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Absorbed follicle?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Hormonal Manipulation » Absorbed follicle? « Previous Next »


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Anonymous
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 10:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi there. This started in breeding problem mares, but I feel it is more appropriate here. Mare is about to be weaned with this years foal. Vet came out to assess for AI rebreed and said she had a non-ovulatory left ovary, multiple small follicles on the right and gave her a shot of prostaglandin last Monday. On Friday she had a 27 mm left follicle. Rechecked on yesterday (1 week after shot) and she had a 31 mm follicle on left. Rechecked again today and he said that she had absorbed the follicle on the left, and that the ovary was once again non-ovulatory. he wants to recheck on Friday to see if she has grown anything on the right, if not he wants to give her another shot of prostaglandin. Does this make sense? can mares actually absorb their follicles like that? I saw it yesterday, and his measurements were correct. I am just confused by this.
Thanks for any help.
 

Jos
Posted From: 158.252.211.210
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 01:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

While follicles can "regress" (the technical term), they usually do it over the course of several days - i.e. decrease slightly in size each day. With a follicle that is large(ish) and then dissapears like the one you are describing, I would personally think it likely that she had ovulated. This would also tie in with your vet's desire to give prostaglandin on Friday, which would be almost 5 days after the ovulation...

Sounds more like a case of CYA to me... :-)
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Tuesday, August 19, 2003 - 01:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

That is pretty much what I thought, and actually what my other "breeding guru" said (she owns the stud I bred to last year). Thanks for the info.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 64.65.233.43
Posted on Friday, August 22, 2003 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

And the plot thickens...
Today the vet said she had an anovulatory follicle on the left (where she had previously absorbed the 31 mm follicle), but she might have the beginnings of a CL, and he didn't want to prostaglandin her today, he is waiting until he rechecks on Tuesday to see what develops. Is this more CYA, as in there is a CL or an anovulatory follicle (both can not exist at once can they?) and so she either ovulated as we thought Monday night, or he missed the anovulatory on Tuesday? What effect will prostaglandin have on an anovulatory follicle? Might she be doing this because we are getting into transitional time? or because she is lactating? She did have a good 35-40 mm follicle softening in late July, but we could not get the semen at that time, so I feel like she is (or was) cycling ok. There is just so much contradicting info from the vet, I don't know what to believe.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Tuesday, August 26, 2003 - 09:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ok, he admitted today that the anovulatory was created when we gave her the shot (I am assuming because it is later in the season and she is 20). How long can the anovulatory hang out. Is there anything we can do to get rid of it?
 

Jos
Posted From: 158.252.217.201
Posted on Tuesday, August 26, 2003 - 01:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Prostaglandin will not cause anovulatory follicles - indeed, it is the treatment to get rid of them (if they will respond to it). See the article on the subject on this web site available by clicking here.

Unless you are missing something in the interpretation, I think it might be time to look for another vet to do your breeding work, as I suspect that although this one may be trying hard, they perhaps do not have as much knowlege as is needed on the subject.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Tuesday, August 26, 2003 - 02:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What he said was that the shot started her on the path to ovulation, but somewhere along the way it went astray, which is why I assumed it had something to do with her age and it gettig later in the season. I also realized as I have been pondering this that she comes in to the barn early (5ish in the evening), and it is a very dark barn, so her body may feel that it is later in the season than it really is. I am going to try to get her out later, manual grazing if necessary to see if that helps. Saturday is basically it for this season. If at that time it doesn't have the appearace that it would respond to Prostaglandin, we will shut her down until Spring.
Thanks again.
 

Anonymous
Posted From: 209.187.120.129
Posted on Thursday, September 04, 2003 - 11:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't know if you follow these stories, but I feel I should share. We gave her one last shot. Anovulatory was still there on Saturday, so we gave her a shot of prostaglandin to see if we could get rid of it. I also decided to let her live outside until we could get her rechecked. I know that horses are seasonal ovulator, due in large part to light exposure. The barn she has been living for the last month, is very dark, and they come in to eat between 5-6 each night. I thought her body might be thinking it was late in the season, so I left her out in the pasture 24/7. Rechecked today with a 34-37 mm follicle on the right, anovulatory has resolved itself, and she just started to show heat signs this morning. I can't say for certain that the light exposure helped, but I feel in this case it probably did not hurt. Here's hoping for successful AI! Thanks for all your help.
 

George Lyster
Posted From: 161.184.26.228
Posted on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 11:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We've tried to breed our mare for a number of years without success. This past year, our vet informed us she again, "reabsorbed" the fetus. What exactly does this mean? Is this preventable? He suggests doing a biopsy next Spring followed by hormone shots.
 

Jos
Posted From: 142.177.103.190
Posted on Saturday, November 22, 2003 - 11:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"Reabsorbing", "absorbing" or "resorption" are all terms used to indicate pregnancy loss during the early pregnancy stage (up to about 35 days). They are actually inaccurate, as there is nothing absorbed (except possibly fluid) by the mare, but in all cases, the pregnancy is in fact lost through the cervix when the mare comes back into heat causing the cervix to relax.

There are a variety of caused of embryonic loss (a more technically correct term), the leading cause being endometritis (inflammation of the endometrium) which can as a result of several problems, although the presence of bacteria in the uterus pre-breeding, or the delayed clearance of post-breeding inflammatory response are probably the two most common. Both of these are preventable and treatable. It is essential to perform an endometrial culture and cytology prior to breeding in order to determine the pathogenic status of the uterus (see here for more information); while post-breeding issues can be treated with oxytocin therapy (see here for information on that.

Note that there is little doubt that there is an overuse of Regumate to "support" pregnancies. While there are certainly instances where it is valuable, there are many other areas where it is (unnecessarily) used to replace good diagnostics. Note also that with the exception of one specific type of micro-encapsulated time-release progesterone, only the daily use of Regumate or progesterone injections has been shown to elevate progesterone levels to the level suggested as being necessary to retain a pregnancy. the use of Depo-provera has been proven not to work, so if it has worked for others reading this in the past, it indicates that you mare was a mare that did not require progesterone supplementation in the first place!!

A solid breeding soundness examination of the mare can be the best money that can be spent in the breeding industry! I think that would be a good move for you.



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