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Foaling in pasturewith piers or in isolated stall best?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Foaling in pasturewith piers or in isolated stall best? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Kris Moos
Neonate
Username: Kris

Post Number: 6
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, January 12, 2006 - 11:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is it best to let a mare who is not used to being stalled foal in the pasture with her piers (assuming she is comfortable with them) or in her own stall or paddock? What if the mare is not used to being stalled? has not been for 10 years? (free run on 25 acres with lean to.)
 

Gynna Meiller
Yearling
Username: Jw_kings_excalibur

Post Number: 81
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 06:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mares foal in a small grassy padock away from the other mares( I have one that will steal a foal)and she iskept there for three days. They can all see smell and touch each other threw the 5 ft fence but this alows mare and foal to bond and the foal to gain much needed strenghth to run with the mares. My two older broodmares HATE being stalled for foaling. They were pasture foaling mares before I got them and there is no changing it now..I tried! Now my two yr old mustang mare likes being in the stall alone so she may foal in one. Their foaling turnout is in front of the stalls so that they have access to foal inside or out.
Forgot to add, if she is fine with the other horses and the pasture is big enough, there are no geldings or mares that will steal, or injur the foal then the choice is yours. I just prefure not to take the chance unless they have foaled with these horses before.

(Message edited by Jw_kings_excalibur on January 13, 2006)
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 72.56.36.121
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 10:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And I would be worried about not being able to find the mare in the dark when she goes into labor! Especially on 25 acres, how are you going to keep an eye on the mare when she gets close? I foal mine in stalls, but Gynna's set-up also sounds good.
 

Kris Moos
Neonate
Username: Kris

Post Number: 8
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 10:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I live in minnesota, so a grassy pasture is out of the question in late march to early april, it is usually wet or snowy. I have a small pasture that is next to the main pasture, and close to my bedroom window to where i could hear her very well even with windows closed and could look out the window to see her, but i would have to split off half the lean to with round pen panels to give her shelter, my other option is to foal her in the pole shed in a 12 x 24 "stall" but she will not have attached pasture or be able to see the other horses, i will need to lead her to pasture and let he foal follow.

I am just concerned because of the weather(I chose to breed early to have abetter chance of settling her because the previous year she did not settle all year and i started late may) and the fact that when she foaled in a stall previously she foaled standing up, and when she foaled in a stall alone it was battle royal to get her to accept the other horses after 1 week. (she chased them through fences).
Thank you for your input, it is a tough decision for me, this is a highly valuable mare (to me) i have had her 16 years, and this foal is a 3 year in the making foal! I just want to do what would be best...for most other horses...thanks
 

Kris Moos
Neonate
Username: Kris

Post Number: 9
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 10:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

oh i forgot to say she is a "teller" the last 12 hours when she will foal, she becomes very lovey dovey (comin from a mare that hates people in her personla space and walks away she will come to you and crowd you) and her bag completely fills and gets large amounts of wax and her colostrum goes from clear yellow to milky white and she foals...so i am pretty sure i will be able to pick the time.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10418
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 01:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Another concern that I have voiced elsewhere about foaling out in the pasture is that if there is a dystocia, one may be faced with a mare that won't/can't get up, and insufficient lighting. And it's no fun trying to reverse a dystocia by the lights of a pick-up truck... :-(
 

Gynna Meiller
Yearling
Username: Jw_kings_excalibur

Post Number: 82
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 02:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thats why I desinged my barn the way I did. Having that little turnout in front of the stalls is wonderful. Its about 60 ft by 80 ft and is well lit at night if I need it to be. The mares are more confortable out there and I can stay out of the way until I am needed and have a clear veiw no matter where she lays down and they seem to prefure to foal out there and then come into the stall after foaling.
I know that there are big breeders that just let their mares foal out in pasture without a care in the world and most mares do so without problems.. they beleive that a small percentage is okay to loose, but it only takes one thing to make it go horribly wrong and I myslef, cant afford to loose a mare or a foal like some of these bigger breeders. I have seen first hand what happens on some big farms, and I will NEVER own more mares than I personaly can attend to..
 

