MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Need advice on breeding older, multi-parous mare

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 2 » Need advice on breeding older, multi-parous mare « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Rowena S.
Weanling
Username: Rowena

Post Number: 21
Registered: 04-2011
Posted on Tuesday, September 06, 2011 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK, I have a 22 yr old TB broodmare that has had at least 5 foals, that I know of. Her last one is currently 3 yrs old. She was bred the next 2 years after the last foal, but failed to settle and was retired as a broodmare. She only came into my possession last winter, but she has special familial meaning to me, and I would love to try and get her bred one last time next year.

The stallion she was bred to (but did not take)was also older, and is now 23 yrs old. I do know that she has at least a couple cycts lurking around in there. The vet I use is the same her previous owner uses, and while not a theriogenologist (did I spell that right? ), she is extremely knowledgeable about breeding and knows the inside of this mare very well. I mentioned it in passing to her when she was out recently to stitch up a naughty yearling who got in trouble, and she mentioned there were several things we could do to try and help her take next year. I would probably like to breed her back to a TB, to hopefully get a filly to carry on her genes. However, I might choose an Irish Draught and then could use cooled semen.

First on the vet's list was to try a younger stallion, then she also mentioned using Regumate. She's coming back out this Friday to take stitches and staples out of said yearling, and I want to talk with her more in-depth about breeding my old mare. What questions do I really need to ask her, aside from having a standard breeding soundness exam and culture/biopsy done? This would be the first time I've attempted breeding a mare this age, so want to do everything I can to help. But if it's just not in the cards, then so be it, and she'll have a good retirement with me. Thanks for any advice anyone can give!
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 3400
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2011 - 12:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The chances are that the blame for failure to conceive is to be laid at your mare's door rather than the stallion's despite his age. The only caveat on that point is of course that the stallion does still have to be producing viable sperm. The incidence of failure to produce adequate numbers of viable sperm owing to age vs. unsuitable uterine environment being the cause of failure of pregnancy establishment is however a far smaller percentage.

So, let's look at you mare:

Certainly a good breeding soundness evaluation including a biopsy and culture are a good starting point. You should also evaluate external reproductive conformation with a view to the possible need for a Caslick's procedure. Presuming that all things are considered adequate in those evaluations, the next major point that I would consider of importance is that the mare is almost certainly suffering from delayed uterine clearance. This is a condition where the mare's uterus is unable to adequately clear fluids and/or irritants associated with estrus and breeding. It is extremely common and leads to endometritis, with associated pregnancy failure. It is usually quite easily managed with the use of ecbolics such as are presented in the article we have on use of oxytocin. It is this protocol that we would follow LONG before considering the use of Regumate - in fact, pretty much any theriogenologist will tell you that there is a considerable overuse of progestin therapy to "support pregnancy", so it does cause a little bit of alarm in me when you indicate that your veterinarian is immediately reaching for the Regumate bottle... :-( You can read more about the (ab)use of progestin therapy in our article about it to be found here. A good question to ask your vet might perhaps be for a specific reason as to why she recommends Regumate... based upon what clinical evaluation. And don't accept a nebulous "well it's helped in other instances". Helped how??? You should also discuss the oxytocin protocol - and note that it's not just a single shot per day, but requires intensive therapy at least every 6 hours, and possible for the entire duration of estrus depending upon how problematic the mare is!

Successfully breeding older mares and establishing pregnancy can certainly be difficult, and there are definitely instances where it's time to throw in the towel, but age alone is not the reason. One needs to see some specifically defined problems such as a grade III biopsy or persistent fluid in the uterus that will not clear even after thorough and suitable treatment.
 

Rowena S.
Weanling
Username: Rowena

Post Number: 22
Registered: 04-2011
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2011 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, Jos. I know the stallion owner (also my mare's previous owner) said that he did settle 4 mares this year, and pretty sure that that's all she bred, so I guess he's still batting 1000 despite his age...

She did say that when she was last trying to get the mare pregnant, the vet would ultrasound her and could predict ovulation very accurately, and then she would only cover the mare one time. Would multiple covers, as is usually done, be more productive to helping her take? Or would the increased covering add to the irritation of the uterus and compound the effects of the delayed clearance?

I know I've seen you "preach" about the overuse of Regumate on here, so that's why I specifically mentioned that my vet had also mentioned it in my original post. The mare is an absolute doll to handle, and I know she would tolerate the oxytocin shots to an extent. If this route is taken, at what point can you decide she can be weaned off the oxytocin? That being said, if it turned out she needed to be kept on it for the duration, personally I wouldn't want to put her through that every day, just for the chance of getting a live baby. I'm not doing this for money reasons, merely personal, and it's not worth it to me to make her miserable for 11 months just to make me happy in the end.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 3401
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, September 07, 2011 - 08:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You want the minimum number of breedings possible. In a perfect world, you would be doing AI as well, rather than live cover, and using only the required number of sperm (500 million progressively motile, morphologically normal sperm). Sperm are an irritant to the uterus and the more that are put in there (and the more often), the more irritation there will be and with an older mare, that represents a problem.

Oxytocin use is not particularly traumatic for the mare as long as she is not one of the rare mares that goes ballistic with injections. The volume being used is only 1 ml and one can use an insulin syringe, which has a very small needle. Most mares don't even notice the injection, or just react as though it was a fly bite. As far as the effect of oxytocin - it is the hormone that is released during teasing and breeding, so it is nothing unnatural. With these older delayed uterine mares, you are merely increasing the hormone level, which in fact may be lacking.

Immediate suggestion of Regumate use without any other evaluation always makes me a little "hinky" about the abilities of the person doing the recommending... :-(
 

Rowena S.
Weanling
Username: Rowena

Post Number: 23
Registered: 04-2011
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2011 - 07:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks again for providing me with such a detailed explanation. I'll take notes when I speak to the vet tomorrow and "report" back to you to see if something doesn't sound right.

I checked the AAEP website to do a search for a vet specializing in theriogenology, but there are none practicing in my immediate area. Despite me living in a very horsey area, with some pretty high dollar farms. I contacted one who practices about 30 miles away, but she said it would be too far for her to drive for only one customer (and I only have 2 broodmares), so I'm stuck with what I've got.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 3402
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Thursday, September 08, 2011 - 10:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Did you check the American College of Theriogenologists web site listing? AAEP may not have them all.
 

Rowena S.
Weanling
Username: Rowena

Post Number: 24
Registered: 04-2011
Posted on Monday, September 12, 2011 - 07:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK, I was able to ask a few more questions to the vet, but she was already running late when she got to my place so didn't have time to go in-depth. She started off by saying the first thing would be to do a biopsy (which I already knew needed to be done). She said pending a good outcome for that, she again brought up the Regumate.

Now, the silver lining to this is that, over the weekend, I happened to bring up the subject of repro work to an aquaintance of mine. She told me of another vet that does service my area, but I had never heard of. (and by the by, the web link you gave me didn't give any help, unfortunately) This vet specializes in breeding, but not sure if he's actually a theriogenologist. He has done things as advanced as embryo transfer, so the prospect is looking good. I'm planning on giving his office a call this week to try and speak with him. I think my mare is already starting to transistion into anestrus, so the biopsy will probably have to wait until next spring. But at least I can ask his opinion and advice and go from there. Thank you again very much for all your help, Jos, and for hosting such an invaluable website. It is much appreciated!



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US