Manners 101 down. And its going to take the trainer a lot longer to work with an animal that is new to the idea of learning from and working with people.

I personally would RUN from this situation. There are great dead-broke, been there done that arabians and other breeds for $1000 up. You can get a loved, handled, ready to break arabian with papers for $500 easily. In fact, you can go to Arabians Ltd and buy Thee Desperado yearling geldings for I think $1250. Thee Desperado's stud fee alone is $5000. But there is NO market except for WORLD CHAMPS and the totally broke riding horses so they just sell them at a loss ot avoid upkeep.

Be careful and think really really hard what you want? This will likely NOT be a horse that you will ever feel safe riding or be able to trust.

DO NOT buy without a PPE.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 115
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 09, 2007 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think I didn't give enough information in my last post. Her price is only $300. I gave the lady $100 last night basically to hold her for me, but under the condition that I can back out at any time. She said she didn't trailer because of her experience with the "trainer" so I agreed to pay the rest when we picked her up IF I still decide to go through with the sale. She's going to work on getting her to load over the next week or two.

She's really not a wild horse. She can be handled. In fact, she walked right up to the lady when she went into the paddock to get her. I'm pretty confident in my abilities to turn her into a riding horse. Seriously, my only concern is with her weight. Or lack there-of, I should say. And you're right, I have no way of knowing if this lady is being truthful with me. Believe me, I didn't get much sleep last night rolling all this around in my head.

Thank you so much for your concern! I really appreciate the honesty of everyone on this board.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 116
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 09, 2007 - 11:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh yeah, PPE = pre-purchase exam, right? Definitely!
 

Marti Langley
Neonate
Username: Pair_o_dice

Post Number: 10
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Saturday, June 09, 2007 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You know, for $300 I think she is worth it. I think she be thankful for a good home and good groceries and love you forever, but that is just my humble opinion. Once you earn her trust and respect , the rest will be a piece of cake. She is a cutie, too. A vet exam is always a good idea, if you have any doubts.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 118
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 10, 2007 - 05:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Marti, I appreciate your humble opinion! I'm still going back and forth, but my husband and girls say get her! I really don't think I'll be making a mistake and I know we can give her what she needs. I just want to do what's best for her and I don't think being where she is now is it. Of course, I realize I'm basing this all on what my heart says and that doesn't mean it's necessarily it's the right thing to do. I'm just so confused!
 

JANE OLNEY
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 281
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, June 11, 2007 - 12:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer-OOPS! I didn't look at this thread until now...I am not familiar with Arabs, so I ignored it. Have you spoken with the trainer that had her for a while?
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 119
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Monday, June 11, 2007 - 08:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

No, I didn't think of that. I should look into that because then I could find out if the owner is being truthful about why she's so thin. Thanks!
 

JANE OLNEY
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 289
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer, did you get her?
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 129
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Wednesday, June 20, 2007 - 04:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We're leaving right now to go get her! I let you know how it goes!
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 217
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 21, 2007 - 10:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer- good luck, be careful.. you just never know what that horse has been exposed to and how she may react. I saw a red flag when I saw that you wrote that she "doesn't trailer".. I guess IF you can get her home and you don't mind staying there, that would not be a problem.. I hope it all works out for you..keep us posted. Ev
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 130
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Friday, June 22, 2007 - 08:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She's here! It did require a sedative to get her on the trailer, but she's home safe and sound and our pony couldn't be happier!

I am really concerned about how emaciated she looks. She currently wasn't getting any grass and I hope I introduce her to it properly. Right now we have her confined to a small cement area with hay and I figured I'd wait until she had her fill of that before turning her out on the grass for about an hour. I figured I would do this two or three times a day, gradually increasing her time on pasture. Does that sound like a good plan?

I really do appreciate everyone's concern and advice! Thanks!
 

JANE OLNEY
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 293
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, June 22, 2007 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, that's what I do. I fill with hay first.

I don't know much about giving grain as well to an emaciated horse. It seems like you would need calories without the protein/sugar, because it may be too much with the grass. I am sure someone knows all about that out there! If there are no answers, search for a rescue facility, call and ask what they do.
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 401
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, June 22, 2007 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer....so glad that she and you arrived home safely. Don't forget to worm her too....Doubt if they did that either. Lucky Lucky horse to have you as her new caretaker!
 

L Detweiler
Neonate
Username: Msfarab

Post Number: 9
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, June 24, 2007 - 03:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Jennifer,
You will get her to adjust to your routine. Go easy on introducing her to grass, especially if she has not had any and would maybe get the PELLET wormer SAFEGUARD for now so you can feed it to her and not stress with the PASTE type especially if she was hard to bridle, as you said the lady could not do that.

You can buy a weight tape and see how much she weighs now... www.kvvet.com or jeffersequine.com
and take plenty of photos to make a record of how she is doing. I would also add soaked shredded beet pulp --about 3 cups per meal, with either powdered RICE BRAN or the Rice Bran oil supplement to add calories to her diet for now, and LITTLE grain to start with, and get a good quality grain mix or pellet.

