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Coyotes

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Coyotes « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 33
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Will coyotes attack a foal? Can 1 do it by itself or does it have to be a pack? We have a mare that should be foaling by april. I say SHOULD because we dont know when she was bred but april of last yr was her last month with stud. Any help is apprecaited. We live in WV and have lots of coyotes close to the house. \clipart {chewfingernailsThanks to everyone.}
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 190
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 02:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes a coyotes can and will. The main danger is during and right after labor. Once mom and baby have recovered from labor and the afterbirth is gone your pretty safe. Its usually a pack but lone hungry one might get brave enough. Coyotes are usualy pretty cowardly
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 718
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 02:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just make sure the mare and foal are put in at night, I had a pack of coyotes attack a foal who was a week old and in an acre turn out over night, next morning only a bloody drag mark under the fence. your usually pretty safe after the foal is a month or so old, those young ones are pretty quick and hang really close to momma when they sense danger. Jenni is right though they are pretty cowerdly, but brave when they are in a pack.
 

Tiffany Wright
Breeding Stock
Username: Wrightkoss

Post Number: 386
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dusty - As Jenni and Jan both said, coyotes will go after a foal but after everything is cleaned up, you should be pretty safe. That momma isn't going to let a coyote get too close to that foal and if she attempts to chase it off, she will most probably be successful. If they come at her in a pack, she might have a little bit more of a challenge on her hands but in my experience they send one or two out for scouting and then bring the pack in when they find something that they can get. They aren't like wolves so much in their travel and attack methods. Coyotes usually go for varmits rather than large animals which is why you should be fine following disposal of the afterbirth.
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 60
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 04:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Eastern Coyotes do not pack. They live in mating pairs, and the only time you see a "pack" is before the cubs leave. If you are in the eastern part of the continent and have had problems, your issue is more likely wild dogs. They do pack, and can cause all sorts of trouble.
We have had a coyote chase a foal, in broad daylight. It was a crime of opportunity, the coyote was passing through, and the foal was less than 24 hours old, so probably still had that newborn smell. Luckily the foal's owner and I were supervising the turnout, and chased the coyote off.
Since then we're pretty careful the first few days, and even a bit longer with the ponies!
 

Dianne Edwards
Breeding Stock
Username: Mamaedwards

Post Number: 180
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 10:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dont know if its true or not, but I have been told that donkey make good protector for the pasture?? I know people use Pyrenese (spelling) as herd guard dogs for goats & sheep, maybe that is idea for you? some of you others probably know more about this than me, what do you think?
 

Tiffany Wright
Breeding Stock
Username: Wrightkoss

Post Number: 389
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 12:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dianne - that is true, however, with the donkey if they are going to make a good protector for your pasture, it is quite possible that it will be a good protector from EVERYTHING including YOU. Also, if you are in the business of having foals, I don't recommend a donkey. Some of you have trouble with your geldings, imagine about double those problems with a protective donkey.

As far as getting a dog to protect the horses in your pasture, I don't recommend it unless you want a dog herding your horses. Just my opinion on that though.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 198
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 01:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I definately dont recomend a donkey in the pasture were you have foals. They can get very mean and aggressive killing foals on site. I know people who diagree saying they are the best, but i've had friends loose foals to the donkey and he was a nice one.
I do recomend a dog but be very careful of the kind you get one that is not interested in livestock is best i think. You dont want a dog chasing your horses. Better yet get a proffwessionaly trained dog thats been raised with horses and cows.
 

Lori Coleman
Breeding Stock
Username: Editorlady

Post Number: 154
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 01:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a great German Shepherd who will herd if he knows I'm trying to; otherwise he sits and watches over them. Got him as a rescue, so he wasn't trained to do this. The previous shepherd we had was the same--he'd try to "help" us, but never chased just because the horses were running around. He had had extensive training as a police dog. This is all anecdotal, but my 2 shepherds have been great. They chase away everything (including opossums, which is a good thing! we have zero rodent tolerance here) and won't back down to even an agressive coon or a coyote.
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 39
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 01:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks to everyone-- I agree about the dog thing. I have a border collie. She is very good dog. But if one of the 5 horses we have here start moving then she has to chase, its bred into her. We got her for the kids. Before we got the horses we have now. So I wouldnt get another one now with the horses.
 

Colleen Beck
Yearling
Username: Gypsycreations

Post Number: 72
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dusty, see my post under "two new colts" to see what can happen when border collies chase young horses. I would never own another one.
 

Tiffany Wright
Breeding Stock
Username: Wrightkoss

Post Number: 393
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 03:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have 3 border collies and we have trained them to stay out of the pasture with the horses. They are fabulous cattle dogs and remember that they are bred to work livestock so if you don't train them differently and discipline them for doing something wrong (like chasing the horses) they are going to continue. I wouldn't give up my dogs or my horses for anything and they work excellent together for the cattle but any cattle dog has to know and understand its boundaries... and that is where people come in.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 203
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 04:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If you own a working dog such as border collies or heelers you have to keep them busy and TRAIN them. I suggest a proffesional trainer that has a specialty in working dogs unless you have lots of expierence with these types of dogs. They can be amazing animals or hell on four legs. They are high energy intelegant dogs and need to work off that energy and be challenged. If they arent trained and worked they find ways of entertaining themselves that arent so good.
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 41
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 11:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

