MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Stomach distress in pregnant mare

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Methods » Stomach distress in pregnant mare « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Barbara Lewis
Weanling
Username: Baraka

Post Number: 28
Registered: 06-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 28, 2009 - 02:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have moved this from another section.

My mare, due to have her first foal on April 12,
is having some unusual problem. Six days ago (Sunday) she was mildly colicky, so was given Banamine. She would not eat or drink, and only picked at a few bites of hay after the Banamine took affect. She would, however, graze.

I assumed it was just the baby making her uncomfortable, and expected her condition to improve as soon as the foal shifted positions. At feeding that evening, she didn't eat, and seemed uncomfortable. You could hear her stomach rumbling from several feet away. More Banamine was given.

The vet was called the next morning. Temperature was slightly low, everything else checked out okay (ample poops, etc.), baby was active, stomach was still rumbling, and she was diagnosed with a hyperactive gastric tract. (Yep!). Treatment recommended was 5 cc Banamine 2x per day.

By the next day, she was eating better but not cleaning up her food, and drinking very little water - yet poops were ample and moist. She didn't start eating much until yesterday, except to graze, but her symptoms remain. After eating this morning, for example, she seemed hungry, cleaned up her food, and immediately showed colic signs in her body language. I gave Banamine. With that and some other distractions, she seemed to feel better.

She has seemed to improve daily, however tonight she seemed worse. She was down, had rolled, but stood up when I came into the barn. Her body was arched and stretched until a new dose of Banamine took affect. Oddly, even when uncomfortable, she nibbled at her food. After the banamine, she ate well. She hasn't been breathing hard, nose is not pinched, she's just very uncomfortable without the banamine.

I'm concerned that there might be something else going on. The only thing I can think of is that new green grass is coming on like crazy. We've had lots and lots of rain, so it's full of moisture - hopefully explaining the noticeable drop in the amount she is drinking.

I'm giving her Probio, and may start Zantac, unless you recommend against it. She's being kept in tonight, off the grass, to see if that helps.

I acknowledge that you are not a veterinarian, and ask your advice as an experienced horseman and reproduction expert. Is there anything about a normal pregnancy that might cause this problem? She still has gastric noises, although not as much as that first night - normal activity, I would say. At least you have to now use your ear on her stomach, or a stethoscope. What would you do if a veterinarian were not available? We have 1 equine vet within 80 miles, and he is out of town.



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US