We have had several UN-handled Arabians and part Arabians given to us or we purchased to train and they were just FINE after being treated well and we used consistent training methods.

Lead her around your place and soon she will catch on you are noone to fear. We do not really advocate hand feeding, but know plenty of people who DO reward with horse cookies, carrots or sliced apples and still have all 10 fingers.

We have not found our Arabians to be stupid or hot or crazy, as many suggest, and ours do not mind crossing water, as they all have access to streams, ravines, ponds and other natural water areas. One of our stallions is the only A-RAB in a warmblood stable... in eventing & dressage training.... and everyone there LOVES him... and CAN'T believe he is a stallion, as he is so gentlemanly and quiet, and that we can collect for AI breedings (shipped semen)in his stall or in the aisle of the stable without a mare IN heat in front of him. Keep us posted on how you are doing.
msfarab, PA
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 131
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 11:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've got some photos of our new girl. We decided to call her Stella after the children's book Stellaluna. I already have Luna so we thought Stella would be a good match!

Well, so far, she has been wonderful! The difference in her behavior at her former home as opposed to ours is night and day. Getting her away from those people and that environment has made all the difference. They said she wasn't very good about getting her hooves done, that she went "ballistic" when being sprayed with fly spray and was very head shy. I witnessed a couple of those statements ring true when watching her be handled by that woman, but I've had no problems with her. Her hooves have gotten trimmed with the help of my girls hand feeding her hay through the gate; she doesn't like to be sprayed, but does not go ballistic; and I can rub her all over her head and ears without a flinch. I was even able to paste worm her with ease. I have not tried to bridle her yet, though, as I'm just staying with groundwork exercises right now. I've given her a few lunging lessons and the first time she did rear a little only because she had no idea what I was asking of her. I was very patient, did not overreact and she caught on so quickly, I just can't believe it!

She's about 14.2 hands and her estimated weight is 700 lbs!!!

I have no regrets getting her. She has the sweetest personality and I think she already knows she's in a much better place. She nickers whenever we go out to see her and it's so touching!

http://s168.photobucket.com/albums/u194/black_opal_photos/

Oh yeah, I do have a question. I've never owned a white horse before and am noticing that her nose is getting pink. Is it okay to put our girls' sunscreen on her? I can't thank you all enough for you help and support!
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 409
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 11:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer....I see lots of potential in that girl! Under your great care she will blossom I am sure. She has a kind eye...I don't see a wild thing there. Keep us updated!
 

L Detweiler
Nursing Foal
Username: Msfarab

Post Number: 11
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, June 25, 2007 - 08:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

GREAT! we find the Arabians tend to listen to the soft voice and understand your "mood" so when you are feeling low they will comfort you and when you are feeling a little mad they will not want you to mess with them.

Great on getting feet done and wormer. Repeat in about 4 weeks on wormer again as they probably did not do a good job there.

WHITE/PINK noses need waterproof cream. I use people/kids 45 SPF WATERPROOF SPORT BLOCK as it stays on, OR just get Zinc Oxide, like the lifeguards use and smear it on your palm and then can feed her carrots and slip it on her nose and she won't mind at all.
Great job. Keep taking photos, you will remember for a long time.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 134
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Wednesday, June 27, 2007 - 09:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you ladies for your encouragement! We're enjoying her so much and I can't wait to see her all filled out. I'll definitely keep you updated!
 

Elsie Steedley
Neonate
Username: Horseey

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Tuesday, July 03, 2007 - 11:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm a arabian person and I like her. I think you did just fine.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 139
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Wednesday, July 04, 2007 - 07:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks! I've been doing a lot of groundwork with Stella and had the saddle on her for the first time yesterday. She's doing great and I plan to get on her within the next few days.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 142
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 03:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Stella update! I've added three photos to my album to show Stella's present state. She is filling out nicely. I've been riding her for about a week now and she's really coming along. For the first ride I fitted her with a loose ring snaffle, but it didn't fit correctly so I've been using a hackamore and she responds very well to it.

http://s168.photobucket.com/albums/u194/black_opal_photos/
 

Jenny Ireland
Nursing Foal
Username: Jenny_i

Post Number: 15
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow Jennifer - I too think you are doing a great job and will end up with a great little mare. I also rescued a four year old Polish Arabian some 13 years ago who had been badly abused, was head-shy, would spin if you went behind him and was terrified of anything and everything. He is a well adjusted, affectionate, kind and great trail horse today with all the confidence in the world. I did pay a large amount for him, but when I saw him and was told he was for sale, there was a kind of plea in his eye to get him the heck out of there. Never regreted the decision. Amazing what some firm, gentle and consistent handling can do. I, for one, would love to see what your mare looks like in another two months. Unrecognizable I bet. She looks an honest mare and will end up totally devoted to you and your family. Great job.
 

