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Worried about size of yearling...

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Worried about size of yearling... « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Shelley Graham
Yearling
Username: Shelley

Post Number: 56
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Wednesday, December 26, 2007 - 12:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I hate how all horses are considered a year older as of Jan 1. Because as things stand now, I have a decent sized paint yearling filly, but after Jan 1, she will appear to be a very small 2 year old! Right now she stands at 14.2. Mom is 15.0 and dad is 15.1. I believe she will eventually get to 15 hands, but I don't feel that she will be large enough in the spring or even fall of 2008 to start under saddle! I understand that it isn't really height that determines readiness for saddle training, but I don't know how to determine when she will be strong enough for it. Do 2 year olds generally start to fill out? This is my first baby and I'm not familiar with growth patterns. Any experienced opinions would be appreciated!
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 431
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Wednesday, December 26, 2007 - 04:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Shelley, I breed Arabians which tend to mature slower than Paints but I don't break my horses until they are 3 (and that is by their birth date, not the Jan 1st date) and I only get on their back a dozen of times. I really don't start training them and riding them daily until they are 4 or even 5. Now, I ride dressage so birth date really is a moot point, I'm not showing them in halter or futurity classes. If you want a good riding horse and are not out there showing in Class A shows, I would wait until after her 2nd birthday (actual date). Just my opinion :-)
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 445
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, December 26, 2007 - 06:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

plz wait until your filly is at least 2 1/2 by her actual birth date before starting under saddle. I introduce my foals to the saddle for the first time at 2 1/2yrs old. At 3yrs old we start light riding then at 4yrs we get down to bussiness. I am also a light rider if I was heavier I'd wait until 3-4 before starting any riding. Although young horses may be able to stand up to a good size work load now they pay for it later, becoming sway backed and lame much earlier than they might have had they been given proper growth time.
 

Terry Waechter 5 march foals
Yearling
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 92
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, December 26, 2007 - 09:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We used to start 2 year olds by that I mean they were probably 2 and a half and we took knee X rays and if the knees were not closed we waited another 6 months....by starting I mean some round pen work with a saddle on, mounting and about 6-10 rides by a light rider then out to the field for another year.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 451
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, December 26, 2007 - 11:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Terry - I very much agree with you. The pounding of young horses is my biggest problem with the racing industry. I wish there wasnt 2yr old races.
 

Shelley Graham
Yearling
Username: Shelley

Post Number: 57
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 08:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK! I won't even consider starting her until at least fall 2008 (birth date is April). But if she doesn't seem physically mature enough, I have no problem waiting for 3 or 3 1/2. I've been led to believe that horses were started no matter what, at 2 years old, and it just doesn't seem feasible for this particular horse. I love her to death, and would never intentionally hurt her.
 

Shelley Graham
Yearling
Username: Shelley

Post Number: 58
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 09:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

But I am still curious....Do horses tend to fill out during the 2nd year? Or is it a more gradual process over the next few years?
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 948
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Shelley,

I actually introduce a very light pony saddle early. My 4 month old has been ponied out already with one on. I do lots of ponying, hand walking, tying up different locations, etc. But my breed is small and slow growers and did not put any weight on a saddle till they hit 2 1/2 actual birthday then someone really light and 3 times a week of light light riding for 1/2-1 hour then at 3 (actual birthday) we do longer straight trails, some slight hills and at 4 we added lots of hill riding. Best to really be on the safe side and not try to early each horse is different, physically, mentally and emotionally. Good legs good horse...
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 435
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 01:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Shelley, I think it tends to be a gradual process on the filling out and each horse is different. My stallion I got on his back when he was 3 but I currently have a 3 yr old filly that looks very immature still so I'm going to wait. Better safe than sorry! :-) Like Jan was stating, I don't think there is anything wrong with putting a saddle on her back or a bridle on to get her used to it, I just wouldn't get on her back yet.
 

