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Mare allows yrl foal to nurse - want to re-breed - will she take??

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Problem Mares - Volume 2 » Mare allows yrl foal to nurse - want to re-breed - will she take?? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Deb Anderson
Neonate
Username: Wildcat_acres

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2008 - 04:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our 9 YO mare is allowing her yearling foal to nurse (once successfully weaned). This was her first foal and we want to re-breed. Will she take and if so - once she is in foal will she stop allowing the yearling to nurse?? Our facility is limited and not really conducive to separate. The mare is really good and threw a great foal. She is unable to be ridden this year - therefore we planned to get one more foal. Any help/suggestions are greatly appreciated. We plan to keep the mare and yearling apart through foal confirmation and are hoping nature will kick in. Thank you for your help
 

Deb Anderson
Neonate
Username: Wildcat_acres

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2008 - 04:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OOOPs - probably should have asked this question uder another heading. She was easy to settle the first time - - still any help is appreciated.
 

Colleen Beck
Breeding Stock
Username: Gypsycreations

Post Number: 445
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 25, 2008 - 08:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She shouldn't have any problem settling while nursing (so long as she is in good flesh). I've had mares who were willing to nurse their older (and previously weaned) foals throughout their next pregnancy. However, this is not in the best interest of the mare (obviously!). Nature usually does kick in when she is closer to foaling. If there is any way to separate them, I would suggest you do. A pipe panel between them will not work as she will stand close enough for him/her to nurse through it. Many people on this forum can attest to that as well.

Best of luck!
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 332
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, May 26, 2008 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Deb,
You need to get that yearling off its mama! "Contrive" some sort of set-up or sell one of them if that isn't possible. And you absolutely don't need a yearling (then two-year-old) in there sucking off of mama when a new baby hits the ground. Talk about unnecessary stress to mama and a health risk to all. "Letting nature take its course (hoping it will?) is not a sound practice.

Damage to your mare due to "rough" nursing is also a VERY real possiblity. I have a absolutely gorgeous, well-blooded broodmare that the people never weaned her foal and these babies aren't very easy on mama once they get some size on them. The mare ended up with ligament damage to one teat and will never be able to nurse a foal on that side again. Her bag is constantly full of serum and the availability of a nursemare is a necessity when this mare foals.

How did you wean this baby in the first place? How long did you keep them apart? i.e., what does "once successfully weaned" mean? Did you let the mare dry up?
 

Deb Anderson
Neonate
Username: Wildcat_acres

Post Number: 5
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, May 26, 2008 - 03:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Catherine,

I appreciate your comments. The mare was completely dry (2 months without), but is one of those types that "needs" attention. She is the bottom of the pecking order, and I think this is her form of attention. Our vet is Amazed she is still allowing this and has the same view - if the mare is not "punishing" the foal - why should he give it up? Ideally, we would physically separate them (so they could not even see/hear) each other, but this is not possible. The best I can do is a physical separation where they can still see each other. I can not break the "mental" bond with our physical conditions. I am thinking of trying rubber studs/spikes on the halter to bump the mare and make it uncomfortable - any experience with that form of weaning?
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 608
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, May 26, 2008 - 08:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, I have to say that my 17 mo old still nurses. We took Mom out today for some harness work (no problem, two neighs). When we put them back together, he had to nurse for less than 30 seconds. It was probably less than that. They live together, but it is important to us to separate them at every chance.

Our big question is: Do we leave baby at home when we go places with Mom, or do we take him and make him stand tied at the trailer....and make her just do her thing...or leave him at home. I guess it should be a mixture of it all. He was separated from Mom last summer for a month or so.

Lately he has been left home for 3 hours twice weekly. Mom has fun out with her friends and baby seems fine. He just may nurse for a few seconds when they are back together.

Is nursing such a bad thing? I am La Leche person by the way.....

What harm is there in it? I don't not take her places because of the baby. She is going to the fair for a week without him. Will she let him nurse when she gets back? Maybe. Will we be standing in the background making fun of him? YES!...
 

Jane Olney
Breeding Stock
Username: Shotsnurse1

Post Number: 610
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, May 26, 2008 - 08:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She has no bag and he only nurses for a few seconds when we see it.
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 336
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 27, 2008 - 08:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I suppose if you want to risk socialization/behavioral problems for the foal as well as udder damage to the mare, hey, who am I to say?

Just a personal observation---perhaps if your facility isnt' set up to properly wean foals, etc., then you should re-think getting into the breeding biz.
 

Deb Anderson
Neonate
Username: Wildcat_acres

Post Number: 7
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 27, 2008 - 06:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Za Zing - - - Ouch!!! I Never said I was getting into the breeding business. These are for our own use. They are of top quality QH breeding - - not a "just to happen pasture breeding". I am Completely in favor of selective breedign - not just reproduction "because". BTW - I am also pro slaughter
 

Phyllis Schroder
Yearling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 90
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 28, 2008 - 12:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Deb,
If you can't split their turnout area or such then what about leaving one stalled while the other is turned out to keep them seperated?
There are a multitude of problems you can have from this situation. Everything from older foal being aggressive and hurting or killing the new foal, major seperation problems in the future, damage to the mare and more.
I've seen this in the past and sometimes it was nothing short of disastorous and i wouldn't want to see anyone or their horses have to go through that.
If there's anyway to seperate them, find it. Even if it's just physically and they can still see each other that's fine, let 'em holler they'll give it up eventually.

Jane, you are very fortunate that your guys are not having seperation problems. On a whole that seems to be an exception to the rule in these situations.
 

Dorthy Brown
Breeding Stock
Username: Dodib

Post Number: 299
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 28, 2008 - 11:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare and her yearling foal are in teh same pasture together-- also was successfully weaned and put back together. She also nurses occasionally if you want to call it that-- she has no milk its just for comfort. I rebred momma last month and she NOW finally is starting to push the yearling away and not let her try to nurse--all worked out fine for me
As long as she is in good weight I don't think it will hurt anything



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