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Different terms for the same thing.

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Different terms for the same thing. « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Lisa Weir
Weanling
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 50
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 05:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK, This is an awfully big world and we talk differently at each end. The things us Aussies say may not make sense to anyone else, and I know there are a few things I've read here that I'm not sure of. The same goes with different breeds. QH to thoroughbred, etc etc.
So, I though we should have a place to come and find out.

A couple of things I've noticed that are different, but easy to understand....
Bagging down...we call that Bagging Up.
Settled....pregnant or In foal.
Bred.....covered or served.
The list goes on.
The first question I have is this: What is the difference between a stud colt and any other colt?
Is it some kind of breed registraion issue?
 

Emma
Neonate
Username: Emma

Post Number: 7
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 09:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm glad you brought that up Lisa ... Ive been wondering the same thing about stud colts ... I always considered a stud colt a colt who had what it take to be kept for breeding in the future but i have notice a lot of people are calling all new born colts stud colts.
as far as the bagging UP thing goes .... maybe (just like the nail thing)its got something to do with what side of the equator we are on!
 

Scattered Oaks Morgans
Neonate
Username: Margie_s

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 11:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here in the SE US, I had always understood that a "stud colt" was a colt that hadn't been gelded. If they reach an age where they are used for breeding, we call them stallions. If they are gelded prior to reaching that age, then, of course, we refer to them as geldings.
"Fillies" are young girl horses. When they reach breeding age, we then call them "mares". They almost always "Bag Up" here. Maybe it's because we feel we are a little down under, since everyone refers to us as "down south".;-)
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.196.104.245
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 12:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa, I'm in Canada and we use all those terms. I've never even heard of "bagged down". I know there are some though, ie. we trailer horses we don't float them!
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10322
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, September 27, 2005 - 10:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We of course travel throughout North America, and therefore come into contact with a lot of coloquialisms. Additionally, I am English and therefore have a WIDE collection of various terms! :-)

Bagging down...we call that Bagging Up.

This is one that I can't really explain unless it's because of the hemisphere (remember my post on the water in the plug hole :-)). I have always heard it to be "bagging up" though.

Settled....pregnant or In foal.

This in my experience has been fairly universal terminology.

Bred.....covered or served.

This is actually one of my pet peeves :-) The term "bred" is often [incorrectly] used to indicate that she is pregnant. In fact though, to be accurate it means that she has been.... well, bred. Therefore there is the possibility she is pregnant, but not a guarantee!!

What is the difference between a stud colt and any other colt?

Again, another pet peeve! :-) In my experience, the term "colt" is often used interchangeably with the word "foal". As there is a chance that the foal may be female, it is therefore necessary to differentiate from it being a male, hence the use of "stud colt". <choke><splutter> We use only "foal", and then differentiate between those with the use of the term "colt" or "filly". Of course, that can result in the question of when a "colt" becomes a "stallion", and a "filly" a "mare" :-). This lack of correct usage of terminology is in our experience furthered by some horse shows in NA that have classes for "stallions" that include yearlings and two year-olds...!!!

Another pet peeve of mine (there's lots of 'em :-)) is the use of the term "stud" to denote "stallion". I'm sure that our Oz friends will concur on this one as the term "stud" in the UK and the southern hemisphere is used to describe or name a facility that stands stallions rather than the stallion himself...! Examples of this include the National Stud (Newmarket, England), the Irish National Stud, the VDL Stud (Netherlands), the Lyndhurst Stud (Australia) and Cambridge Stud in New Zealand.

There - clear as mud! Don't'cha just love horse people language
 

Cathy
Weanling
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 47
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 12:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OH!!! Lets not even get into people that advertise horse as OWN instead of DIRECT sons or daughters of "such and such" That is a BIG pet peeve of mine!!! If you don't know the difference, don't use the term!!!

P.S. WHO doesn't know the diference between a colt, filly,and foal? that is so basic that if you can't answer, don't breed! You need to educate yourself at least a little before you do.
 

Emma
Neonate
Username: Emma

Post Number: 9
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 01:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i dont think Lisa did not understand what a foal, colt or filly was, like myself. What we were asking is why in America new born colt foals are called 'STUD' colts. In australia a colt that is called a 'STUD' colt usually is at least a few months old and is a colt who is worth considering keeping entire for the moment as he may be showing a lot of promise as a future stallion as far as type and confimation goes.
I will back you up all the way Jos, a stud here in Australia is somewhere where horses are bred on and generally stands at least one stallion.

