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One month old foal

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » One month old foal « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

phil mcgrowling
Weanling
Username: Liberty

Post Number: 46
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My new foal is now almost one month old. She knows how to lead and pick up all her feet, however she is very pushy. I have the Clinton Anderson ground series and was wondering if she was old enough to learn some of the stuff in those. I know she's not old enough to be lungeing and all but what about backing up and disengaging the hindquarters, giving to the halter and maybe a little tying? I know alot of people say not to do much with them till their older but if she gets any bigger she's gonna be mowing me over.
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1749
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Phil, I introduce ponying off momma by now. I start in the arena and go slow but they pick it up really quick following along by mom's side and out to trail we go for some short spins to get to know the neighborhood. My yearling crossed water at 3 weeks of age :-) I also introduce tying. Never unattended!! I tie up mom and I tie up baby next to her and do some grooming and when because they all do pull back there is a light tap on the hip to have them pop forward. They pick it up really quick and if mom is there they are pretty happy. I begin to increase the amount of time and by 4 months she would tie like an old pro. The main thing is that they can not be successful in getting untied whether it be fighting or learning to untie knots! So again never leave unattended but you can start with small lessons and I LOVE ponying out because in the wild they would be cover lots of territory learning about their enviroment from mom and you are just recreating that in the real life situation of our horses.
 

Diana Gilger
Breeding Stock
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 567
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 05:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

phil, ground training is important from the very beginning in my mind. As soon as they have learned to lead, I begin tying. Anything you can teach her now vocally (as far as backing, and such) is only going to help you later when you're breaking her to ride. Just remember, you can blow a babys' mind by "over doing it"...go slowly with her, moderation is key!~
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 628
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, June 22, 2008 - 02:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So with training, I'm confused. I finally have books coming, but in the meantime, my guy wants to bite me sometimes, but now I'm thinking that some of the time, he is just doing what he and mama do, when they "scratch" each other's withers.

I'm not sure when to punish him now. How do I manage that? Also, he runs up to me when I walk away, I think he wants to rear up on me, like he does him mama. I turn around and he stops. I'm not sure how to handle that.

He is eating very small pieces of carrot, (chews it up and swallows it) but refuses any food I offer in a rubbe pan. Any ideas?
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 283
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 22, 2008 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi, CJ. sounds like a typical COLT--I'm no expert but Nova did the exact thing. I'm really correcting him on biting and he's getting better. Do it within the first three seconds, ignore him then come back to him as if nothing happened. I've swatted, elbowed , snorted, yelled quit, and now I'm really knocking him one and aggressively moving toward him. I thought it was loving and playing and grooming at first but after several bite bruises, I DON"T want him doing that. Mine also seems to push into me when I'm leading him. I've pushed him over, any tricks to that training. I don't know what to tell you about the eating. Mine took to the bucket for food fairly easily. At first it was very close to mom, then I gradually moved it away.
 

Tahra Sky 3/14
Breeding Stock
Username: Tahra

Post Number: 154
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Sunday, June 22, 2008 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

CJskip Everyone has a way to tain the foal. As long as you are not abousive or over doing it you will be ok. I worked with sky just like he was an older horse. I don't let him get away with anything and just keep asking for what I want. I have had very little resistance in him. Good rule that I have found is if you will do it to an older horse, do the same to your foal.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 630
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, June 23, 2008 - 02:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank-you both. That helps. I also use different techniques. I want to associate the punishment with a verbal. I do it very quickly when he tries anything. And thanks for answering my question about the "grooming" thing.

I was feeling insecure. I have smacked him on the shoulder with a wooden stake, and have poked him with it in the butt when he swings his rear toward me too close. Sometimes he just wants a scratch there, but I am not letting him do it.

His mama really doesn't like me correcting him. That's a bit of a problem. He is getting so big. I may send him to a trainer when he is weaned, just for good ground work. I sure would hate to create a "bad" horse.

I'm not abusive, but he knows I will react. He keeps trying anyway. Guess he's just normal. I'll be glad when the books arrive. I have almost zero experience with a foal.

By the way, how old is it when a foal is no longer a foal?

And to those of you know the history with my guy, he is almot 8 weeks old, so will soon be over the danger zone as far as immunity goes.

Kay, I wanted to add that in colt training I learned that the horses do that (lean into you when leading them) because that is what they do with mama. They used rope to get the horse to keep out of "our" space. I've also elbowed them and it worked.

Tahra, thanks for the encouragement. My mare knows I don't know what I'm doing. It makes her nervous at times. There is so much to learn.

Diana, you've made some good points too. I think I need to spend more time with him, but keep it short.

I am pleased that he allows me to touch him almost anywhere. Sometimes he runs off and gives a kick to the air, but he never has kicked at me. For that, I'm grateful.
 

Beth
Yearling
Username: Beth13

Post Number: 71
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Monday, June 23, 2008 - 11:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Phil, about the backing moving the hindquarters... a horse is never to young to learn that sort of stuff. When the filly pushes you, turn around and back her up. And use your voice. Tell her 'no' or whatever you use. The only time I'll smack a horse is when they bite. Smack her hard enough for it to hurt her but not hard enough to make her afraid. Its a fine line I know. After you have punished her step away and turn your back on her. If she somes softly that is without pushing or biting, praise her alot. If she comes back behaving badly, repeat the punishment and turn away again. I don't use food often as a reward, because that may encourage them to become more pushy. Since your filly is already pushy I would just stick with pats and verbal praise.

(Message edited by beth13 on June 23, 2008)
 

phil mcgrowling
Weanling
Username: Liberty

Post Number: 50
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, June 24, 2008 - 11:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Beth, im gonna keep workin with her, she seems to be gettin better about the pushing, and she hasnt tried to rear up on me or kick me in a while. ive been doing the clinton anderson ground series on her and ive been working with teaching her to tie as well.
 

