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Predators that attack full grown horse.

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Predators that attack full grown horse. « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 32
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 01:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I live in West Virgiia, and we have black bears and I have heard we have mountain lions. I know a mt. lion will attack. But will it leave the horse if it is spooked? And do black bears attack w/ or without a cub?

My sisters friend lives higher in the mountains then I do. And she had a grown Arabian mare. Last week she was attacked and whatever it was tore her ear 1/2 off and ripped her scull open and part of her brain was exposed. She had claw marks on her. The owner didnt call anybody to look at the mare they just put her down. They dont think a mt. lion did it they say a bear. I would like to hear anyones experience or advice. As I have a 19mth old filly and her mother that is bred and will be foaling by april.Thanks.
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 717
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 02:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I work for parks and forestry and I can tell you that black bears do not attack full grown horses. I live around them, work around them and have horses in black bear territory. Cougars (mtn. lions will attack horses and most time will go for the head and neck area, more than likely the horse was grazing or sleeping when the attack occured, cougar jump at the head area and bite the ear/head to hold onto the horse then it try to bite the top of the head or neck. many victims of cougar attacks have deep lacerations of the head and neck area. Black bears have been known to kill small domestic animals such as rabbits, cats and small dogs, there have even been attacks of lambs and one report of a group of small piglets. It is very rare very very rare to see a black bear attack larger animals unless of course that they are protecting their young, but most mother bears will not walk that close to human habitations with young cubs in tow. As a precaution when you have young animals/foals ect. have them in at night and near the house with barking dogs (big dog) during the day, a young horse can look like easy prey to a larger predator.
 

Tiffany Wright
Breeding Stock
Username: Wrightkoss

Post Number: 384
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 02:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dusty - It is hard to say without seeing it if it was a bear or cougar however, it sounds more like a bear with the damage that was done. I had a cougar last spring that chased my horses, luckily it let off and never got any of them. In my experience, the younger the animal, the more brave they are. Also, keep in mind that if you are going to shoot an animal that is after your horses, make sure that you kill it because an injured animal is far more dangerous and aggressive than a healthy one.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 191
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 03:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have had 2 horses killed by a mt lion. One was a 1500lb mare. She had gashes on her back, withers and neck were the lion had jumped from a tree onto her back. The lion raked her kneck till it slit her throat. It was a female lion with two cubs one got under the mare and laid her belly open. The cubs were young and she could have done it on her own without them.
Last year I lost a 3month old filly to a big Tom he ran the heard getting along side the baby he swatted her head hard causing brain damage but it did not crush the skull or kill her. She had to be put down. In my expierence lions like to ambush and stalk their prey and although they do tend towards weaker animals they still like to "play" with their food. Prefering it to run alot like a house kitty and a mouse. Lions can get very brave and sneaky I've even had them on my porch and roof. I do own very lg dogs and even a hound they work great for an alarm system but dont bother mostof the lions. Good news is lions solitary animals and travel around a lg territory (so if you dont see it for a while it doesnt mean it moved). If you watch careful you can usually time when it comes in and out of your area. Sometimes another lion will infringe on its teritory exspecialy if its not in the area so ou still have to watch some. You usually only have one to worry about at a time.
I dont have much expierence with black bears but have friends who have lost livestock to grizzlies. A grizzly has enough force in a swat to decapitate a horse if it wants and will take down lg livestock. Grizzlies will come into domestic areas.
A horse may not be a black bears prey of choice but they are a predator and horses are prey so given the right circumstanceanything is possible. Dogs do work pretty good for bears and certain dogs are even bred for it.

(Message edited by bugrace2000 on March 13, 2007)
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 59
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 04:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jan H, I must disagree about the black bears. There was a horse killed and another attacked by a bear (now I don't know for sure that it was a BLACK bear, but I am certain we don't have other kinds of bears in Central Ontario) on the same property.
This was on the news BTW, it is not a "rural legend".
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 993
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 09:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My neighbor had a mare attacked by a black bear a few years ago, it tore up her rump and hock area pretty good. We do not have grizzlies either , only black bears. so i guess i would be careful with young and babies.
I have never had coyotes attack my horses or foals, they do however rumage around in their piles in the pasture only 50 feet away, but we try to scar them off when we see them.
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 468
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 11:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good lord....the worst thing we have around here is a stray dog or feral cat.
Bobcats and coyotes are still reported here and there..but are certainly no threat to horses in my area.
No reported attacks from the local rabbits or kamikazee squirrels :-).
Do have to keep an eye out for cottonmouth & copperheads.
You folks in bear and hungry moutain lion country..be careful out there!!
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 35
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 11:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

