MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Hormone imbalance or feeding problem?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Hormone imbalance or feeding problem? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

phil mcgrowling
Yearling
Username: Liberty

Post Number: 54
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, July 16, 2008 - 05:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 12yr old mare that i have had since she was a foal. She use to be a really good horse and she still is except she has one problem that makes working with her difficult. Sometimes she is extremely hard to catch. So hard that one has to run her with a 4wheeler until she gets tired. I know that sounds extreme but we have tried everything and thats the only way u can catch her when she is like that. She is never worked, we are never mean to her, I know its not because she is scared of humans because when shes in a good mood shes comes right up and u can catch her easily. I dont think this has anything to do with her comming in heat either because her moods change to quick. I might catch her just fine in the morning, then that afternoon if i wanna pet, feed, or take her to a new field she wont let u catch her. The other day i went into the field and she just layed her ears back and turned away, like she hated my guts, then the very next day she was was waiting at the gate for me and let me catch her just fine. Also once you catch her she is just fine. she is turned out in a pasture with plenty of gras and thats all she get, i stopped feeding her cause it made her meaner, she tore the gate down in the barn. She also has little hard knots all down her neck and shoulder and she doesnt like u to touch them. And the bottom of her feet look like what i call hamburger meat, theyre all uneven, I'll fix it and then in no time theyre back to hamburger meat. So my question is this, Could this be a hormonal or vitamin deficiency? She is really fat and that little ball thing between her cheecks is also swollen. I have tried giving her mineral blocks but she just stands there and eats the whole thing like its grain, and she wont stop till its gone, and the directions on the package says that they shouldnt eat it all like that.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 570
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2008 - 03:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Phil: I'm not vet and don't pretend to even come close but I would say that you may have an endocrine issue or a starch/protein/insulin digestive process issue.

Echo, my mare has an insulin issue and she does alot of the behavior that you are talking about. She also has feet issues and weight issues. She can be really tempermental too, catch her one minute, can't touch her the next. She's a sweetheart to ride one day and the next, you may be finding yourself coming out of bucking shoot number 3.

That's one reason I LOVE to have her pregnant. I don't know why or what (and I'm sure that there are biological explanations that are quite reasonable) but when she's in foal, her insulin issue gets much better, feet issues are better, her personality stabilizes out and the obese weight control is easier.

If she's hoovering up a block...I would say that there is some type of imbalance or deficiency somewhere. If its some type of "uptake" issue, it isn't going to solve anything with what you're feeding her...its going to have be resolved first in order that what you're feeding her is being utilized.

(By the way, my mare was extremely food aggressive as well...now that she is more stable, she is better but it somewhere along her lifetime became a learned behavior in reaction)
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 571
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2008 - 03:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'll try to find you a link about these type of disorders. I just listened to a great program last Sunday on the radio called "The Better Horse Network" that is hosted by Purina and Veterinarians.
 

phil mcgrowling
Yearling
Username: Liberty

Post Number: 56
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Thursday, July 17, 2008 - 04:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

thanks!! I would really like a link to the disorders. I just know that something isnt right with her, and im about to run out of options on what to do with her, right now im trying to keep her by herself cause when she snaps shell go after the other horses with nothin but teeth showing, however its hard to do cause there are horses everywhere in my neighbor hood.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 575
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

phil: Here's the link to the nutrition site. I am linking you up to a specific nutrition program that I was listening to last Sunday. You may want to look around on this site for "hormonal and endocrine issues with feeding programs" as I know that was addressed as well.

I will get you the site to the actual disorders shortly.

Hope it helps!

http://betterhorsesnetwork.homestead.com/KatieYoung.html
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 576
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

phil: Here's another site that can be helpful!

http://www.horse.purinamills.com/conditions/insulin.asp

I'm no expert, but my ex-husband is. Hehehehe. He owned and operated a Purina Mills Feed Store for his entire life, as well as, his father owned and operated it before him. I use his expertise probably as much as I use my veterinarian's expertise. He is always right on so if you would like me to ask him any nutrition advice for you, I would be happy to do so.
 

phil mcgrowling
Yearling
Username: Liberty

Post Number: 57
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Friday, July 18, 2008 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

WOW!!! Thanks I have been trying to figure it out for years... I asked my vet a few yrs back and she was like "i dont know? guess she's just fat?" I'll check the links out for sure!
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 657
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, July 27, 2008 - 02:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay Bobbi, I'm skullking around here and saw your offer to Phil. Think your husband could help me out too?