Another one i have noticed is in Australia we have Lucern Hay, but I'm pretty sure in Europe and America it is called Alphalpha.
I also know that it is unheard of in Ireland to feed your horses dry 'Hay' my husband has rally's in Ireland and they had no idea what he was talking about when he mention that it was time to cut and bale the grass hay! They can't even believ that horses eat it!
 

Lisa Weir
Yearling
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 51
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 06:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You're right Emma, I can tell the difference between a filly and a colt.

The funny thing about racing here....a filly becomes a mare at 4....but a colt becomes a horse! That's just dumb, but....oh well.

Floating horses...I wonder where that came from...but, yeah, that's how we get them around!

I have often wondered if lucerne and alfalfa are the same plant.

And pet peeves.....I'm so glad I'm not the only one who gets uptight over stuff like that.
You should hear some of the daft theories people have come to me with over the years.

*edits* Just to say that settled usually means relaxed and happy.

(Message edited by pals_pal on September 28, 2005)
 

Kim v.
Yearling
Username: Twhgait

Post Number: 84
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 08:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK, I'll bite......what IS the difference between a "direct" son and an "own" son? My breed uses "direct" son and that means the stallion is the son of so and so. I agree wholeheartedly with the "stud colt" description of foals!

We use "bagging up" and "making a bag" for bag development
 

Cathy
Weanling
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 49
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 11:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emma and Lisa I am sorry if It sounded like I was refereing to Lisa. I wasn't I really am sorry if you took it that way. I was refereing to people in general that know nothing about horses, and decide to breed. I am dealing with a couple like that now, and it frustrates me. I came across alittle strong. I'm sorry.

Kim If I breed my mare to my stallion and raise the foal (lets say a colt)He is an own son of my stallion. When an outside mare comes in to be bred, and has a colt it is a direct son. The term is used to describe if the offspring is born and raised on the farm where the stallion is owned. It can make a big difference in price. Horses for example coming off the King ranch or the 6666 Ranch can bring more money than outside offspring.
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 72.56.36.121
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 12:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That's interesting Cathy, never knew that.
As far as floating goes, we do "float" heavy machinery, just not horses. When their teeth are done that's referred to as floating.
 

Kim v.
Yearling
Username: Twhgait

Post Number: 85
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ahh haa, thank you Cathy for clarifying! I KNEW I had seen that phrase used but never in the TWH studs I've checked into
 

Emma
Nursing Foal
Username: Emma

Post Number: 11
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 28, 2005 - 08:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Wow Cathy, I had wondered about that phrase. Thats very interesting we dont see that alot here in australia.
I have a question for all you guys on the ooposite side of the equater to us here in Australia. Over the last few years now our seasons seem to be moving 3- 4 weeks further along. By this i mean summer weather used to start here in early November but of late we are lucky if it's warm by the end of November and even the start of December. And it is the same with summer creeping in on Autum/fall and so on so on. I was wondering wether it is the same type weather patterns over there. The reason behind this question is our foals are now being born in the cold even if they are September/ October foals which used to be a purfect time for them to be born. And our mares cycles are seeming to start later and later also because of the change in the weather patterns. Some more imput would be great!
 

Lisa Weir
Yearling
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 52
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Thursday, September 29, 2005 - 08:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy, I didn't think you were being mean....and I know where you're coming from with people who haven't a clue. It drives me nuts. Feel free to vent with people who know how you feel! LOL.

As for the seasons, Emma, I was just discussing that the other day. We have a heap of mares on regumate to stop them 'spring heating'. The first year we've ever had that problem in September. I'd love to know if it's world wide problem.

And with the relationships issue. I know some breeders here call two offspring from the same sire, but different dams half relations. But in thoroughbred terms they are not related. Is this the same everywhere?
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 72.56.36.121
Posted on Friday, September 30, 2005 - 10:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Generally around here (Ontario, Canada) people refer to offspring from the same dam as half-siblings. Technically same sire but different dam are half-siblings too, but for whatever reason we're not supposed to say they are.
As far as the seasons go, it seems to vary year to year really. This year we had 4 distinct seasons, but winter was not as harsh as the last couple of years until March, and then we got a real cold snap and some nasty weather, when usually in March we would be seeing an improvement in the weather.



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