THANKS TO EVERYONE I sure will pass this info along. I havent seen a Mt. Lion around here ever. But have seen Panthers and black bears. The mare of course couldnt be saved but the owners didnt even have the DNR to come look at the wounds to see if they could say what animal it was. But if it were a Bear how would it get into her fenced in area {THAT IS IF THE FENCE IS IN GOOD SHAPE}??? And those people {I DONT KNOW PERSONALLY} seem to think that Bears are the only true thing that a horse is totally scared of. Anybody know how true this is?? THANKS
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 197
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 12:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dusty - A panther and a Mt lion are the same animal its just that the black ones are usually refered to as pumas or panthers. I can give a much more in depth description of a lion attack if you really want to know but its pretty graphic.
Horses are scared of many things even a moose will send a horse through the roof and unless you have a real special fence bears can easily get in. Bears are not nessasarly the loud cumbersome things they are portraid as. Bears can be silent quick and even agile they also have an amazing sense of smell.
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 36
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 07:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the offer of the story Jenni. But I dont think I wanna know. I always asumed that Panthers are Panthers and Mt. Lions are Mt. Lions. One black one tan and white.
 

Dianne Edwards
Breeding Stock
Username: Mamaedwards

Post Number: 173
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 08:16 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My Dad has a dairy and had a real problem with coyotes attack cows as they were having calves. They would attach will she was in labor and kill the calf before it was all the way born. killed a young heifer while in labor too.
 

cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 135
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 09:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

LOL I am in Florida, we have gators and snakes!
 

Colleen Beck
Yearling
Username: Gypsycreations

Post Number: 70
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 09:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Heather, We are in Texas also (east of Dallas) and we have heard reports of Mt. Lion attacks locally. About two months ago, we found a huge paw print out by our barn..hmmmm
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 37
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 01:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni I looked up Mt. Lions & panthers just to get a better understanding about what you were saying. I guesss know one ever told me that and I just always thought they were two different animals. So thanks for telling me.
 

Tiffany Wright
Breeding Stock
Username: Wrightkoss

Post Number: 390
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 01:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dusty - you nailed it right on the head with one's black, one's tan and white. That is dang near the only difference between a panther and a mountain lion. They both will go after the same type of prey in the same type of manner.

As for a bear - if they want into an area, there are not many fences that are going to keep them out unless specially made - especially just a general livestock fence. IF they can't find an easy way over it, they will just go thru it. Barbwire, electric, new zealand, woven wire...
 

Dusty Housh
Weanling
Username: Belles_momma

Post Number: 40
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 01:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

THANKS TIFFANY- I just didnt think a bear could go or would go thru a fence. We have them but they dont bother anything. I think the dogs keep them ran out.So I dont know alot of things the will do.
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 470
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 03:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Colleen,

I live in the Houston area. Years ago, there was still a lot of active wildlife. It truly is a shame, as even the deer have been pushed to the limit...and have nowhere to go. More common to see ones hit by a car, than alive.
I get more concerned about roaming dogs. But, it's not really an issue for me...we are fenced and crossed fenced with no climb wire. Only thing that gets through are the rabbits (and we like them). Some coyotes that have remained, but rarely seen.
Now, get a bit further NW of where I am....there is still areas where the bobcats and coyotes can be spotted.
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 64
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, I don't know about horses being scared of moose. Maybe if there's only a couple of horses. We had a bull moose come right up into the yard at one place where I worked. He was getting way too close so we sicced the cattle dog on him, and he ran out to the back pasture. Well sure enough, a couple minutes later we see the moose legging it across the pasture with 15 horses in hot pursuit.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 283
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 - 10:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've done lots of outfitting and high counrty riding. My husband has even had a moose charge horse and ive had more than one horse try and bolt at the sight of a moose. And if that dont do it try loading a quartered moose on a pack horse. If the horse can smell it have fun!!!!!!!
 

E Watkins
Neonate
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 22, 2007 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni- where do you ride? we travel to WY each year for our vacation and ride. I'm just waiting for a moose or elk to come out of the woods one of these days and scatter the horses. So far, we've been lucky, but the day is coming when we'll cross paths. There are also mountain lions and bear in the area but we've yet to see one. A couple of years ago we did find a 1/2 eaten elk on the trail though, so I'm certain they are around. I keep telling my husband when we cross with one of these animals, it's every man/woman/horse for themselves ! :-)
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 292
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Thursday, March 22, 2007 - 08:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

E. Watkins - I've done tons of riding in north west MT. The Bob marshal wilderness, Glacier Park and the North Fork area. Done a bunch in the bull mountains by billings too. A peice of advice if you can manage it is dont run!!! Trust me its very hard to convince 1200lbs of horseflesh not to bolt when its staring a moose in the face just slowly get the hell out of its way. LOL
 

E Watkins
Neonate
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 6
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Friday, March 23, 2007 - 11:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenni- LOL, I can tell you, my mare is going to snort and want to run like hell. As I said, it'll be every man for himself ( or woman in this case ) My spouse has insisted on taking the grandkids with us a couple of times ( against my better judgement ) I still believe that it's a matter of time until something bad happens because a rider has come along with us that isn't able to manage a horse that's spooked. I just ride at the front of the group anymore, that way, I don't have to watch what is going on behind me.



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