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Proudcut gelding

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Miscellaneous and Suggestions for a New Topic Category » Proudcut gelding « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Carla Schlatter (66.43.225.169)
Posted on Thursday, June 28, 2001 - 10:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a gelding regelded due to very bad stallion like behavior. He had a lot of connective tissue left but no testicle. I was wondering does anyone know how long it takes for the testosterone to leave his body? I have been told anywhere from three days to six months or longer. It has been a month and no improvement. Thank you.
 

Kelly (63.172.47.199)
Posted on Friday, June 29, 2001 - 12:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You may be dealing with a learned behavior, not testosterone.

Even a young stallion can become aggressive and retain this stallion-like attitude, after being gelded, if not corrected. the older the horse, the more entrenched the behavior can be.

You can expect an improvement soon. Do not expect the surgery to erase all learned behavior. You may need help from a professional who specializes in stallions. A few sessions and tips on behavior modification can certainly help. Your gelding may need a little help understanding his new situation. Once he realizes the new order of things, all should go smoothly there after.
 

les joiner
Posted From: 152.163.189.231
Posted on Tuesday, May 13, 2003 - 03:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a seven year old stallion I gelded, he was a goof ball before and is one now. Kellys right some times you can not erase seven years of bad raising
 

Peggy A Barker
Neonate
Username: Peggy72837

Post Number: 1
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 12:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a 5 year old stallion gelded in Dec 04. He was pretty well behavied with the other geldings for a while. But now he is running them down. He wants to fight. He is much worse now. HELP!!!
What can I do to make things better. ???
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.143
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 10:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Peggy- He is obviously the dominate force in that "herd" group. It usually continues until one of the others, or a new herd member becomes the dominate factor. Even with a new herd member that may be more dominate, that does not insure that he will not still run the others. If he does this at a particulare time, feeding for instance, then you might be able to feed him a distance apart from the others.

I have had to remove a horse from the herd group for the same reason. Not only was he making trouble for the other horses, but he continued that mind set outside the pasture invironment.

I had him stalled separately and had to reestablish my dominance over him. He was attempting to buck riders off and have his way when under saddle. It took some firm, repetitive training, but it worked out. His is always in a individual enclosure, with access to other horses for social contact, but not in with them.
 

Sandra K. Kidder
Neonate
Username: Sandysz

Post Number: 4
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 10:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi all. I have a 19 year old App gelding that I purchased a year ago last Christmas eve. He is the greatest "puppy dog" that you could ask for. Last spring he decided that he would breed all of the mares and kill all the geldings. Progesterone once a week finally adjusted to 5 cc has done the trick. I have started it again this year,after the behavior returned and it is working great. My vet recommended this. Please, check with yours to see if it is an answer.
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.66
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 11:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've had to do that as well, but only as a final option. It did do the trick!
 

Peggy A Barker
Neonate
Username: Peggy72837

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Saturday, May 14, 2005 - 11:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks I will call my vet about the Progesterone. I have kept him from the other geldings but he has jumped a fence and hurt one already. I like him alot and he is a good ride. My kids trail ride on him but I can't have this behavior going on. Thanks again.
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.169
Posted on Sunday, May 15, 2005 - 01:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Whoa! He acutally JUMPED the fence! He is one spunky 19 year old.

Based on this latest post, I would definitely try the shot. Especially because of the children riding him. You never know when he may decide to act out with your children aboard.
 

Peggy A Barker
Neonate
Username: Peggy72837

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Monday, June 20, 2005 - 11:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi I am back again. I tried the Progesterone. He behavior got worse in two days. I took him off and he got a little better. He does good under saddle but in the pasture he still runs the other geldings. I took him to the vet and he ran some test and sent them to Texas A&M but they found not enough testosterone to measure. I guess this a learned behavior. How do I get him to unlearn it?? Right now I have him hobbled in the pasture to protect the other horses. Sounds mean I know but he is not hurting. Thanks
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.214
Posted on Sunday, June 26, 2005 - 10:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Some other horse or human needs to establish absolute dominance over him. If there is not another horse that can do it, hobbles will not change his attitude, but they will protect the other horses.

