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Yearling question

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Yearling question « Previous Next »


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Emily S
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgrl88

Post Number: 243
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, September 08, 2009 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey guys, I was just wondering what the best way is to train my yearling on getting out of my personal space? Sometimes he leads well, but then other times he's really pushy and walks on me. If anyone has any tips, that would be great! Thank you!
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 976
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, September 10, 2009 - 08:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily, I had the same problem with my little guy. Pushing is not always effective because it can turn into a match to see who is stronger, and we know the answer to that one! LOL!

You can try tapping him with a rope or crop when he does it. That can give you an element of surprise, but of course do it right away-within a few seconds-or it is pointless.

Also, you can poke him in the face with a finger, if he tries to nibble at you. You just keep on doing whatever else you were doing, such as leading, as though nothing had happened. It can take a lot of tries to stop it, so don't give up. I saw this on a training video once and have used it since.

Of course, to them, they are just being a horse, as I'm sure you know, but I'm like you; I don't want them in my personal space and the earlier they learn this, the better. Hope it helps. Aren't they fun?
 

Emily S
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgrl88

Post Number: 245
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, September 12, 2009 - 01:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lol, they are a lot of fun :-). When I tap him with a crop or rope, should I just do it on the front of his chest if he's trying to push in front of me?
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 2632
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, September 12, 2009 - 09:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Either that, or just keep your elbow in his neck when leading him....and when he starts to walk over you, give a sharp jab with it. Doesn't take long for them to realize keeping away from that is priority.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 980
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009 - 12:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, and if you can make them think they are running into it themselves, even better!

I've tried using my elbow, but eventually it hurt too much-me, not him! LOL

The trick is to correct, stopping the behavior, without making them afraid to approach you. My guy tended to stay away from me for awhile, but he eventually came around.

He was so funny, because he would come on strong, see that I was about to raise my hand with the crop, and take off with a kick into the air! Good luck with your colt.
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 426
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009 - 09:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily, my guy, Nova, born Feb, 2008 was pushing real bad when I was feeding everyone and him. I used my elbow and sharply said back as I fed the others, and when I got to his bucket, I would not put the feed in until he backed about 5-6 steps and chewed with his mouth, then he had to stay before I released him with "good boy" and poured his food. We did this EVERY meal for a very long time and now he backs up , chews and waits without any command. If he ever slips up we immediately command him. I still am having trouble however when I have cubes or hay to scatter in the pasture, he is all over me and I haven't solved that yet. It actually can get dangerous. The leading is going fairly well , he will balk sometimes but eventually will go forward. Doesn't push much with the walk, been using my elbow as if He runs into it and I say a real gutteral " aaaa" . He does get pushy when I'm trying to make him TROT with me. I think he gets excited.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 984
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, September 13, 2009 - 10:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Gosh Kay, I remember when Nova was born! How time truly does fly!

Glad he is doing well overall on his behavior. I used to use the guteral aaahh sound on my Poco, too. It got so his dam would immediately call to him and trot off with him when she heard it. I felt kind of bad-she thought I was hurting her baby!

But of course, Nova is weaned now. What are your plans for him?
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 427
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Monday, September 14, 2009 - 03:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi CJ----I plan to get him to a trainer around
2 1/2 years. I just want a bomb proof trail riding horse. I've been working on leaving the others, hand walking in the woods, rubbing all over him with objects and me, minding. I've also been asking around for trainers---who they trained with, philosophies, methods, price, time to train, distance, etc. I have been riding his mom and working on getting my trailer ready to spend the night. I bought a spring tie to tie Topi at night ( any body heard about these), a porti poddi, and about to renovate the inside dressing room. I'd love to pony Nova off Topi but I'm not that good of a rider. It takes all my concentration and nerves to ride her. She's good but I'm just not confident in any of MY riding. We're working at it and getting more an more brave and sure of myself. I'm really nervous about riding Nova- a 2 year old, so have to really get time in the saddle. Also, what kind is the best breast collar for trail riding--contour, U- shaped, or what, I do want about 2 inches wide. Nova is about 860 pounds and butt is higher than his mom. I'll try to get pictures later.
 

judy cervantes
Breeding Stock
Username: Coloredpony

Post Number: 118
Registered: 12-2008
Posted on Tuesday, September 15, 2009 - 02:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Kay,can you believe we are just a short time from rideing are babys?Good for you to be getting ready to go camping with topi,i also think around 2 1/2 3 i will take chenoa to a trainer and have him started,send pics of nova when you can i would love to see him.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 990
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2009 - 03:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kay, I know what you mean about having the confidence to ride a very young horse. It can be unnerving. Depends a lot on the horse, but they sure know if we feel uncertain. Our feelings "travel" from us to the horse. Amazing how they pick up on that. Maybe having him in training for a bit, then you riding him with the trainer there will alleviate your fears?

I was fearless when I was young, but not any more. I too want a nice, quiet horse for trail riding. I don't want him dead though! LOL!

I want to raise a baby out of my mare, but am rethinking it. I mean feeding for two-three years; paying for training and so on-I don't know. I'm not getting any younger, so might just sell my babies and buy a nice, already well seasoned gelding to ride!

But oh, the temptation to keep a baby to raise up myself. It's such a challenge.

