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First time stallion owner

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » First time stallion owner « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Anonymous
 
Posted From: 203.220.192.178
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 02:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have just recieve a new stallion as I wrote about in the Stallion and Lady Handlers forum. He is the first stallion that I have ever owned. And he is a very smart and quiet stallion and I really don't want to reck him or his respect for me??????? Any hints for this first time stallion owner?????????
 

Cheryl Johnson
Neonate
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2008 - 02:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry, can't help, but hope someone out there will answer because I think it is a really good question.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 995
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2008 - 02:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Get a knowledgable trainer to help you. This is not something that can be taught over the internet.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 961
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, March 17, 2008 - 10:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

dont get me wrong I love my stallions I own two but they can be very dangerous even the most quiet ones. Both of mine are good boys however I always make sure they have a rope halter on when I'm handling them. Even if im just giving them a love whenever I'm in the same space as them I make sure I have some way to at least somewhat control him if he was ever not nice. Also lots of handling and be sure to get a gentle trainer for your boy.
 

Cheryl Johnson
Neonate
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 6
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - 12:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't have an answer, but can share somewhat. I know a young woman who has a stallion who is perfectly behaved, even when around mares in heat, and even while riding him around them. She told she leaves him with her herd of mares all the time. I'm sure she probably seperates the pregnant ones at some point, but I didn't ask. I saw the stallion around open mares and he was calm. Not a flicker. Was something to see. She raised him, so that probably made a difference too.
 

Dorthy Brown
Breeding Stock
Username: Dodib

Post Number: 256
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 18, 2008 - 02:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had two stallions(still have one of them) they both are/were very calm stallions BUT you still need to keep your eyes on a stud a lot more than anyother horse. For a first time owner your best bet is to get someone experienced with studs involved to help you.
 

Cheryl Johnson
Weanling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 24
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, March 29, 2008 - 12:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have no rexpereince with studs, but I have talked with a few stallion owners and they are always watchful for anything that might set them off. They use more control and caution-always! One told me she can do anything with her stallion, but that she never feels as safe with him, as she does with her other horses. So I think the advice to get a gentle trainer sounds very good and eventhough I posted about the calm stallion, I know they can never be taken for granted. I'm glad for Dorothy's comments.
 

Catherine Owen
Yearling
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 91
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2008 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The main thing to keep in mind about a stallion, is that they are a horse and you treat them like any other horse, UNTIL: They Ask To Be Treated Differently --- And they will at some point.

Stallions are like mares or geldings in that each of them has their own personality and no two are alike. They also have testosterone thrown in.

Stallions are often-times not good animals to have around unless you are absolutely comfortable handling them. I think the handler has to be absolutely comfortable handling the stallion and the last thing you want to do is deal with them "tentatively" and have fear of them, and let them pick up on that. I think a lot of times people are fearful of a stallion and end up "picking on" him all the time and any horse is going to end up with an attitude after a significant amount of that.

My theory is that you treat them a lot like any other horse until they ask to be treated differently, then be prepared to crucify them (just a figure of speech, but you have to be swift and they have to know they screwed up and that you aren't going to tolerate it, and you have to get their attention and make it mean something) --- then let them alone and go back to treating them the same as any other horse. Don't just "pick" on one constantly. When you reprimand him, MEAN it and then let it alone. Some people can't out of fear and they shouldn't be dealing with a stallion.

If you are afraid of your stallion or have trepidation regarding handling him---then don't. You aren't going to do him any favors by being afraid of him. Either sell him or send him to a trainer that can deal with him and visit him on occasion.

I think a lot of stallion handling is day-to-day routine and establishing boundaries right off the bat. A lot of it is just general discipline not unlike any other horse. I have seen some mares and geldings that I wouldn't want to deal with because they had no general manners. Bad and dangerous behavior is not limited to just stallions.

We have had a couple of stallions in my life so far. One was raised from a foal and then sold as a four-year-old and and our family had purchased the other one when he was 8 months old and he died at the ripe old age of 28 on our farm.

Maybe part of it was that we basically raised both these horses and knew them inside out. 99% of the time you could trust them and they were the most easy going horses I have ever been around. Really smart too, I do think a stallion has a more active mind in general.

Once again, regarding management, the biggest things we did with them was:
1) They had their own 12'x24' stalls with 6 foot sides and their own turn-out paddocks and 3-acre pasture with 6 foot fences. Keep in mind that a 3-rail 4-foot high wood fence isn't going to be a great deterrent should a 16 hand 1,250 lb. stallion decide to go visit the mares next door. If you remove a lot of the opportunity and temptation, you have a better behaved animal (sort of like a teenager!)
2) They had plenty of turn-out time and were ridden/exercised almost daily. I am a big believer that stallions need a "job". Our old stallion was shown a lot (halter, western pleasure, trail, western riding) as a young horse (gotta get that show record on them and get them known) and in his latter year (thru his 20's) he had a second career as a rope horse. We won a lot of Thursday, Friday and Saturday night jackpot ropings with him and he relished working cattle. It gave him a job and something to do. Once again,I think a stallion's mind is a lot more active more of the time and they need something to do.
3) When breeding, we had a set routine with them. They had a seperate wide, thick leather halter with a chifney bit, etc. and that equipment was only used when they went to the collection shed. They knew when that equipment went on where they were headed. The collection shed was also in the opposite direction as the arena and other stuff and I swear they knew when that halter went on and they headed that way, then it was all "that" business.
Now, we never "live" covered mares, they were taught to mount a dummy, artificially collected, etc. We also tried to keep the days of the week and even the times (i.e., 10 am on Monday, Wednesday and Saturday) as exact as we could too.

I am ABSOLUTELY NO AUTHORITY but this has been my experience with two stallions to date. I know there are a lot of "horror" stories out there about bad behaving stallions, but then I could tell you some stories about bad behaving mares and geldings that would curl your hair! In fact, the "worst" horse I have handled to date was a mare. If she wasn't trying to "eat" you, then kicking your head off would suffice for her! I can't think of anything that either of the two stallions we have had EVER did that could compare with some of the tricks this mare pulled on almost a daily basis.

I think long story short, if you aren't comfortable handling a stallion and you have trepidation about it, then don't! It isn't a "bad" thing, some people just aren't comfortable around them.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1074
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Sunday, March 30, 2008 - 09:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Catherine, that was very well said and spot on :-)
 

Laurie A Beltran
Yearling
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 93
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Monday, March 31, 2008 - 09:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Catherine,
I couldn't have said that any better!
L
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 996
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 12:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree COMPLETELY Its also funny the worst horse ive ever handled was a mare. She would literally try to kill you by any means nessasary.
They to are just horses not man eating machines. All horses can kill or mame you not just stallions.
 

Michelle Richardson
Nursing Foal
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 11
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 01, 2008 - 09:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I so agree with the above statements. There is nothing more cruel than these beautiful stallions all closed up in the small stalls and never turned out or given a job. A stallion can be a wonderful and dangerous at the same time. Just be careful and keep in mind the natural nature of a horse. They need space to run, play and graze safely. "All horses need love, language and leadership in equal doses" Good luck!



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