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Buggy Horses need help for a friend!

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Buggy Horses need help for a friend! « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 28
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 09, 2006 - 03:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have this friend that just recently put two mares into training to pull a buggy. They came back from the trainers and were okay. Until he tried to hook them up to the buggy for practice. They wouldn't do anything that they were supposed to do, they reared up, tired to stike out at him and bite. They just wouldn't do what he asked them to do. The funny thing is that if he took them somewhere else to try to work with them they would do what he wanted them to do. I would try to help him but, I am afaird I would only make the problem worse. I know alot about halter showing horses and breeding I just don't know anything about buggy horses.

Anything would be helpful.
Thanks for anyone who helps.
 

Jennifer D
Neonate
Username: Jennifer

Post Number: 5
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, May 09, 2006 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How soon did the hook them after bringing them home? I have a mare that gets emotional and stressed when moved around, she takes a good week or two to fully adjust. I don't drive her, but she will act really nervous undersaddle for the first time or two when I ride. She has known me from birth, so I attribute it to the move. Once she fully settles in she is good as gold!
 

Dee
Weanling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 30
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 09, 2006 - 08:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He told me he tried to start working them about a week or so after bring them home.
 

Anj Bascom
Yearling
Username: Anj

Post Number: 58
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 10:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee, just my opinion, I would take them back to the trainers and WATCH what they were doing there. MOST trainers will have a training for the owner as well, teaching you what all they taught the horses during the time they had them. The cues, etc. It's the same for driving horses and riding horses. Either that or get my money back.
Just on a personal note, I didn't know anything when I was trying to teach mine to drive, she's only 4 years old, but from the day I put the harness on her, to the day I was driving the buggy around the farm was ONE WEEK. Has your friend tried driving them singely first or just as a team? Maybe the traininer had them working alone or something? Give us some more details. :-)
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 53
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 10:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He has only worked them together as a team I will tell him to work them singely and I think he's been feeding them to much! I can't tell him that though until I know he has for sure. He usally feeds them 2 to 3 flakes of hay with a pound of grain a pieace but, he also lets them out on 100 acres of plain grass. He says he just went up there to the trianers to see how the progress was going with them and he also said that half the time he went up there the real trianer wasn't even there. When he did get the trianer the trianer didn't say if he worked them together or apart! To me it really sounded like the trianer didn't even do anything! Should I tell him to go to the trianer to see what the trianer even did with them?
 

Anj Bascom
Yearling
Username: Anj

Post Number: 64
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 12:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee, definetely! He's put the money into it, he has a right to know WHAT exactly has been done. Good trainers should be keeping a journal of some kind, or be calling every couple days with updates. If I were him, I would find another trainer ASAP! But seriously, he could do this himself on a couple hours a day. He'd save money and he wouldn't end up "retraining" his horses once they came home. I hope I don't offend anyone by saying this, but I've always been kind of anti-trainer anyway. I figure you learn so much more by doing it yourself, and it doesn't do the horse ANY good by going to a trainer then coming home to someone who doesn't know what they're doing. I'm not saying that's the case with your friend, I'm just saying that he should definetely get a couple books and try it himself. Call a few people who drive as well for tips and tricks and things, but ditch the trainer idea. Sounds like whoever he's got them with is not very professional at all.
Also, once they're out in the pasture for the summer, I don't feed mine anything extra unless I give them a treat every now and then. A pound of grain a day is only going to make them hot, which it sounds like is already happening. Grain for a treat, not as an every day meal. Should calm them down a little. How old are these horse? Have they been broke to ride?
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 57
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 12:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks and I agree with you on the trainer thing. It's alot better to learn while teaching the horse! I also thought that it was alot of food to giving a horse while in pasture too. I think they are around 5 or almost 6. Yes they are broke to ride!
I will definetely tell him to try not to feed them that much and I will also tell him to try to train them himself.
 

Anj Bascom
Yearling
Username: Anj

Post Number: 66
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 11:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dee, when I was getting started, I found a TON of things online that helped me a lot. I also contact everyone I could think of within a 30 mile radius who had ever driven horses before and asked them for advice. The hardest part is figuring out how to get the harness on. I haven't worked with teams, but my guess is that if they have never driven before, they need to learn to at least ground drive singly. Or find another one somewhere that knows what they're doing and hook them up one at a time with that one so they can be "taught."
Here's my email breakawaystudio@bresnan.net
I'd be glad to email anything I've learned and pictures of me training my little mare if that will help him. Tell him good luck! :-)
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 58
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That is the part I don't understand!
He has had a team like this before and they never did this before! They were around 8 years of age when he started them but, he can't use them anymore becuase one has died and one has bad feet. The one that is still alive is almost 19 too so that is why he needs to train these two younger horses.
 

Anj Bascom
Yearling
Username: Anj

Post Number: 69
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 03:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Did he have the older two at the same trainers? I would think if he's been driving a team for 11 years he'd be more than qualified to train a new team....?
 

Dee
Yearling
Username: Dee

Post Number: 60
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 24, 2006 - 11:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

He bought them from someone so I don't know if the older ones went to the same trainers or not. He also bought them trained for buggy. I think he could more than likly train them himself too.



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