Well, I've gone on long enough. I hope your guy turns into the perfect trail horse for you, so you can just enjoy the ride. That's what its all about, eh?
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 428
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, September 17, 2009 - 09:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, CJ, I've often thought with my riding experience , Nova will probably never get to his potential. He needs ranch work but I can't stand to think of not seeing him. He will probably be my only baby. Its so much worry and work. His mom is working into a nice trail horse--14 years old and calm, not much seems to spook her and she's fairly easy going, sometimes has her own opinion. Nova is working out nicely as to ground manners but riding may be another matter. Thanks for the your hopes.
 

Emily S
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgrl88

Post Number: 246
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, September 19, 2009 - 02:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sometimes Atticus will also kind of knock me with his head, like if I'm standing beside him and he looks around. Is this normal, and what can I do about it? I mean, he's gotten me pretty good on the jaw a couple of times.
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 429
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Sunday, September 20, 2009 - 11:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Nova has done that to me too. As soon as I brag a little about how good he is getting on ground manners and respect, he takes two steps back. He stepped on my foot( thank goodness I had boots on) twice on Saturday. They need to be trained to not get in your space. Its hard to teach especially if you are like me and love for him to act like he wants to be near you and love you. But I do know this is best. Not so close unless I ask you in. How to teach it --I'd like some more pointers too.
Saturday my older mare while feeling her teeth to see if they needed floating, bit the tip of my finger. Boy it still hurts and the nail is turning black. Then Nova steps on my foot and then he stepped over his lead rope when I had him tied to a post. It wasn't that long either. Thank goodness he's calm, I saw him trying to take care of it with his leg up in the air about chest heigth. I calmly undid the rope and lowered his leg. Could have been a disaster. After Saturdays mishaps I was really wondering if I was cut out for horses.
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 2648
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009 - 12:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

very important to keep those heads tied on short leads at head level!! Those situations can turn disasterous before you know it, especially with young horses. I'm so glad it turned out ok. They mustn't be able to get their heads to the ground while tied!
Hope your finger turns out ok, i know that hurts!! and the poor foot too......what a day that must've been!
 

Terry Waechter P.R.E. foals
Breeding Stock
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 878
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009 - 01:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

An action I take to move a horse away from me is to shake or twirl the rope and step towards them....usually they move away and we continue to stand or walk....it works well as a non-aggressive reminder to honor my space////
 

Marilyn Lemke
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 2249
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Monday, September 21, 2009 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kay, I know how you feel. I was working Asia and I am a total klutz! I can't seem to get my coordination and timely right. I hope I don't screw her up! But like you said, sometimes I wonder if I'm cut out for horses as well...
 

Terry Waechter P.R.E. foals
Breeding Stock
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 879
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009 - 12:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

re read your post so sorry about the battle wounds...know the feeling OUCH
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 995
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009 - 02:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've seen Dennis Reed on T.V. (RFD). He has a saying: "I can touch you, but you can't touch me." One of the things he does to establish space is to stand several feet away, with the halter and lead on. He begins to jiggle the rope and in the beginning, usually gets no response. So he jiggles it more and raises his arms up, as he approaches the horse. He also kind of shuffles. Hard to explain, but it causes the horse to back up.

If the horse gets too close, you can do a few things. One is to poke at the face. You don't look at him, just give him a poke whenever the face is too close. I usually do it near the muzzle.

You can use a rope, as Terry suggested.

I also spend some time stopping "big" when I am leading, to teach them to stop immediately when I stop. You have to exaggerate the motion at first, but soon they get it.

Respect is what it's all about and it is hard to find the balance of wanting to love them up and getting that respect (distance).

Also, it helps to remember that young (and sometimes not so young) horses want to crowd us if they get unsure of something. They do that with their mamas. Really dangerous, of course.

My mare has done that to me, and also pushes her head over top of mine. I'm having more trouble with her than I had with the baby, to some degree! I just need to get her respect and am working on that.

One of the biggest things to remember is to not get emotional about it. Harder said than done, but very important to do any correction with an, "business as usual," attitude. It has to be within 3 seconds of their action. Take any pressure off as soon as they comply.

Hope this helps.
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 430
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009 - 08:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, loved reading all your posts. We'll keep working on it. Overall , I'm very pleased with my big boy. It has been a wonderful but trying experience. I know what he's doing all comes from me- good and bad. He just learns what I teach him or dont teach him. Did I tell you I got a round pen and he is getting the idea to trot in the circle and change direction. I heard that helps with respect. I don't do alot of circles , heard it can hurt their legs this young.
 

Marilyn Lemke
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 2252
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009 - 08:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cj, thank you for the wonderful tips. I'm always anxious to try things that work for others.

I worked with Asia yesterday and felt much better about her and myself. I will keep working with her and I'm sure things will progress.

Thanks for everyone's help!
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 2608
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 22, 2009 - 10:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kay...nice to see you posting...always love reading how your boy is doing. The biggest thing is not to get discouraged. You may have a bad day, your horse may have a bad day. Try to be consistent. I still occasionally will carry a short riding crop. Use it as an arm extension. When leading have it turned out towards the horse so if they crowd in too close a quick poke, stop a light tap in the chest. When tied and they get really nosey about what i am doing just flick with your middle finger and thumb. Everything needs to be done immediately. Horses are excellent body language readers and we are the beginners. You can learn alot by watching your horses turned out with one another. Also my horses know "Quit" If they start pawing the ground I holler stern and mean "Quit" instantly head is up and eyes on me...same thing if they are chewing, rubbing ...
Just like when I get to their stalls with halter in hand they come to the door, drop in the head, and wait patiently to go. Since they were days old they always came to the door, got haltered waited until I was ready to lead them out. Over and over and over again....and I never vary. Even for simple task it is always the same. You guys are doing great.....



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