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Club foot/hoof

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Club foot/hoof « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Diane Loveday
Breeding Stock
Username: Dianeluv

Post Number: 192
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Saturday, October 31, 2009 - 09:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Has anyone had a foal with a "club foot", or know where I can get some information on this. My vet has said my filly's front right is "sorta clubby" The shape is different then the others, more block like with very little toe and higher heel. My farrier has me filing her heel a little every week or so but i"d like more info. Thanks
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1007
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm sorry Diane. That is a tough one, from what I've heard. I only know of a severe case, where the foal had to be put down.

How old is this baby? What does the vet say about the long term? I hope the farrier can make this work out. Maybe with mini's it is not the concern it would be, with a larger and heavier horse?

I presume this is your first club foot? It is hereditary (club foot) but I imagine you already know that.

Sorry I can't offer any help.
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1008
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 06:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Opp! Diane, I don't know if you raise mini's or not. Got you mixed up with someone else.

I would find out if the mare or stallion have had other babies that have had club feet and find out what the long term prognosis is. Let us know how it turns out, okay?
 

Terry Waechter P.R.E. foals
Breeding Stock
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 885
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 10:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had a bit of experience with club feet on babies....in the case of both foals (two different mothers) it was inherited....in both cases, correction was possible with time and dilligence....

Having said that, as a breeder, I would not buy or breed a mare with club feet in her family or to such a stallion...it just adds another negative possibility to the situation...a club footed horse is more difficult to sell and potentially to train....

If you already have the baby and love it, do the corrections, absorb the extra cost and go from there with your plan but I would not breed the mare again if that is where it came from...

Good luck
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1011
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, November 06, 2009 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I absolutely agree with Terry. That was what I was alluding to when I said to find out if there were other club foot babies by the stallion or the mare. Hopefully, you can find out what line the club foot came from. Wishing you the best.
 

Diane Loveday
Breeding Stock
Username: Dianeluv

Post Number: 193
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well my research has shown me that this not really a case of "club" foot or contracted tendon. It seems that her hoof is simply shaped in a more block like fashion. She is 7 m old and runs and jumps with the best of them. We are working on filling her heel down a little each week. I think she'll be fine
http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk90/grandsons3/IMG_1372.jpg
http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk90/grandsons3/IMG_1373.jpg
http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk90/grandsons3/IMG_1376.jpg
http://i278.photobucket.com/albums/kk90/grandsons3/IMG_1381_edited.jpg
 

Jan H
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 1042
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would have to say by those photos, that this filly has a classic case of club foot, but to be sure have a vet look at her. I have seen a number of cases 4 of my own before I knew it was a TB mare who was throwing it. I was in denial for a awhile thinking it was the stallion I used for 3 of the foals but I bred to another stallion and she had another foal with the same defect. The mare did not show the defect. All of my foals had a mild form, and corrective trimming kept all of them sound. That mare is no longer bred. this was years ago, but a club foot is a club foot, there are 3 levels of severity grade 1 to 3 all of mine were grade 1, but I have a friend who has 3 horses with club feet 2 have grade 2 and 1 has grade 3 the grade 3 horse is completely lame but a sweet pasture pet. Please have your foal checked by a vet, he/she would be the only person who can tell you for sure if your filly is club footed and what grade she is...if she is.
 

Ad TB
Breeding Stock
Username: Ajvtbs

Post Number: 918
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Tuesday, November 10, 2009 - 05:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diana, It does look like a club foot, here's a link that you might find helpful http://www.nanric.com/Howtotreatclubfeet.asp
 

Kim Peavy
Breeding Stock
Username: Lovemysinbad

Post Number: 554
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Wednesday, November 11, 2009 - 10:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diana, that foot looks exactly like my mares 2006 club footed filly...she too developed it like overnight at 6 mos of age...I attributed it to this...too much feed, rich mama's milk and not enough turnout...I just didn't know any better and the boarding barn kept her in stall with mama the first 6 mos of her life. We easily fixed it at Pete/Smith equine hospital. Took her in right away and had cut her check ligament...if that is the proper spelling...but it worked like a charm and she's a very nice riding horse with no feet problems today.....you should have your vet look into it right away before she gets much older. Kim
 

Diane Loveday
Breeding Stock
Username: Dianeluv

Post Number: 194
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Thursday, November 12, 2009 - 05:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK thanks for all the input. I have had my vet check her out. She recommends frequent filing of her heal at this time. I am working on this. I am also working with my farrier to have him trim her every couple of weeks.
She is turned out 12 hrs a day and has been since she was foaled. She gets 1 lb of TC Growth 2X/day and plenty of good Timmothy hay.
Ad thanks for the link, time for more research...
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1017
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, November 19, 2009 - 12:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diane, I hope it is not a club foot, but sure looks like it to me. A "block foot," is a club foot, in horses.

Also, it will occur at birth (even if no one picks up on it right away) if it is a true club foot.

I know of a horse that threw an occassional mild club footed foal, but one time it did produce a severe case and that foal had to be put down. So there is no knowing how bad the foals will come out.

I certainly wish you well and hope it is something correctable, at least enough to be able to ride your horse. It all depends on what you want to use the horse for. I'm sorry you have to deal with this issue though. Good Luck for a good outcome.
 

Sora
Weanling
Username: Sora

Post Number: 27
Registered: 04-2008
Posted on Friday, January 01, 2010 - 01:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi there. I am no expert on this, but thought I'd give some input. Babies do naturally tend to go through a phase of being clubfooted. Your baby clearly has one more upright foot. Was her foot like this all along? That would be more a genetic factor.

You can clearly see from the pictures that the growth rings on the back of that foot are much larger on that right foot than the left. What is causing that is the key. If she has some kind of tendon tightness, that can put less pressure on that heel and thus it grows more. The first baby I bred was born with tight tendons. She was wrapped for a few weeks and given a mild muscle relaxer to loosen up those tendons until she put normal weight on her full foot. If that hadn't been done, I'd imagine her feet would be clubby.

The first 6-9 months are super important in trimming a baby's feet because the bones are growing and hardening, so you want to really make sure they stay even. Hopefully with slowly trimming that heel and keeping her even, you can get rid of the foot and she'll be normal. You want to at least minimize it as much as possible, as the more uneven she is, the more it effects everything else. You can look up barefoot trimming of foals on the internet and find tons of good information.

The mare I have technically has a bit of a club foot. She is a world class bred dressage horse that is growing baby 5 at 11, and I got her and started riding her at 8. In 3 years she's had 1 baby, is growing another, gone from green broke to fourth level, is perfectly sound, and barefoot (competing in dressage.) I keep on eye on her feet and trim regularly to even it out as much as possible. So, what could be termed as a mild club foot should not interfere with anything you want to do.
 

Lisa Miller
Neonate
Username: Zharshai

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2010
Posted on Friday, January 22, 2010 - 11:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi,

I have had a few friends use a dynamic splint (can't remember the name) to correct issues like this. They all said it worked really well. I am pretty sure one was a mild club foot, very similar to the photographs and trimming wasn't enough to correct the problem. If the issue isn't getting any better you might want to consider something like this. The older the horse gets the tougher it will be to correct the issue.
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1027
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, February 06, 2010 - 08:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diane, did you get a definitive answer? I'm just wondering, because it would be interesting to know if I was wrong, and it isn't a club foot. I still have an awful lot to learn. I hope I was wrong and it is a correctable condition.



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