Kris Moos
Nursing Foal
Username: Kris

Post Number: 13
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 03:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with your view of the big farms, the stallion owner lets her mares foal outside on about 80 acres then brings them in. I cannot afford to lose this or any other mare!
I cheated last year, I bought the mare I had been looking at AFTER she foaled...that was easier, however not nearly as exciting!

I want her close but am undecided about in the barn in 12 x 24 or in a 12 x 12 area (lean to ) that has an attached 40' by 80' pature. I think I will probably make a final decision when time gets closer and i know what the weather will be. We could be 80 degrees and sunny at that time or we could be 15 degrees and a snowstorm, if the latter i will defineatelly be putting her inside a closed building and have my foal blanket and hers ready!

what si DYSToCIA? I have heard it but am unsure of what it is.
I really need to get my own copy of blessed are the broodmares i think, i used to borrow one however my friend moved away, I will have to see what i can do about that this weekend.
thanks guys for your input...its always nice to hear from others!
 

Gynna Meiller
Yearling
Username: Jw_kings_excalibur

Post Number: 84
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Friday, January 13, 2006 - 05:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

dystocia is when the foal is in anything other than the right posistion for birth, like a leg tuned back, upside down or breach, to name a few.
I ordered my copy of Blessed is the Broodmare from Walden Books.
As for your mare..what is she comfortable with? And can you get to here and see her at night in the lean-to and padock? Were ever you decide just make it as safe as possible for her and the new arrival. Let us know how it goes!
 

Kris Moos
Nursing Foal
Username: Kris

Post Number: 17
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Saturday, January 14, 2006 - 09:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

thanks i will!
 

Kim Winter
Yearling
Username: Clafairy

Post Number: 89
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Sunday, January 15, 2006 - 05:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I also have a barn with attached paddock so that my mare can decide where she would like to be - She has not really settled into the barn since we moved there and I still have just over three months to go so I will try shifting the door to a better side so she can see the horses over the road and maybe then she will be happier - If so I will keep her in at night and she will foal in (hopefully) but as the situation stands I will let her in the small paddock and she can choose - I have lights on a generator that will make the paddock BRIGHT,It is likely that I will be sleeping in the hay storage that is built into the barn when the time comes so I should be able to keep a close eye on either scenario
 

E Watkins
Yearling
Username: Evie

Post Number: 74
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 01:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kris- Did you decide to leave the mare outside and give up on stalling her after all? Just wondered what you'd decided on?
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 153
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 02:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

E.- I have decided to leave her outside-I have tried leaving her in for hours days at a time and no luck, everyday has gotten worse! I think because it has been so long she just cnat handle it! I have her area set up in the barn, but am setting upa nd preparing for outside lean to isolation. I am hoping as she gets close that she will not be bothered by being alone, i will try again when signs show were close...I just pray weather cooperates, regardless of where she has it, i also have a friends place lined up with actual stalls where she would be able to see others instead of at my house where she will be the only one inside. just in case we are subzero when she foals. Ihave heat lamps reserved and eady too, so hopefully we are good...i know as it gets closer that i will have little to no sleep adn may need to camp outside if need be...but we will see...
 

E Watkins
Yearling
Username: Evie

Post Number: 80
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good luck Kris, I hope you have a nice warm spell when she decides to drop that baby. As anxious as she seems to be about being seperated from the herd, you've probably chosen the best option. I'm going to have to separate my mares after they have weaned their foals. Though they cannot "see" each other now, the wall is solid between them, they still seem to know when the other is out being ridden. They whinny, pace.. etc. They'll have to get over that because ONE of them is going to Wyoming this year and the other is staying home.
 

Roben Grenier
Neonate
Username: Roben

Post Number: 4
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Saturday, May 06, 2006 - 04:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My little barn has removable stall walls so one box stall becomes a really large area. It is also designed so the other mare(not an aggressive bone in her body-also pregnant) can come in and out and "visit"over the stall wall. This seemed to work well until the actual foaling. My "imminent" mare was turned out for a little exercise and sun. When checked at 10am, a brand new, wet baby was struggling to get out of the way of the other mare, who was trying to attack the baby! They were seperated and all is well, my preggie is back to her sweet self. I sure learned a valuable lesson, Thankfully with no repercussions!

Good Luck! Roben



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