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Ulcers in foals

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Ulcers in foals « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Megan Diehl
Weanling
Username: Megan

Post Number: 38
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 - 02:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a 7 month old belgian colt that coliced for the first time last night. Well a couple things led up to this. First he had tipped over his water so he had none all day. And all weekend someone else had been feeding him extra feed.
He was fine once the vet got there but it was pretty scary till then.
She thinks he has stomach ulcers. Now another vet from the same clinic treated my 13 AQHA gelding for ulcers just a few months ago.
Can some one help me determine wether they are trying to push ucler meds or is this more common than I think!
Thanks!
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 323
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, September 26, 2006 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Megan,

ABSOLUTELY use the ulcer medication..they are not just trying to "push" the medicine on you.
Gastric ulcers are very common in foals, especially after weaning.
Anytime a horse, but specifically young horses, have some sort of stress (like illness, colic, injury, even showing), they become at risk exponentially for ulcers.
I have treated my colt with ulcer medicine multiple times just as a preventative. I know he has had them...but have used it when I felt (and vet) that he COULD develop them...using it prophylactically.
A few weeks ago, my colt also colicked...same age as your colt. I wouldn't leave the hospital without the Gastrogard.
So, yes, if your vet recommends it I would use it. If nothing else, it will help prevent them since he has been stressed.
I have used the Gastrogard and also compounded Omeprazole. Gastrogard is the only medicine on the market proven to HEAL ulcers.
Best of luck,
Heather
 

Megan Diehl
Weanling
Username: Megan

Post Number: 39
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Wednesday, September 27, 2006 - 09:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you for your help. I just don't understand why he would have ulcers now. We weaned him 4 months ago.
We did start him on Ranitadine(?) and the Gastrogaurd is coming.
He didn't eat his hay last night and was not to excited about his grain this am.
Any other suggestions? Does this sound right to be ulcers?
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 680
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, September 27, 2006 - 09:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Normally with a ulcer (coming from a person on the tb race track) the horses will eat hay and no grain if they are suffering from ulcers(again there are those exceptions as well). ?

This has also been told to me by our vets as well as we thought we had a mare that had ulcers, but proved not to.

I have also read that it is best to feed hay before feeding grain(as most of us do it the opposite way)It has to do with the way the digestive system works best.

Horses are also a grazing animal, that is why tbs tend to get ulcers easiers than most because of the way their day is structured. You should provide "grazing" opportunities for the horses for several hours out of the day. Their digestive system again works best for this type of situation.

Just some food for thought.

HOpe your fellow gets better.

(when my mare went off feed--no one else in the barn did --- once we had a new batch of feed, she began to eat again. ?? Don't know what happened, did she feel that there was a problem with it and no one else did ?? --decided it wasn't ulcers :-) )

Make sure you look at every possible senario to try to find answers before juming to conclusions.

Kim
 

Megan Diehl
Weanling
Username: Megan

Post Number: 40
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Wednesday, September 27, 2006 - 11:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks again. He is out all day and only in at night with access to hay all night. We make sure they eat hay for a bout 1/2 hour when we bring them in to make sure.
I guess I just worry because he is still such a baby. And my gut tells me that something is wrong with him. I had the same feeling when they told me my gelding had ulcers.
Thank you again for all your help.
 

Ruth
Nursing Foal
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 17
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Saturday, September 30, 2006 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My foal developed ulcers at a month old, probably in response to being treated for an umbilical cord infection. She was on cimetidine for a month and no troubles since. We are weaning her next weekend and I am definitely going to ask the vet if we should put her on something just in case.
In her case we discovered the ulcers because she developed diarrhea and stopped nursing.



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