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Worming the pregnant mare

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Pregnant Mare and the Newborn Foal - Volume 1 » Worming the pregnant mare « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Emily
Posted on Wednesday, November 22, 2000 - 06:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is my first experience with breeding. I'm wondering if all worming products are safe for pregnant mares, or not. The month before she was bred I used Quest (moxidectin) and every other month since I've used ivormectin products because I know they are safe. I would, however, like to rotate to something else since I know ivormectin doesn't cover everything.
 

Jos
Posted on Thursday, November 23, 2000 - 05:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There has been some questioning about the use of moxidectin in the pregnant mare, so you may wish to stay away from it while she is pregnant, or until the situation is clarified.

You could try using Pyrantel pamoate (Strongid) - in fact you could double dose with this which will clear her of tapeworm. It's the only dewormer for horses that will currently do that. Tapeworms are not a big problem with horses, but they are being seen more these days, probably as a result of the newer dewormers effectively clearing all other worms and leaving an open field for play.

Do NOT use any organophosphate dewormers in the pregnant mare! Note that the daily dosing form of "Strongid" is different from the Pyrantel pamoate, and I believe it may contain organophosphates.
 

amy
Posted on Thursday, November 23, 2000 - 01:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I hope I read the above message wrong. I use Stongid 2x daily on my pregnant mare. Are you saying that I shouldnt be. I have been using it for the past 3 months and she is due to foal any day now. I also use a perodicial dose of ivermectin to control bots. What adverse effects could it be having on her or her foal?
 

Jos
Posted on Thursday, November 23, 2000 - 08:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The use of organophosphate dewormers after mid-pregnancy is contra-indicated as their use may cause abortion.

I am aware of several instances where organophosphate-related abortion has been linked to the use of a daily dewormer - I am not however aware if that dewormer specifically was Strongid 2X. I would be very interested to hear if the package insert for this product identifies it as being safe for use in pregnant mares, or if conversely it indicates an organophosphate as being part of the ingredients. Perhaps you would be so good as to let me know.

It is unlikely that if you have not had a problem up until now, that you will do so now.
 

amy
Posted on Wednesday, November 29, 2000 - 12:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

strongid c 2x is pyrantel tartrate. it says it can be administered to mares at any stage of pregnancy or lactation. it says the active ingredient is pyrantel tartrate at 2.11%, ingredients are dehydrated alfalfa meal, wheat middlings, cane molasses and preserved proplonic acid. it doesnt mention organophosphate. it says it controls large strongyles(adult), small strongyles(adult & 4th stage larvae), pinworms(adult & 4th stage larvae), ascarids(adult & 4th stage larvae).
 

Celia
Posted From: 151.213.157.235
Posted on Thursday, December 18, 2003 - 01:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, has anyone ever heard of DIATOMACEOUS EARTH (DE). It gets rid of all worms and it is safe for Pregnant mares.
 

S Smith
Posted From: 65.118.224.162
Posted on Thursday, December 18, 2003 - 04:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have definitely heard of DE36 and am trying to find out more about it. I would like to start using it on all of my horses, including pregnant mares. Celia, do you know where more info can be found?
 

Celia
Posted From: 162.39.205.87
Posted on Thursday, December 18, 2003 - 06:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Why yes I do. Here are a few links:
http://www.hydromall.com/happy_grower16.html
http://www.agriorganics.com/products/insect_stop.html
http://www.totalequinesupplement.com/deworming.htm
http://www.de36.com/
http://www.casadelchihuahua.com/diatomaceous_earth_what_is_it.htm
http://www.angelfire.com/biz2/covenants/de.html
http://www.envirogro.ca/earth.htm

Well, I think I sent ya too many links, but I researched them all!!!

Celia
 

Cathy
Posted From: 67.1.1.196
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 03:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have purchased Quest Plus to use to worm my pregnant mares. Jos I see you posted back in Nov. 2000 that there may be a problem using this wormer in late pregnancy. I would appreciate if you could let me know if this is still the case, or if it has proven to be ok. I don't want to use it until I hear from you. Thanks Cathy
 

Jos
Posted From: 165.247.216.18
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 03:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There has been no research supporting the initial concerns, and Quest is labelled for use in pregnant mares. I would therefore now have no concerns about it's use in healthy mares.

There is concern about it's use in foals 4 months or less, but you haven't got there yet!
 

Cathy
Posted From: 67.1.1.196
Posted on Saturday, January 03, 2004 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thankyou for replying so promptly. I know that Fort Dodge has changed labeling on use in foals to read safe for foals 6 months of age and older.
 

Tflaf
Posted From: 152.163.100.13
Posted on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 - 11:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

what about zimecterin or equimax? My mare is about 8 months into her pregnancy. the zimecterin (gold) seems to be a weaker ivermectin/praziquantel combo than the equimax. both wormers say they have not been tested on pregnant mares.
 

