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Imprint training

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Imprint training « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Kate Goshorn
Weanling
Username: Kateg

Post Number: 38
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2011 - 10:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Anyone do it? Pro and cons? My farrier suggested I do it, but I am concerned about trying it with a maiden mare. I have read Dr. Miller's book on it, but I don't see that denying the foal from standing and nursing right away as a good thing. Any thoughts??
 

Brittany Hindes
Breeding Stock
Username: Bhindes

Post Number: 222
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2011 - 12:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am still new to this whole thing but I start imprinting as soon as the foal comes out. Usually when I use clean towels to help dry the foal I will start imprinting but as soon as the foal tries to stand I get out of the way and let nature be. When the foal lays back down after its had its first drink then I think that would be another appropriate time to do some more inprinting. Some one else on here may have a better way to do imprinting if so please let us know.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 3155
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2011 - 07:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If someone is going to use imprinting techniques, we recommend that they follow the University of Arkansas recommendation that the imprinting be commenced after the foal has had one good belly-full nursing (not just a couple of slurps!). This in our opinion makes the most sense, and will reduce or prevent the chance of rejection by the dam - which is of particular importance if the people performing the technique are not familiar with post-foaling situations.
 

Kate Goshorn
Weanling
Username: Kateg

Post Number: 39
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Wednesday, March 09, 2011 - 10:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Jos! After consulting with a few trusted trainers in the area I am convinced that imprint training is not something I wish to attempt. I plan to handle the heck out of this foal and therefore don't see that there would be any benefit in my delaying the bonding between mom and baby. I will leave imprinting to nature.
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 2779
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 10, 2011 - 11:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I too read Dr. Miller's book....I basically was there for the birth and went with what seemed natural. My mare was very calm, stayed down for a good 15 minutes after giving birth so I just sat right there with them letting her lick and nicker the baby....then once up and after a good nursing just spent time. Touching all the places they recommend, tapping hooves. But I repeated it daily for the first 10 days. I think my greatest mistake with my first foal was being always worried about startling it, I was so quiet and gentle around it for months that I did it no favors because it super sensitive to change. My next foal I just went about the business of things without toning anything down and that filly is so much more calm! It is an exciting time! Enjoy it.
 

Kim Rose
Weanling
Username: Kleonaptra

Post Number: 33
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Friday, March 11, 2011 - 04:50 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dont agree with imprinting, just my personal opinion. We are there for the birth, so they get our scent (which is likely all over the mare, pasture and stall anyway!) and hear human voices. Since most births Ive attended happened in the wee morning hours, we checked all was ok and left them alone. Check again at breakfast time, but I dont actually attempt any handling until later that afternoon unless they really need it. I give the mare a feed and groom and bub is all over me before I can finish, so the foal gets rubbed all over and cooed over every afternoon from that point on!

I like what Jan says about not holding back. The ones I just went in and confidently started with new things were so much better adjusted than the ones I tiptoed around!
 

Tina
Yearling
Username: Hotti

Post Number: 91
Registered: 10-2009
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011 - 07:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I read somewhere on the internet that they did a university study on this...umm...they took say 50 foals and did imprint and say 50 that they did not imprint and the results where amazing and extremly interesting.....I DO NOT DO IT ANYMORE.
I must try to find it again..it was awsome reading.
 

Tina
Yearling
Username: Hotti

Post Number: 92
Registered: 10-2009
Posted on Monday, March 14, 2011 - 07:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

http://www.thehorse.com/viewarticle.aspx?ID=11259&source=rss

Hope im allowed to do that..if not i apologise Jos!
 

hedgerow pony farm
Breeding Stock
Username: Lotsofponies

Post Number: 159
Registered: 03-2009
Posted on Tuesday, March 15, 2011 - 10:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Tina for posting the article.
 

John Tyree
Neonate
Username: Jettex

Post Number: 8
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 26, 2011 - 08:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think imprinting is good. We have had several foals that are full brother or sister, and have done more imprinting on one than the other. The imprinted foals where calmer. I will say that it does take the trainer more time to get them to move off because they are so calm. Guess it is personal choice.
 

Cheryl Johnson
Neonate
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 4
Registered: 11-2010
Posted on Monday, April 04, 2011 - 09:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I take the middle road. I dry the foal off some, rubbing it gently and letting the mare lick it. When it tries to stand, I do step back and give them time to bond; let the baby nurse and all that. Then I go in and dip the cord, rub the baby all over again, clean mama up, pet her and of course give her a good feeding of oats.

I do go about it business as usual, for the most part, but avoid moving quickly toward the foal. I hold still if it sniffs at me. I halter it day one, making sure there is nothing it can hang up on. I also work with slipping the halter on and off, getting the foal to walk with me in the pen (I don't attempt this in a big open space at first).

I don't think that is really imprinting. I think it is just getting the foal used to human contact and teaching it not to fear us.

When the foals were turned out for the winter, I occasionally haltered them. they never forgot their early lessons. I even "cleaned," the colts sheath at a very early age. He never objected. I also handled my filly's udder. She loved to be scratched there.
 

Tracy Larson
Neonate
Username: Tlcmsrn

Post Number: 6
Registered: 04-2011
Posted on Sunday, May 29, 2011 - 12:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I imprinted 2 of my foals this year in an attempt to make them friendlier. Well a month later I still can't just walk up to them and pet them, and the mothers are more protective. One very reliable mare won't even go near the stallion. I am not going to imprint the third and see what happens.



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