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Abandoned Horses and Free Horses

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Abandoned Horses and Free Horses « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 510
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 02:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I live in CA.'s Central Valley. Lately, horses have been dropped off on the side of the road and at animal shelters. Not surrendered, just dumped.

And yesterday I learned there is a mare and foal up for grabs. I'm going to look into it, but I just wonder if the rest of you are hearing about this happening in your area of the nation? This is the first time I've heard of this happening on a regular basis.
 

Phyllis Schroder
Yearling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 83
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 04:08 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cj,
It's been happening around the Houston, Tx area for sometime now unfortunately. (You may have even seen some on animal planet) And I'm sure it's occurring throughout the U.S. and will probably get much worse before it gets better.
This is in big part one of the products of ending horse slaughter.
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 318
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 09:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

CJ,
We have a weekly trader-type paper comes out on Wednesday here in the Upstate of SC. I have seen ads (not a whole lot but a couple) for "free" horses.
We just had about 15 horses seized in a county to the south of us this week. What was really irritating about this situation was that the woman they seized these horses from had "rescued" them from someone else. Yet these horses she had "rescued" were standing out in dirt paddocks with no hay, no water and full of worms.

What gets me is that I see this more often than I would like to. People go and "rescue" horses because I guess they figure that the horses are better off starving in their yard than someone elses? Go figure.
 

wanda
Breeding Stock
Username: Wanda

Post Number: 105
Registered: 04-2008
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 10:51 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have heard of this too...I heard that in Kentucky there is an auction site that it was getting so bad for people with the hay prices and drought(this was before winter) that people were bringing their horses and loading them in other peoples trailers when they weren't around and leaving them...or putting them in the round pens to be auctioned and leaving whether or not the got sold or not... poor horses.... I might not be completely horse smart but I do know how to feed them (probably too well)lol and if I can't then I would be smart enough to find them a home the 1st time I couldn't buy their feed or hay... it really makes me angry!!! Both of my horses came to me 3-400lbs underweight because of people like this (one from a rescue)that was pregnant and they said she wasn't!
 

Samantha
Breeding Stock
Username: Dressage_diva333

Post Number: 158
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, May 16, 2008 - 11:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Actually I have gotten two great mares for free recently. I also live in California, but Northern, CA. About 45 minutes out of Sacramento.

One of the mares was at a TB breeding farm, and her foals werent winning. She has an injury, and needs a special shoe every 6 weeks. The people I got her from were very nice, and really wanted a great home. Apparently they had been trying to give her away for a year. Anyways, now I have her, and she has a home here for good. I mean, who (besides me of course, cause she is just gorgeous and as sweet as they come) would take a lame, unbroke (or EXTREMLY green) mare? Not to mention she is 17.2, and eats 3 times as much as the other horses.

The other mare is a beautiful, VERY well bred Oldenburg mare. Both parents were imported from Germany. She was injured during weaning, and did not stay sound in training. Her breeder is the one I got her from, and she said she couldnt afford to breed anymore, and this mare deserved more than to sit out in the pasture. So I took the 6 hour trip to get her. She is even broke to ride (just won't stay sound for regular riding, but great on the trail).

The thought of something happening to either of those horses is just heartbreaking. If for any reason I had to get rid of them, you bet I would send them where a lot of my falmily lives, in Arkansas. They have huge pastures, and hardly have to feed the horses.



It's really too bad.

(Message edited by dressage_diva333 on May 16, 2008)
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 518
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 17, 2008 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The state of things with horses is apparently happening nationwide. I think people sometimes have no idea what they are getting into when they get horses, especially now, when so many are so cheap. It's sad. Many will probably end up being in bad situations over and over. Ugh!!!!! I don't want to think about it!
Yet, I can't help it.

I heard that horses here are auctioned off as low as $5:00! I wish I had my own property-I would buy them-fix them up and eventually try to find homes for some-but then again, I know this could cost a substancial amount of money unless one has a lot of great pasture and proper pens for working with them, as well as trainers and on and on, so guess maybe I'm glad I don't have my own property after all!

Thanks for listening to my stream of consciousness!
 

Laurie A Beltran
Breeding Stock
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 246
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 18, 2008 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cj-I know exactly how you feel! I wish there was more I could do also!
I have the land and the pens I just dont have extra to feed anyone else I'm already feeding 4 horses and I know Springs baby will start to eat a little shortly!

Maybe we could donated a little to the organization that helps these horses...Just a thought!

Take care CJ

L
 

Jenni Luttrell
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1024
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 18, 2008 - 10:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Its happening every where. In fact i just bought some from a guy who had 4 then 2 fgoaled mares dumped into his 250 acre hay feild last year. He tried to find owners but no one would claim them so he did and then sold them to me so he can cut his hay. I have caught 2 of them but am still working on the other 4. The sad part is they left the halters on the 2 i caught. They were very tight but hadnt caused any damage yet thankfully. I think both mini's I caught are bred but I know for certain that one is. These arent the first horses ive seen dumped around here and there were lots of free ones this winter as well. its a sad situation. to give an idea of how bad the market is I rescued a tri color Easy jet stallion he was broke to ride and very gentle however I started training professionally and had to many hot mares coming in and not enough pens that I had to haul him to auction. He was fat sassy and gorgous and he brought me 250$ my check was 190 after fees a few yrs ago you couldnt have touched him for under 3 grand
 

Jenni Luttrell
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1025
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, May 18, 2008 - 11:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

HERE ARE THE PICS OF MY NEW PREGO GAL I CANT BELEIVE SOME ONE WOULD DUMP HER http://good-times.webshots.com/photo/2287899440100781181WoMKdf?vhost=good-times
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 527
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, May 19, 2008 - 02:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni, she is gorgeous! What a beautiful girl. You would think they could have advertised and found a home! But I'm glad you got her.

