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Bitting Gelding

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Bitting Gelding « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 34
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Sunday, May 14, 2006 - 12:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi I need some help!
I have this gelding he is a beautiful bay quarter horse and is really loving but, there is one ane only one bad habbit he has. He is so bad at bitting people and if anyone has actually been bitten by a 2 year old horse you know you have been bitten. If you meet him in person you would see that he wants you to pet him and love him but, I am afaird to love him up to much without watching and just wating for him to bit me.
If anyone has advise that could help me stop his bitting problem I would really take the advice.
Thanks!
 

Fred H. Moyer
Weanling
Username: Fmoyer

Post Number: 25
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 02:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Personally there are way too many good horses out there to put up with that dangerous behavior. Cost just as much to feed a bad one as it does a good one. Kicking or biting gets you a front row seat to the inside of a dog food can. Just my opinion.
 

Lori
Nursing Foal
Username: Shstables

Post Number: 18
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 10:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ground work! And more ground work!! How long have you had him? Is he an orphan?
Absolutely no treats. Ever.
Be firm and attentive. When he swing his head make sure he hits himself and punishes himself. I make sure all of mine learn to stay in their own space and not mine. Push his head away and say no. Carry a dressage whip whenever you lead him with the handle end near his muzzle. If he swings in to bite he will smack his muzzle to the end of the whip and self-correct.
Did I say no treats ever!! Really I mean it!

I will say that Fred is right. Naughty horses tend to end up in bad situations. If he cannot be stopped you cannot keep him.
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 39
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 10:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had him from the minute he was born! I own his mother. I really want to correct this because I really want to keep him for showing. I will try the whip and no treats.
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 41
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 11:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

His name is Danny and mother's name is Diane.
http://s76.photobucket.com/albums/j11/AmandaSchutter/
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 162
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006 - 08:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee young horses can be a problem with nipping and biting and it sounds like he is taking a while to grow up. Don't play with his mouth, unless you are worming/bridling or floating teeth. I find with horses that try to take a chunk out of you, the more you give them attention the wrose they do it. You may think a slap is punishing him but he actually got what he wanted, you to pay attention to him SO there is two ways to go about things with him. Either ignore him (make sure your out of reatch) and don't give him any attention untill he stands there quietly... then reward him with pats. As soon as he goes to nip again, just ignore him (he needs to be tied up so you are safe) or when he goes to bite you, scare and I mean really SCARE, the living day lights out of him (make him think you are going to eat him alive!!!)I had a colt who had a tendancy to take a swipe every now and then ... when he would go for the bite i would shake the lead really hard and make him run backwards by growling and yelling(note he was very soft to presure so he wasnever getting away from me). He would then be an angel for weeks after that. Your bloke is a gelding not a colt ... i would imagine he will get the picture pretty quickly.
 

sandra dillard
Weanling
Username: Magnolia

Post Number: 33
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee, I have to agree with emma, He needs to think "oh my, she may bite back!!, as for Freds comment, That is the most insensitive and horrendous thing someone could say..... Do lots of research and look into clicker training...i haven't tried it with horses but worked WONDERS on a dog with problem behaviors. Google "clicker training horses" and see what comes up.. lots of info out there......good luck!!
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 220
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006 - 02:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee,
A lot of good suggestions for helping your gelding "see the light" have been given. Nipping or biting is rather painful for the one on the receiving end (as you know!).
Best to set this boy up for success vs. failure....
Don't provide him with the opportunity to bite. This means: no hand feeding, no cookies, don't play with his lips or mouth, don't allow him to lick your hand, etc. Leading is to get somewhere, not an invitation to play, and so on.
Handle him when haltered. Handle his head for utiity reasons...such as brushing & cleaning, and general handling (but not to play or love over).
In the event that he does get his teeth on or near you....he needs to get the impression it will be his last act on earth. Swift and memorable for him. Then, go back to what you were doing as if it never happened. Repeat if necessary :-) .
It is easy to forget that these big creatures we love can injure us. While we can take them out of the wild, we will never take the wild out of them....they are animals of instinct and hiearchy. You need to put yourself on the top of the list...providing him the structure will allow him to follow form. He is a 2 yr. old who most likely needs the rules laid down to assist him in behaving. Sometimes, the hardest part is for us (as owners) to follow through.

While Fred's comment may have been a bit sharp...on some level I have to agree with him. A TRULY dangerous animal is a menace and hazard to others. I have had one like that, and will never again. But, there is normally a clear and distinct difference between poor manners and an ill-tempered rouge horse.
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 42
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006 - 04:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

When you say put him in his place do you mean like hitting hard or yelling at him when he doesn't think your going to!
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 163
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Thursday, May 18, 2006 - 09:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee you could never hit him hard enough with your hand to make him think about doing it twice.