Lactating mare is fat. Needs enough nutrition to feed baby. How much is enough? Does she need supplements, or is alfalfa and forage hay enough? Of course she has access to a mineral block 24/7.

If he has time, I'd love the answer, as it is a struggle.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 586
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, July 28, 2008 - 06:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cj: I'll get you your answer. Personally, I wouldn't give her much more than a 10% or 12% feed with perhaps a Strategy combo. There is a thing as too much protein. Especially for some of those mares that are fat or overweight. I would increase the forage hay and decrease down on the alfalfa. If she has salt and minerals, I wouldn't worry about that. They will usually intake what they need. I would make sure that she has a good vitamin supplement (Mare Care or something comparable...I give this same vitamin supplement to my foals when they start eating grain as well.)

I will have Larry to an analysis for you. What are you currently feeding and quantity now? That way he can get an idea on what is currently her program and what changes/adjustments you may need to make.

"We tend to over-protein our horses when in fact, unless they are under rigorous training/competition, they are probably not in need of it."

You know, its one thing to make sure we feed pregnant mares well as they are essentially eating for two. But once the foal is on the ground, mom should remain healthy enough on a "normal" feeding program for noncompeting horses to provide plenty of milk to baby.

Also, is your little one starting to eat/nibble at grain yet?
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 587
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, July 28, 2008 - 06:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, and I say that with a "typically"...I still feed Blossom (Moose's mommy) the same amounts of grain as I did when she was pregnant. She is a hard keeper and baby really pulls her down so I have to chum it up for her in order for her to maintain a good body weight.

Echo and Lena are already cut back to their normal feed ration as when they are not pregnant. But, they are my starch/sugar processing problem horses.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 617
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, July 30, 2008 - 12:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

phil: (Or anyone else who may interested) Here is a link to a free monthly newsletter that is sent email. I love this site and it always has some of the leading and cutting edge research on it. This month focus is on some of these insulin resistance issues, as well as, some very interesting things about potential new equine disease threats (a couple of them are already surfacing in the California areas...yikes)
http://www.thehorse.com/Default.aspx
 

Beth
Yearling
Username: Beth13

Post Number: 84
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Thursday, August 21, 2008 - 01:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a mare who is hard to catch as well. I usally can catch her if I have a treat for her with me, but if I don't I'm lucky to get within 10 metres of her!I have had her since she was two yrs old and did all her training, including halter breaking, she's seven now so we've been together a while. I'm not feeding her anything right now- our property is quite large and has plenty of feed in paddock. She's not overweight, she's really fine boned and petite. I think her behaviour is a game because whenever she runs away, she'll only go far enough to stay out of range, then she'll stop and watch me, waiting until I get close again. I have heard of methods that when you chase them then stop and ignore them, they'll walk up to you, I have tried that and she just ignores me! Anybody else have horses like her?
 

Carol
Neonate
Username: Foxtrot

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2008
Posted on Tuesday, February 17, 2009 - 02:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 17 old mare that has a Hormone imbalance.
She has alway had strong heat cycle and could be time to the day they would start. Only problem was at that time you couldn't ride her around other horses as she would show heavy signs of heat. My vet recommended spay her, which I did only to make matter worse. Now anytime I ride her around other horses, she show signs of heat, even though she's fixed.

I have tried regumate and now using progesterone shots to control the signs.

She seems very touchy in the flank area and tries to kick out went you try to mount her to ride.

She also is hard to kept the weight off and has the crested neck and fat deposit on the tail area. Her diet is grass hay and a hand full on oats. Open grazing is to a miniuim as she has also foundered once while in foal.

Could there be other items that could be causing her to act this way?



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US