That is something about the stallion. I am going to the auction Tuesday and see what this is all about. Watch! I'll come home with one!
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1632
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, May 19, 2008 - 10:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni~What a doll baby....I think you have been bitten by the mini bug :-)
 

Jenni Luttrell
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1028
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, May 19, 2008 - 06:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have to say I am enjoying the miniatures but horses are my bussiness and I cant keep them all so Angel is for sale. I would like to retain the foal however.
There seems to be more money in the ponies than in big horses lately and they dont eat as much. I still have my big horses and enjoy them just as much but for resale unless you have gold in a riding horse the minis seem to do better I will be keeping Charlotte tho she is 36 inches tall and thinks shes a dog. Her and my youngest daughter are friends lol she even shakes hands like a dog

THANK YOU both for your comments. I advertised my stallion for two months and he never sold i never even got an iquirey good luck at the sale

(Message edited by bugrace2000 on May 19, 2008)
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 542
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 02:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Can someone tell me what makes a great stallion? I realize that there might seem to be a very obvious answer, but here is where I am coming from.

If a stallion is well known in the show/performance, he seems to be more desirable. I know comformation, disposition and health are very important too. Take my little guy, for instance. Great bloodlines. Probably will be a nice stallion. Should I use him as stud? Takes very serious thought and commitment, of course, not to mention some special fencing and and so on.

I'm asking because it is so hard for me to choose a stallion for my mare. Lots of nice stallions, for sure, but how does one gauge the best (simply based on show and performance) from the very nice, but unknown?

I hope this makes sense.
 

Kim Peavy/ Sweetie 7/3/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Lovemysinbad

Post Number: 192
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 05:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

CJ - I think it depends on what you are wanting to breed for? Do you want to keep the foal and are breeding for a particular foal for yourself? Are you breeding because you want to sell the baby and if so, how will you market it, etc? I think with so much breeding going on today, you really need to know for what purpose you are breeding and have a definate plan for the foal in mind. Not saying you are not a responsible breeder or anything of that sort, but there are so many horses out there and folks breeding to just be breeding....I know I am not the first to have purchased a mare who was already in foal (not known to me) and yes, she had a nice baby, but with no particular breeding to say on the stallion side...she was just another average foal, and if I wanted to sell her as a weanling, in today's market, I'd be lucky to get $500.00 for her....so I hope folks are really thinking through before breeding to be sure they can provide for the foal and/or that the foal would be desired by someone to purchase and give it a good life....good luck in finding that right stallion for your intended purposes...Kim
 

Laurie A Beltran
Breeding Stock
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 250
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 09:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kim,
I couldn't have said it any better!

Cj-You might Keep this in mind when looking at your foal to become a breeding stallion. I took over a year looking at some 50 stallions I also did research on bloodlines, for me in the Arabian industry it makes a huge difference! To be a stallion he must not only be great HE must be OUTSTANDING! in pedigree,confirmation and personality! otherwise there just a great gelding!
at least thats my thoughts...

Take care,
L
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 321
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 09:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My opinion is that unless a stallion is just an absolutely stellar individual, then geld him! There are a lot of nice stallions out there that would be/should be good geldings.

Speaking from the stock horse perspective (Quarter Horses, Paints, Appaloosas, etc.), there are a lot of REALLY nice stallions that fill up the pages of the Journals, etc. In my opinion, probably about half of those animals should be geldings.

There are so many good stallions these days that unless a stallion has just superior conformation, outstanding athletic ability, exceptional bloodlines and/or combinations of all three, then he shouldn't be reproducing.
 

Linda Bauer --Rita foaled 4/25
Yearling
Username: Llazyt

Post Number: 85
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 09:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Kim, Laurie & Catherine, but would like to add one more thought. . Because of the availability of shipped semen you have so many more options of great horses to chose from. We no longer have to use a stallion just because he is close.
I also agree there are a lot of stallions out there that would make great geldings.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1245
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 02:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with everyone :-) You need to prove your stallion out there in the show ring to make him valuable in any way (this is after knowing he has fabulous bloodlines, conformation and temperment). This is very expensive and time consuming, if you can't do this it's not worth it. For what it costs to keep and show your own stallion, you could breed your mare ten times over with a very nice proven producer :-)
 