COLLEEN---SO SAD ABOUT YOUR LITTLE FILLY! I did go and read what you posted. I understand what you are saying. Yes my Annie chases the horses some but if we see her and call her she usaully stops and comes to us. She doesnt run them for any distance or length of time. So im not really concerned about her causing injury to my horses or my mares foal that is coming. Three of the five horses are my moms and are in a different fence from my mare and filly. Annie mostly likes chasing hers cause they are young and are more active. She tends not to bother my mare cause she kicks. So I dont worry so much about Annie.
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 63
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 - 05:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am not going to read the post, I've got enough sadness going on right now without reading about other people's. Sorry for whatever happened.
My donkey is GREAT. But I would not have bought him for the purpose. We actually bought his mother for coyote protection, she was good once she had him, would chase even the poor barn cat out of the field. He was something of a "surprise", and two donkeys was excessive, so we ended up selling the jenny, and kept him. He has turned out to be the best babysitter, and he is quite protective of his herd in general. He is excellent with other equines, but not the biggest fan of people, however, not to the point where you can't remove a horse from the herd. He's just not a pet, not a lovey sort.
But terrific with foals of all ages, and as often we only have one foal in a year, he will play with them.
However, I would never recommend someone buy a male donkey for this purpose. A jenny is a better choice.
A good farm dog or two of a size large enough is an excellent deterrent to a coyote - we had far less problems with the coyotes coming right into the yard when we had dogs, but you want to make sure it's a big dog, and seeing as coyotes usually work in pairs, two dogs are better than one.
I've heard good things about the Great Pyrenees, but if you want one as a herd protector, make sure you buy one from a breeder who breeds them for that purpose and they are quite pricey, don't just think that any old Great Pyrenees will do the job.
 

Lisa D.
Weanling
Username: Lisa_d

Post Number: 40
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 - 11:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have heard that a Llama will also work as a herd protector, now if there is any truth to that I dont know.

But we thought that that might work for the minis because we are moving to were there are lots of coyotes and with a mini foal on the way I am worried.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 286
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 22, 2007 - 12:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa - Ive heard of it and know a lady that uses one she loves it how much good it does for protecting I dont know but she hasnt had a problem with it harming anything
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 492
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 22, 2007 - 01:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A friend of mine had llamas. Grace used to pasture with them.
I too, have heard that they are good guard animals. But, never saw evidence of it! Except, that a big male wasn't too fond of me when I made one of the baby llamas cry....darn near got trampled. Otherwise, they were fairly quite animals.
However, there were also 2 mini donkeys....wow, talk about watch out. If a dog got into the pasture, it better watch it's back. They'd take out strange cats, dogs, snakes...all sorts of stuff.
The donkeys were VERY mischevious. Drag out anything, get into everything...even pulled out Graces tail socks (thats when she went in with the llamas).
The llamas were neat creatures, but didn't fair well in our extreme heat (TX). If you live in a cooler climate...they could be an option.
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 71
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 29, 2007 - 04:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have heard that llamas are good too. I saw one at a fair, and every time a dog walked by that llama never took its eyes of the dog until it was gone, so I can believe it's possible. However, some donkeys are better protectors than others, could very well be the same with llamas.
 

L Detweiler
Neonate
Username: Msfarab

Post Number: 8
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We live in PA and have coyotes in our area that do pack up, we have a pack now that is 8-10 adults, and not feral dogs or pups. During last deer hunting season several hunters on our farm and the neighbors farm witnessed the pack at work, although there are "chase" coyotes that do separate from the pack on the behind of deer.... my daughter & I saw one coyote chasing 2 doe and called my husband on his cell phone farther up the mountain and they did get to him and were still chasing the doe. My husband did shoot one of them. The next morning (at dawn) our neighbor witnessed a pack coming out of the ravine behind our bank barn, meeting up with a lone howling coyote 35 acres up the mountian in a field by his property, so they might split up for short periods but there are many together, too.

Now we are setting up "night calls" with distress recorders and lie in wait for them.

We have heard the Pyrennes dogs are excellent to raise "with" a herd of horses and are great protectors of the group. They live with the horses permanently. Find more information about other breeds as well or get a distress call and a few willing hunters and thin them out yourself.
We don't let our mares foal outside, and keep the mares with foals near the barn until summer.
Good Luck.
Lesley
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 793
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, April 02, 2007 - 11:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I hate to say this but Coyotes can and do pack in the East Coast as well as the west I am a State Parks and Forestry Ranger and can tell you honestly that Coyotes can and do pack yes even eastern Coyotes I live and work in PA. I have responded to attacks caught on tape by home owners who have dogs and cats attacked by packs of Coyote's (not wild dogs), however I have seen dog attacks too. rule of thumb, pickup the afterbirth, keep the foal indoors in the dusk,dawn and evening hours. prevention is key.
 

Roxanne
Yearling
Username: Roxanne

Post Number: 51
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 03, 2007 - 10:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

OK this confirms what I thought about them packing. I live in Northeastern PA and I can hear a pack of coyotes that sound like they are maybe a mile or so from my house. I have heard that I don't need to worry about them, but I am still very leary and cautious about them. There's always a first, right?
 

E Watkins
Weanling
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 27
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 04, 2007 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jan H- I did not realize you were from the east side of the U.S. I grew up in WV and travel back home every year. On the subject of coyotes, I never in all my years growing up heard a coyote in the area where we lived. (and I spent many a night out in the woods hunting with my father) Are they something that was introduced into the area? Until I came to KS I never saw one in the wild, but then, I'd never seen a bobcat, pheasant or wild turkey either and they are abundant in this area. Just one more reason I love it here!
In case you missed the other post, we had a filly born last night, I've not seen her yet as I was headed to work when she was discovered but I hear she's a solid bay. ( at least it's a SHE!) Here's hoping Avery and Sasha do a repeat!

Ev



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