Shelley Graham
Yearling
Username: Shelley

Post Number: 59
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 03:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yaaaaaa....I'm glad to hear that there is no shame in waiting until the horse is actually 'ready'. I feel pressure from the show community to have a horse started at 2 and in junior/green horse classes by age 3. But like u said...why risk hurting a growing baby?!?! I'll take it slow and just show my 'old' (age 9)pleasure horse!
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 452
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 08:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is what I go by when guessing what a horse will fill out to. I look them over real good at 6months old. Its been my expierence that thats what they'll fill out to be as adults. at one & most of 2 they look terrible, By three you can get a good visual again and 99% of the time by 5 they are done growing all together. A horse doesnt reach its full height until 3yrs then spends the next to filling out and maturing. The lipizaners that do all thse special shows arent even started till age 7. Stand up and do whats right for your baby and youll be showing long after the others quit with fewer vet bills to boot.
 

Terry Waechter 5 march foals
Yearling
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 95
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Thursday, December 27, 2007 - 09:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is a small study in photos of one of my fillies taken at a little less than a year, then at almost 2 1/2 and lastly at 3+. She will be four in middle spring and is presently 16.1+ and about 1300 lbs (she is 8 mo pregnant now)

another filly has followed about the same path...tonight I measured her and she was almost 16.2....so I would say at least age 4 for total growth.

Terry

[IMG]http://i185.photobucket.com/albums/x58/terryberry_bucket/VP5M7281-01.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i185.photobucket.com/albums/x58/terryberry_bucket/CLASE759.jpg[/IMG]
[IMG]http://i185.photobucket.com/albums/x58/terryberry_bucket/kudustandg_2.jpg[/IMG]
 

Beth
Nursing Foal
Username: Beth13

Post Number: 14
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 06, 2008 - 09:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Shelley, I have a two year old filly as well. She's been running up in the back paddocks because thats where the best feed is and she is very solid, not fat, but solid muscle. Her dam is the same as her, both only about 14.2- 15hh but really solid. Conformation wise they are practically identical- or will be when the filly's older. The filly's sire is a palomino Arab Thoroghbred, he's about 16hh and finely built. The drought isn't helping, but he'll never be solid. The dam's a gorgeous golden palomino Australian Stock Horse/ Quarter horse. The filly's a golden chestnut with a flaxen mane and tail and the Arab and the Quarter horse are the sides that show most in her. BUT... I have an Arab cross mare whose rising 8yrs, about 14- 14.2hh who metabolisizes food very quickly- your filly could be like her. I think the filling out process is different with every horse and assumptions like 'oh they'll all be ready at two' should never be made.
 

Shelley Graham
Yearling
Username: Shelley

Post Number: 60
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Wednesday, January 09, 2008 - 09:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Beth- My biggest concern about her size at this point is length. She seems way too short in the back just yet to fit a normal sized saddle pad or saddle. (dam and sire both not lacking in length, so I'm not worried that she won't eventually stretch out). But I agree, assuming all horses are ready for saddle training at 2 is a huge mistake! I'll play with her this summer, and put a pony saddle on her....let her get used to the feel...and see where she 'stands' towards sept/oct. My gut tells me we will most likely wait until spring of her 3rd year to send her to a trainer. I adore her, and enjoy doing groundwork with her, so I'm in no hurry to send her away and no longer feel pressured by the 'show crowd' to start her as a 2 year old.
 

corina gabel
Nursing Foal
Username: Newyearsbaby05

Post Number: 13
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2008 - 08:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Why dont you try a mule saddle.... as every one gasps.... my mustang is short backed she fits a mule saddle great and now days they dont look any different. The under side is more angled and shorter to accomodate the sort back. You can find one really cheap that will fit a normal sized adult.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 537
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2008 - 10:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think more than her back being short the main issue was waiting until her bones can handle the work. If she's not filled out and still looking like a baby, probably shouldn't be ridden yet.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 699
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Sunday, January 13, 2008 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Tracy 100% if she's not ready she's just not ready dont push it even if you can get equipment to fit.
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 962
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, January 16, 2008 - 03:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

ok I have a filly who is 22 months old right now, she stands at 15'1 and her dam is 15'3 hands, she is tall enough and long enough to saddle, but she is still young looking and I would not even think about starting her under saddle at this point, I do some longeing (walk only) with a saddle on and I use a circincle on her with a bridle and long reins and ground drive her. your filly is at the perfect age to do this with her, but I would not think about riding her for a while. I like 2 1/2 to 3 years old for riding, the colts seem to mature a little faster then those fillies but each horse is an individual. I raise QH some breeds mature even slower.

Here is a picture of my filly 22 months old, standing next to her dam.
http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b399/cmpsp1/PICT0037-2.jpg



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