Rooty
Posted From: 67.71.19.171
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 11:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If it is not labelled safe for use on pregnant mares then why take the chance when there are safe ones out there?
 

Cathy
Posted From: 63.228.245.23
Posted on Wednesday, January 26, 2005 - 11:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The key is these 2 PRODUCTS have not been tested on preg mares, so they have to state that. Ivermctin has been tested on pregnant mares and is safe to use. Prazaquantel is safe for pregnant mares also, so these two products are made from ingedients that are safe.
 

tflaf
Posted From: 205.188.116.13
Posted on Thursday, January 27, 2005 - 11:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks. The lady at the feed store said she thought they were safe, but I was still questioning the safety when I got home with them. Since our stallion was gelded and therefore this would be his last foal I didn't want to take a chance on losing the foal. Besides the fact that I am really looking forward to this little one.
 

Ursula Euler
Posted From: 198.238.156.2
Posted on Wednesday, March 02, 2005 - 08:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is Panacur safe for a pregnant mare (beginning last month of pregnancy)? I am trying to treat Giardia.
 

Jas (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 216.232.119.10
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 11:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a question about worming my mare. Where I am keeping her the girl decided to talk it upon herself to worm my mare. She will be foaling in the nex day or so and she wormed her without my knowledge 1 week ago. What should I look for? Will it affect the baby? Is this bad?
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.185
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 01:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She should not have treated your mare without your written permission. However, there should be no harm done if she used the proper amount for her body weight. With one week to go, all should be well.
 

Debbie Burnett
Weanling
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 26
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

After checking with my vet, and also at the recommendation of the foaling facility, I had my mare, now 334 days, wormed last week. She was rubbing her tail hair off, which could have been either a symptoms of worms (she was due to be wormed) or a symptom of impending foaling ( which she has shown no signs of).
She has stopped rubbing her rear end against everything now and all seems to be returning to normal. I intend to re-worm her within 12 hours of the foal being born to see if that prevents scours. My vet has also said that this will not do any harm to my mare or her foal, as long as she doesnt foal within the next week or so after worming.

However, you should have a chat with this lady and reinforce that she not treat your mare without your permission. This gives you the opportunity to check with your vet, who knows the mare's history and get a second opinion.
The lady that runs the foaling facility where my mare is has been foaling mares for 25 years, and always contacts me before she does anything ( as she did regarding my mare rubbing her rear end and rubbing off her tail hair and recommending a worming)

Deb
 

Ja (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 216.232.119.10
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 06:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My worry is that she was wormed at the begining of April and she wasnt even due, and she will be foaling pretty quick.

She wont be dealing with my horses any more I moved them last night. I was just worried if there might be some kind of damage to the baby.

Thank you for all your information.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10068
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, May 04, 2005 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Unless an organophospate dewormer (of which there is not currently a commercial version available on the market in North America) was used, or the mare had a heavy worm infestation (and developed colic as a result of massive kill-off), you are extremely unlikely to experience any problems. I never say never, but would be extremely surprised to hear that there were problems related to the deworming.
 

Anonymous
 
Posted From: 209.69.163.117
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2005 - 12:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi, Can you tell me if Anthelcide EQ (oxibendazole) is safe for the pregnant mare?
 

Cathy Hill
Neonate
Username: Smoothmule

Post Number: 3
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2005 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi,
I'm new to the board. I wanted to comment on worming. I use the DE but it will not rid them of everything. There are parasites that do not stay in the digestive tract and the DE will not reach them, it doesn't get into the bloodstream, it kills parasites physically rather than chemicaly. DE is not a poison,in fact it has trace minerals that are very beneficial. It's actually fossil remains of Diatoms and looks like talcum powder. it is mined in the Southwest. The dose is not so much an issue in fact it can be fed free choice, mine like it. It kills tiny pests that consume it and the crystilline (sp)silica in it is very razor sharp, it causes tears in the insides of the pests causing them to dehydrate and die. It won't kill earthworms for some reason but it is great in the garden (where the industrial strength is better). I use it in addition to regular worming (which should be based on your area) It is most important to know that it is sold in 2 forms, industrial (not to be consumed) and food type. It's very safe for animal consumtion. In fact, it's used where they store our grains to kill pests there too. It can be used for any mammal, bird, reptile and can even be sprinkled on the coat to kill lice and other blood suckers. Neat stuff. It also prevents fly eggs from hatching in manure of the treated animals.
Ivermectin is very important in spring and fall as it helps to control bot infestation. It can be used more often but since you should rotate anyway, I just use it spring and fall.
Ivermectin Gold is being investigated for possible problems when used in the long eared equines (donkeys and mules)there have been some deaths reported but it may be dose related as it is with Quest which requres a more accurate weight to safely administer. I've never heard that Strongid would kill tapes. I have my horse stools checked occasionally to see the status of the worms to see if i need to modify my routine. I prefer not to worm for anything if not needed but in my area, Mo, you'll never find them "totally" free of parasites, once you kill them all off, they begin to come back. I just want to keep my horses and mules healthy.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10076
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Monday, May 09, 2005 - 02:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

  • Although Anthelcide EQ does not appear to be labelled specifically for use in pregnant mares, such use is not contraindicated by the FDA, and anecdotal evidence supports safe use in pregnant mares.
  • Strongid T (Pyrantel pamoate) used at a double-dose strength in the equine will control tapeworms.