Beth Walker
Weanling
Username: Bbhorses

Post Number: 39
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Sunday, July 15, 2007 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer, Stella looks great, you have done wonders with her in the past 4 weeks.She looks like she is filling out nicely, and will be a wonderful mare. Any new pics of Luna?
 

deborah bills
Neonate
Username: Jinty123

Post Number: 10
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Monday, July 16, 2007 - 12:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You did the right thing. Well done you. She looks amazing. I rescued a little 14hh cob mare who is now about to give birth(we didnt know she was in foal). With a kind hand and good food and care, trust can come very easily. You should be really proud. Debbie. uk.
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 143
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Monday, July 16, 2007 - 06:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you everyone! We are so pleased with her. I try to work with her every day for a couple of hours and am so amazed at how quickly she learns something new. The only problem I have is when I first bring her out to work with her, it takes a while to get her focused on me as she is so bonded with our pony she's too busy looking for him.

I'm glad to hear others have taken in a horse in need. We were advised not to get her by a few people, but I have no regrets. Jenny, what you said about the "plea in his eye" was the same with her. I kept looking at the two headshots I had of her and couldn't get that look in her eyes out of my head. Then, when we went to see her and I saw how she lived that feeling nagged at me even more!

Beth, I went to get a Luna fix last week and forgot my camera. Uuggh! I'll have to have my mom send me some to post. I may get back up there this week, but they're almost two hours away so I'll see. I really miss my "baby girl" and am amazed by how much she has grown every time I see her.
 

JANE OLNEY
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 299
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, July 16, 2007 - 11:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer-
I will be checking back for weaning stories!

Beautiful girl!
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 193
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2008 - 11:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, I thought maybe some of you would like to see Stella a year later. The previous post links to my album don't work anymore as I changed them around so here is the new link:

http://s168.photobucket.com/albums/u194/black_opal_photos/Stella%20pics/

They're in reverse order. The first five were taken today and then you can see the dates on the other pictures with the very last one where she has the green leg wraps on taken the day we brought her home.
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1820
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 10:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer~What a wonderful job you have done with her! One very lucky horse! She is beautiful. Thanks for sharing, made my day
 

Laurie A Beltran
Breeding Stock
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 309
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 11:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

JENNIFER,
Also being an Arabian owner for over 25 years I can tell you JOB WELL DONE!

Cheers
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 620
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jennifer-

She is beautiful! Good job! How old is she again, and what is her job this summer?

Jane
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 196
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 09:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks girls! It certainly has been a rewarding experience. I had my previous mare, Star, for 22 yrs. and even though I could do anything on her and she'd go anywhere I wanted, if I went out to the pasture and she knew I wanted her, she'd run the other way. After having Stella I realize I never really had a good bond with Star. Stella will walk right up to me every time and she always has a nicker for me. I just truly believe she's grateful that we took her away from that place.


(Message edited by black_opal on July 19, 2008)
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 197
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2008 - 05:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jane, she's six years old and she is just my country road partner right now. I enjoy peaceful rides with her and I can stop and chat with neighbors (something else I couldn't do with Star, she was too antsy to stand still). Now, she's certainly not perfect! She can be spooky about things along the road (although cars don't bother her) and I still haven't been able to get her willingly into the trailer, but that's okay, it'll happen in time. When it does, I'd like to take her a few miles down the road where I hear there are great trails. She also tends to be herd bound and does not like to leave Luna and Ogre, but once they're out of our sight, she's fine. I also pony Luna from her often. I can show you a picture of that even though I look awful and I'm riding in crocks...shhh!

[IMG]http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u194/black_opal_photos/Luna%20album/stellaJul y08012-1.jpg[/IMG]
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 621
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2008 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, there you are!!!! Nice! Keep up the good work.
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 622
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2008 - 08:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I wish you lived down the road.
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 623
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, July 19, 2008 - 08:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Woody is at the trainers learning to square up with each stop....and behave...and will be picked up before the Aug 2nd appy show in Lansing. He is also starting his showmanship training. I am hoping my daughter will decide to do this next one. I just have to buy an outfit.....
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 198
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Sunday, July 20, 2008 - 09:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I wish we lived close, too. I'd like to have someone to ride with. Our oldest daughter isn't comfortable riding Ogre on the roads. Where in Lansing is the show? My parents live near Lansing and maybe I'll plan a trip to their place that weekend and mosey on over to the show.
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 625
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Tuesday, July 22, 2008 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is at the Michigan State facility. I would love to see you there!
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 201
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 - 12:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our oldest daughter is staying at the lake with Grandpa this week and we'll be picking her up on Sat. so I won't be able to make it to the show. Let me know of any future shows you'll be attending there, though!
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 626
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 08:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I guess it will be next year.

My 12 yr daughter is all set to show him in the halter, color, and some showmanship classes. YEA!!! I don't have to do it! After $200 at the tack shop, she will look sharp.

We wll go work him tomorrow, then go to the show Sat.

I hope he behaves and there are no tears. I will post pictures!! He is a super sweet guy.

Thanks for being a Woody fan.

Jane
 

Jennifer Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Black_opal

Post Number: 202
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 10:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll be checking the yearling thread for those pictures!
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1833
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, July 31, 2008 - 12:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Count me in on the Woody Fan Wagon! He is one of my faves :-)
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 627
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Saturday, August 02, 2008 - 08:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK, check the yearling thread!



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