Jenni Luttrell
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1032
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 02:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am having a similar issue I bought as a weanling a beautiful Appaloosa colt with all intentions of keeping him intact. I had wanted to start a stud farm (still do) any how I got a steal deal on this colt he is now just 2yrs old and coming into himself he has color, conformation,pedigree and a wonderful laid back disposition. My problem is that with the rising cost of fuel and everything else plus the low horse market I'm no sure I can afford to show him so I am considering gelding him and just having one awsome gelding. i have thought of breeding him to a very very compatable mare and praying for a colt then gelding him and maybe id be in a better position by the time that baby hit the ground. but thats not a real sound bussiness plan
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1248
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 05:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni, it is really hard. I'm bringing my stallion home from the trainer's at the end of the month because I can't afford it anymore. I'm going to just trail ride him this summer and hopefully I'll be able to put him back in training in the fall. It's very frustruating when you have a quality stallion, the trainer loves him and wants to show him but the money is running out! Hopefully the horse market will turn around soon but I have a feeling that it's wishful thinking on my part.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1034
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 05:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tracy I so hope you can afford to get him back in training we were all looking forward to seeing him at nationals. I do a lot of training but have never shown a horse so this was going to be my first. I think the only way for the market to come back is if the slaughter houses open back up either that or if they become our daily transportation lol
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 546
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, May 20, 2008 - 07:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just to clarigy, in case there was any confusion, I won't buy a stallion from any auction. In fact, I probably wouldn't buy a stallion at all. There is a possibility I'd buy a horse from auction, but probably not.

There are so many available and I bought my one and only, bred and now foaled mare, from the local University because I trust Dr. Rodiek who is in charge of the QH Unit there.

I'm sorry to hear it is so hard for the some of you here to have a breeding program, due to the economy. Certainly, breeding several mares would help pay for the showing and hopefully leave enough left over after the other expenses. I hope you can work it out, Jennie and Tracy.

Sounds like a whole lot of work to me!
 

Jenni Luttrell
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1037
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 - 01:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I didnt buy my colt from auction however if you are wise and in the market you can get some great deals at auction especialy now. LOTS of well bred well broke horses go through auction cheap. I live in Arkansas and the economy here has always been a touch slower than the rest of the usa Unfortunately I am not into breeding several mares just to pay for showing him I will only breed to equal or better quality than he is also with out a show record it gets hard to make those bookings and come out ahead more less pay for showing him. I did come up with an idea tho I have several rodeos and roping cutting arenas around here they arent the biggest plces but if hes good at just one event and I can stay fairly local to attend them I might be able to pull it off
 

Laurie A Beltran
Breeding Stock
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 251
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 - 08:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tracy,
I totally understand about the expense of training not to mention all the fee's for the shows ect.. I think that's where creative thinking can come into play, I have a friend that had her WP Arabian with a very well known trainer.

showing and winning mostly everything in her class. She decided she couldn't afford the training fee's was going to completely pull out of that barn worked out a deal ( it benefits the trainer too!) now she only pays for half of the training fee's. My plan is I have a trainer that has shown Nationally with the arabian for over 30 years, I have struck a deal with her for part ownership of my Stallion all training fee's are waived. Maybe you can work out some plan to continue to show?

Just my thoughts....Since my Filly Summer is the last foal for my mare she will be shown in the future so I'm making plans now to put away as much as possible for the show fee's BUT is extremly hard when gas is over $4.00 gal
 

Samantha
Breeding Stock
Username: Dressage_diva333

Post Number: 170
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 - 12:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree training is expensive. Right now my Haflinger is in training with my Professional Dressage trainer, to get sold. I couldn't afford it anymore, so the agreement was made that I pay her the fees owed when he sells, and 5% commission.

Most trainers are willing to work out a deal :-)
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1662
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tracy~You have laid a good foundation for your young stallion. I personally thinking mentally with a younger horse not a bad idea to take a break do a little something else...like trail ride and don't under estimate your skills. You can probably build on his foundation to solidify what he has already learned.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1250
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 21, 2008 - 07:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks guys :-) My trainer said the same thing Jan, that it will probably do him some good to come home and trail ride for awhile. Good mental break! Right now I don't have an arena to ride in but that is a goal of ours to get an outdoor built. What I might do is start taking lessons on him and that way my riding gets better and he's still learning.

My trainer is actually building her own facility right now and my husband is a general contractor so we have briefly discussed work in trade for training. Not all hope is lost yet!
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 553
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, May 22, 2008 - 02:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank-you all for the comments. I've learned something and it helps a ton! I may or may not geld my boy, but have lots of time to decide. I would never keep a so-so stallion. He would have to be great, so I understand that showing him would confirm, or not, that is a quality stallion worthy of breeding.

I would never keep a stallion just to breed my mare.

I'm still looking for a stallion for my mare to breed to as soon as she comes into heat again. I am unsure of the markers I need to look for.

I also have the issue of my colt having a low IgG. So I will have to have him tested again before taking my mare anywhere, or having any other horse coming to the property. If it is still low, I will have to wait, which sucks, because I don't want her to be pregnant during the hot summer here, yet I don't want to wait either. She is such a nice horse, but is 18 now. I want two or three more foals from her before retiring her. But I have to think of her health and comfort as well.

Can you tell I'm still uncertain of what I'm doing here? LOL!



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