 

amy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.191.94.48
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 11:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi! I have a mare who is very pregnant. She is due to foal in about 15-17 days hopefully. I was told that I could worm her today, and then ten days from now. Is this true. This will be my first foaling experience so i do need a little help. Any advice is great. Thanks
 

Kay Baxter
Neonate
Username: Kaykay

Post Number: 9
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 01:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i have never had any trouble de worming my pregnant mares but we never ever use quest as it seems to affect miniature horses in a different way from big horses. Also i think panacur is one of the mildest least troublesome de wormers to give. We use it once a year to do the worm purge (panacur double dose every day for 3 days)

There was a study done last year that showed mares that were dewormed within minutes of foaling had foals that never got the foal heat scours. I have a friend who tried it this year and is estatic that her foal never got scoury. I have a mare ready to foal now and i am also going to de worm the mare as soon as she foals. Theory is that worm load is what causes the foal heat scours. Just thought it was interesting and would pass it along :-)
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.196.103.102
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My vet was telling me that they think that foal scours are caused by the foal eating solid food sooner than they really should and that orphans get them too.
 

amy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.191.94.48
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You have to remind me agian...what are foal scours? my vet told me a few months ago but sometimes me memory isnt very good.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10143
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 10:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Unless there has been some new research released about which I am not aware and which differs from the original, the research that indicated a link between a reduction (not elimination) in "foal heat scours" was performed quite a few years ago - maybe 10 now (time flies), and the dewormers that need to be used are Ivermectin or Panacur. Treatment needs to be performed within 12 hours of foaling for optimum results.

Foal heat sours are where the foal's manure becomes looser than normal around 9 days post foaling. At one time it was thought to be associated with the hormonal changes in the mare due to her coming into foal "heat" (estrus). That has now been disproven (the orphan foal in the corner stall that was on milk replacer also developed foal heat scours! :-)), but it is still no completely clear what does cause it. There was speculation that certain strongyle worms were the cause, and they may be in part, but there is a strong belief now that it may simply be a reflection of a slightly upset stomach because the foal is populating its gut with all kinds of new bacteria.
 

Kay Baxter
Nursing Foal
Username: Kaykay

Post Number: 15
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Thursday, June 09, 2005 - 08:22 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

well i figure it cant hurt and it might help so im going to give it a try :-) i will say our last foal born on 04-06-05 had just a tiny amt of scours for one day and i had de wormed his dam 10 days prior to foaling. But that could be a coincedence ??
 

amy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.191.94.48
Posted on Thursday, June 09, 2005 - 09:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for all the help everyone. Does anyone know an estimate for the height for my comming foal? The Dam is a 15.2hh paint and the Sire is a 14.3hh Tennessee walking horse. any estimate would be great. Thanks.
 

amy (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 66.191.94.48
Posted on Thursday, June 09, 2005 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm not sure if my last post got on here. I have a mare who will foal in a few days and i kinda would like an estimate of how tall the baby will end up being. The sire was a 14.3 hh tennessee walking horse. The dam is a 15.2 hh paint horse. Thanks.
 

Pat Wiles
Weanling
Username: Tajsultani

Post Number: 23
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Thursday, June 09, 2005 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Foal size depends on genetics, - not just parents, but grandparents, and so on. Also, environment plays a part in size. I bred 2 Arabs together - both were from normal size stock both stood about 15H (maybe a tiny bit less). The mare's family showed a tendency to sometimes throw small (14-14.2H) The resulting foals were not huge at birth, but they definitely weren't small/average either. Didn't take actual measurements then, but the end result was both now measure somewhere between 15.2 and 16H. Good food, care, etc. helps to promote good growth. Look at the back pedigree for indications of what might happen, but keep in mind breeding is crap shoot, and unexpected things do happen.
 

TX Breeder (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 199.3.209.62
Posted on Friday, June 10, 2005 - 08:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A very general rule of thumb is that the foal will be closest to the size of the mare.
 

Sandy D
Yearling
Username: Sbr_appaloosas

Post Number: 55
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Sunday, June 12, 2005 - 01:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A question on deworming.
I have a maiden mare who was bred this year and she is approx. 30 days in foal. I just noticed this morning that she has a few very small worms in her poop. I have always been told by my vet not to deworm within the first 60 days of pregnancy, but I don't want to wait another 30 days to deworm this mare if she has worms.
Has anyone ever dewormed their pregnant mare within the first 60 days and had a negative outcome?
Is there a dewormer that would be safe to administer to her now?
Thanks



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