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Pasture breeding

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Breeding Methods » Pasture breeding « Previous Next »

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nonenonenoneFirst timer help Brooke03-03-06  10:11 am
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Elizabeth (205.207.148.253)
Posted on Tuesday, November 27, 2001 - 06:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ive herd of horse breeders who let there stallion loose with a herd of mares for the breeding season. I want to know if the stallion could also be used for riding and breeding to outside mares, or would he just be to wild and stuff.

I would also like to know a bit more about pasture breeding, iam going to become a horse breeder and i think the horses should 'let nature take its course' on there own.
thanks
 

tsruninqh (198.107.233.26)
Posted on Thursday, November 29, 2001 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There are a lot of breeders that pasture breed. Letting "nature take its course" is all well and fine, HOWEVER it can be very dangerous for the horses involved. Some mares are very nasty to studs even when in heat. There are studs seriously injured and even killed in these situations every year. Being able to ride and breed him to other mares really depends on the studs disposition. My opinion is if he is not easily handled at all times he should be a gelding.
 

stallionowner (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 61.68.139.254
Posted on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 04:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a first season stallion who is a P/b Qh. he is very quiet and gentle, was being hand served but I too wanted him to pasture breed, as he still didnt really know too much about the girls, after I had bred him to an old broodmare ( better to have an old experienced broodmare to run him with for startes) I turned them out together in his paddock, for a while he tried mount several times but could not drop his member as he had ejaculated before and could not do so which resulted in him getting a bit frustrated ie yelling. But after a few hours he learned and settled down, but I did find that this old mare had taken too much of a liking to him and was demanding more than what he could handle as he was really tired. So for his physical state I took the mare away.

Whilst the mare in heat was with him I also turned a mare out with him that he had 'bred' a week before. As all the mares he has ever been presented to he has been aloud to serve and was getting a bit excited in hand so I did want him to learn that not all mares are going to let him do that. I put her in his paddock and he came charging over, yelling, dropped himself and went to mount her straight away, but she squelled and kick her legs out, told him no and he got the message and had no trouble running him with mares apart from ones in heat as he overworks himself and lost alot of weight. I watch them for the first hour and if I thought the mare or stallion was in danger I would seperate them but I have not had to do so.

He is fine for me to ride and handle in general, after serving 6 mares now, I can ride him past mares, I can ride him with other riders on mares and no problem at all, at first he did get excited, didnt mount just whistled at her and dropped himself. I have invested in a pair of spurs only to gently at first correct him if he does act at all like a stallion when being ridden as the back of my boot does not send him a strong enough message.

As ive taken him out more hes learned and only occasionally nickers (which I correct) so shortly I imagine he will learn to show no stallion behavior at all.

But thats just my stallion as he has a very gentle and quiet temperment, as not all stallions can be ridden or even handled by women but it just depends on the horse there all different, different personalities ect.
 

Gynna Meiller
Weanling
Username: Jw_kings_excalibur

Post Number: 36
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Saturday, December 17, 2005 - 07:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I do a control pasture breed. I put the mare in a padock next to my 3 yr old stallion to see if she is willing to let him sweet talk and kiss on her..when she is willing, she is taken into his padock and I ( and only I EVER)handle him and ask him to stand until the mare is released and settled down then he goes and does his foreplay and business. when he is done I remove the mare and clean him up. I started him with marton mares that I knew had been pasture bred several time without problems and his fourth mare was a young maiden and he settled her well without biting or kicking going on..He does not talk while under saddle..in fact he ignores mares when working or under his work halter...like the one person stated..he is very gentle all the time. But every stallion just like every horse, is vastly different. Most of the handlers I know that work with stallions are women too..less push me pull you attitude with all that testastrone I guess..LOL



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