You need to scare him half to death so that he thinks next time he does it he may well just finish up dead! I am sure he is pretty quiet to handle on the whole but if you turned into a big green eye monster all of a sudden and really started to rush at him (do not tie him for that obviously ... he needs to be on a long 12 ft lead and make sure he keeps his head at you)yelling waving your arms about and if he doesn't move (which i would be surprised) grab his attention by swatting him hard with the end of the lead and rushing him again ... when you do this keep on him for a short time so he is really starting to think ... Oh hell I have done it now!

You need to become head horse again.

If you have to you could also put some stones in a plastic bottle and have it in your pocket so that as soon as he goes to bite all hell breaks loose. If you do it properly you will only need to correct him a few times and my guess is he will give it up. A good place to do this would be in a round pen so that if he gets away from you, you can still keep after him. Once you think he has the message back off and let him come up to you and stand BUT DO NOT PAT HIm ... if he goes to bite again you didn't do it hard enough the first time so you need to get at him again.
This problem can be fixed!!!!

Keep us all posted!
 

Jan Owen
Yearling
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 70
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2006 - 12:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee, My young gelding went through the same thing. I was there while he was born, imprinted, bonded and loved. He was terrific till he hit 2. Terrible twos. All of sudden he got mouthy and began to bite, especially when he got the reaction he was looking for me jumping away! So I had to think like a horse and send him body language that send NO WAY! If he seems to be getting antsy I give him something to do. I carried a small croup. Never to hit with just the presence of it brougnt respect. I worked on ground manners, respecting my space not hanging on me, not rushing past me, we did lots of "patience" training of standing tied. He is now three and the biting has passed and I can again hug and love on him and then say no more.
Good Luck!
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 44
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, May 19, 2006 - 03:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks I will keep everyone posted I just hope it don't take forever to correct this bitting thing and stuff.
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 49
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well I tried scaring him today when he tried to bit me and it worked. He jumped like he was shoot and the rest of the time I was working with him he was so quite! I will keep you posted Thanks to everyone!
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 164
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 03:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well done Dee .... just keep on your toes and be ready for the next bite .... he will stop it in no time!
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 59
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 02:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I hope so!
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 64
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Saturday, June 03, 2006 - 11:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

UPDATE!
He tried to bite again but, I started yelling and waving my hands in the air and had a bottle of stones that I scared him with. He got so scared that he ran off and triped over his feet and fell down. He is alright but, I think that did the trick because he has not tried to bite again!

Thanks for everyones help on this problem!
It has helped so much.
 

Fred H. Moyer
Weanling
Username: Fmoyer

Post Number: 38
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, June 05, 2006 - 06:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee and Sandra, I apologize. I could have stated that a lot better than I did. My houndsmen side is showing through. If it is a problem that is just manifesting itself due to his age and can eventually be corrected then I hope the very best for you. What I tried to convey, and probably to matter of factly for this forum is this. A horse can inflict serious damage, I'm not talking about brusing only, they can and have bitten noses off, taken chunkcs out of folks, killed folks by kicking. Those two behaviors cannot be tolerated. What if a young child walks within range? Why would you own a horse you are in constant fear of being injured? Do you sell this type of dangerous horse? What happens when you find out the horse you sold down the road has injured or killed someone else? I do hope you can correct this behavior, but if you have a horse that bites out of mean spirtedness and not just because he is going through a youngster stage or because he's spoiled, then what do you do with him? I have an Aunt in MO, about 18 years ago she had her entire chin, half her tongue and half of her lower teeth and jaw, bitten clean off. She was inintensive care for several weeks and has had allot of surgeries since then. And she was what I would consider a horse expert. I just can't see keeping a horse like that around if I have children or may have children around.

That being said I aopolgize for the way I put that accross in my first post.
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 65
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 01:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That's alright Fred! I know you were only tring to get a point through but, I do agree with you on the why would you keep a dangerous horse. I have manage to get the problem under control and also called firends for advise that have been through this kind of thing. I know that it is just a stage of 2 year olds. (Im sure it is!)
He has stopped bitting.
 

Fred H. Moyer
Weanling
Username: Fmoyer

Post Number: 42
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 02:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Glad to hear it :-)
 

Emma
Breeding Stock
Username: Emma

Post Number: 165
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Tuesday, June 06, 2006 - 09:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That is wonderful to hear Dee. I have found that a fall normally knocks the wind out of those silly/cheeky young horses and im not surprised that has stoped him. Well done to you!



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