I had to separate one horse from the others, and dominate him at every turn. After feeding him, I would run him off of his feed and allow him back when I decided it was time. ( a few minutes) I did this many times during many days. From leading, to standing and moving a foot, I decided what he could do. This is exactly what a lead horse would do to him in a herd situation. It will take time, and everyone that works with him must do the same thing, otherwise it will not work.
 

Karen Bowman
Neonate
Username: Awakenings

Post Number: 1
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Sunday, October 16, 2005 - 08:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi

I have an 11yr old gelding whom I have always suspected of having not been gelded properly. To find out does the vet do a simple blood test for testosterone levels or is it more complex?
 

Anonymous
 
Posted From: 66.211.207.183
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 07:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It is a relatively simple process, but requires drawing blood 2x's, once before an injection and once after. I don't remember what they injected but they had to wait an hour before drawing the 2nd sample. We just had this done on a colt this summer and it will tell if there is a real problem or not.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10333
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 10:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Firstly be aware that geldings can and will breed mares. They just can't get them pregnant. It is not abnormal for a gelding to get an erection and breed - not all do it, but some can.

The test for testosterone levels uses a base line test, and then testosterone production is stimulated (if it's going to be) by treating the animal with hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), then a second sample of blood is tested for an increase in testosterone levels.
 

Deena
Breeding Stock
Username: Morganslil1

Post Number: 184
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Tuesday, October 18, 2005 - 11:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

(Firstly be aware that geldings can and will breed mares. They just can't get them pregnant. It is not abnormal for a gelding to get an erection and breed - not all do it, but some can.) lucky boys huh Jos
 

susan wadlow
Neonate
Username: Bukinest

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 02:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

any ideas how i can stop my gelding mounting the mares
 

Teena Bain
Neonate
Username: Bluejay

Post Number: 10
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I see you are new.. Me too. I am surprised the mares do not teach him a lesson? I have had some gledings that were teasers but did not mount the mare.. I do have a colt that was mounting one of the mares this spring when he was only 3.5 mnths old. Just a little short.. LOL.. Stinker
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1112
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Friday, December 29, 2006 - 08:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If you have a gelding that mounts mares, then it is unlikely that you will be able to stop him. When the mares are in estrus ("heat") and therefore would normally be receptive to a stallion, they will also be receptive to a gelding that mounts.

Be aware that there is significant risk of both injury, and if the gelding is actually achieving intromission, disease transmission.

Some have used Regumate on their geldings with a degree of success in this situation, but it is not universally successful, and it will be expensive.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Neonate
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, February 14, 2007 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Most of what you are dealing with is learned behavior and dominance issues. I would sugest natural horsemanship. Even if it doesn't completely "fix" this horse completely. It will definately help and give you a completly new understanding of your horse.
 

nola roden
Neonate
Username: Nolahorserider

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 21, 2007 - 12:13 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a 2yr 3mo KMSH that was partially gelded earlier this year. The Seller's vet is going to give him the HCG hormone in August and have him re-gelded. Any one have any input on this? I'm petrified that my horse will become wild and unmanageable or something worse. Thanks
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 1380
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Thursday, June 21, 2007 - 11:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If during the gelding process the veterinarian discovered that there was a retained testicle, then it may have been that s/he felt that it was beyond the scope of the current surgery to retrieve it and complete the castration. If the testicle is retained within the inguinal canal, the use of hCG stimulation (which actually increases the testosterone levels in the horse) may achieve the positive result of causing the testicle to descend into a position that will allow a standard castration procedure to be performed. If the testicle does not descend, then a more in depth (quite literally!!) and expensive procedure will be required.

There is no more reason that the animal will become "wild and unmanageable" if he is being handled by people that know how to handle horses than he would without undergoing the various procedures. 2 year-old wild and unmanageable domestic horses are generally created by bad handling, not born that way!



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