Beth
Yearling
Username: Beth13

Post Number: 74
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Sunday, June 29, 2008 - 11:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It great to hear she's getting better phil. Patience and persistance are the keys to working with horses of any age. Clinton Anderson uses natural methods with his horses doesn't he? If he does, does he have a web site?
 

phil mcgrowling
Yearling
Username: Liberty

Post Number: 53
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Monday, June 30, 2008 - 11:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

www.downunderhorsemanship.com/

This is Clinton Anderson's website
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 636
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2008 - 02:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Paul, how do you correct a foal that is Not in a halter, who strikes out at you or rears, or whatever?

I often spend time with my little guy in the small corral, in the morning and evening, without a halter. And sometimes he runs up to me in the pasture; obviously without a halter on. I'm open to suggestions. Pushing just wasn't working anymore.
 

Beth
Yearling
Username: Beth13

Post Number: 77
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Thursday, July 03, 2008 - 09:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cjskip, when your foal is in the corral, try putting your hand on his nose and chest and back him up. It is good practise for him, as he will need to know how to do this when he is older. I would start doing this while he is being good, so he dosen't start to associate backing up with only negative behaviour. But also do this while he is being naughty, so he starts to learn to respect your space. When he runs up to you in the pasture,[do you call him?] try turning this into a good behaviour trait. If he tries to run you over back him up, but if he runs around you and slows and stops without being pushy, reward him for that. [I wish my horses ran up to me, it would make catching them so much easier lol] Also try using the advice I gave to Phil earlier.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 640
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, July 05, 2008 - 02:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good idea Beth. Thanks. I have been using some head control with my hands and asking him to back up. He will take one step and I start praising him before he runs off to Mama.

In the pasture he runs like he does to his mama, and I can see from his behavior with his mom, rearing up, that he wants to do it with me. But I like the idea of him coming to me. No, I don't call him, except for carrots and feeding time. Thanks for the advice.
 

Beth
Yearling
Username: Beth13

Post Number: 80
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 12:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Anytime. Is he your only foal? Its great that he wants to treat you like his mum- not the behavioural and physical aspects of that relationship, but the fact that he is comfortable and feels safe around you. It'll make breaking him that much easier when he's older. Do you intend to keep him and train him?
 

mariana cremonte
Breeding Stock
Username: Mariana_cremonte

Post Number: 208
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 07:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a question. My 8 months old colt leads and ties quite well -most of the time, anyway -, backups up and moves hind quarters but he will never come when I call him, he does not even look me if I call him out. How do I teach him that?. My mare cames to me when I call her (if she gets a reward once in while, otherwise...) but I have not been able to do it with him. Can anyone tell me how to teach him that?. I taught him to stay about a meter away from me as he is a big guy and I was getting scared, maybe I confused him?.
Thanks!!!
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 298
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Mine doesn't come when he's off the halter, but maybe with time and practice, this will lead to it. I have Nova haltered and a long lead rope is attached. I tell him to stay and I walk around him, working on ground tying. Then I walk as far away as the lead rope will allow and I bow and slap on my front thighs and say"Come here!". If he doesn't I give a SLIGHT tug on the rope and he walks straight to me. Then I love him to death. This way I've asked him to get in my space. Does your little one turn to face you? That's another prerequisite I would think. I'm a first time owner so my training is strictly what's working with me right now.
 

mariana cremonte
Breeding Stock
Username: Mariana_cremonte

Post Number: 209
Registered: 05-2007
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 07:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hi Kay, that is a great idea!. I will try it.
Yes, he does face me and he never reared on me, he has a natural -I think- sweet disposition and learns very quick. I am also a first time owner, so I am learning along with him. Thanks again, if is not raining as hard as it was today, I will try it tomorrow.
 

corina gabel
Breeding Stock
Username: Newyearsbaby05

Post Number: 170
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, July 07, 2008 - 09:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

im all for treat training... i know i know everyone sayes thats it now enuff incentive to get a horse to do somehting willingly. we run barrels and poles do you know that my horses will run faster and preform better if they watch you put a treat in your pocket. You have to be firm on YOU giving them the treat and not leting them sniff and pick at you to find it. but for us to shave a hole second off our time tells me that its enuff incentive to get a some horses to preform. We use hay cubes like what you feed as a food source. the adults love it and they really arent getting something they souldnt have, but this is treats to them-they dont get them any other time!

Every time i mess with ours they get a treat. i tought my stud to back and turn specific directions on voice comand with treats. Now he runs to me stops and backs then waits every time i come to the fence. If you want a great training books i love john lyon. He takes the art to a hole new level and puts it into words that nonhorse people can understand.

GOOD LUCK you wont get it a day but they learn quick as long as you have something (love or a treat) they want.

Kay when you teach them to turn to and from on the fronts and backs are you give cues like touching the sides? this helps so much when you go to ride them also tell them turn right and turn left. I have mine to where he will turn for me with out rein or leg pressure i tell him easy right easy left - (I allso use easy for slowing down-run to trot-keeps him on his haunches for the turn)for work on hind legs and turn right and turn left for work on fronts. The more you talk them threw things the better you concentraed and the more they focus on you and what you are doing

our little one use to run to us and not stop... i broke ihm of that one day he came running and instead of moving out of the way i went at him with my arms out and yelled AAAAAHHHHHHHH....beautiful sliding stop and roll back. he now comes running but trots them down to a walk when near. He was playing he did it to his mom and she never corrected him for anything. I thought well this is it lets see if he likes it!!!

GOOD LUCK GUYS

(Message edited by newyearsbaby05 on July 07, 2008)



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