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Naughty Foal behaviour

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Pregnant Mare and the Newborn Foal - Volume 1 » Naughty Foal behaviour « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Peggie M
Weanling
Username: Peggie_m

Post Number: 32
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, March 30, 2006 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My colt will be one week old tomorrow. We have been imprinting, he has haltered and we are working on leading. My question is that when I am facing him, he lifts his front leg toward me like he is striking at me in a high pawing motion. I push him back and I have caught and held his leg up as well, but he doesn't seem to be learning from this. Also, when I bend down to check the umbilical, he lifts both front legs like he is going to jump on my back. Any suggestions???? I want to discipline him from doing this and define my space before he is much bigger. Thanks

(Message edited by peggie_m on March 30, 2006)
 

Lisa Weir
Breeding Stock
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 169
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 08:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have found that a sharpish jiggle of the lead rope and a loud NO works well with the young babies. And always have him on the lead when you are working with him, until you are 100% confident that his manners are good.

Holding his leg may turn it into a game for him, so I wouldn't do that anymore.
 

Alex Abel
Yearling
Username: Paintedhorses

Post Number: 86
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 09:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hehe, all my foals are starting to become little devils. Keep on working with them. And never back away from them. That just teaches them that they can scare you. I usualy take a step forward, stomp my foot and yell "no" or "get away" when they are trying to go after me in the pasture. It usualy works. Sometimes I have to just dive out of the way, because these youngsters seem to think that the barn yard is a race track LOL
 

Peggie M
Weanling
Username: Peggie_m

Post Number: 34
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 09:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa and Alex - Thanks so much for your help. I'm realizing I have SO MUCH TO LEARN!!! Have fun with your foals!!!
 

Ashley Beavens
Nursing Foal
Username: Bearcreekfarm

Post Number: 12
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 09:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Peggy
I definitly would not grab his leg when he starts to do that. But if he wants his legs up, try to do stretches with him but make sure you are the one stretching his foot.
If he starts to paw at you then ask him to move, such as moving his neck/head in the opposite direction as you. Turn him in circles so he has to have his legs on the ground, not in the air. You should also never stand infront of your young one for they are sometimes spooky and may want to run or bolt right over you.
 

Alex Abel
Yearling
Username: Paintedhorses

Post Number: 87
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 10:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh yeah....I would not try to do any stretching or grabbing of his leg. He is small now and it might be easy and funny, but just think of a 1200 pound grown horse trying to play with you that way. Foals learn quickly and you might be teaching him something that will come back at you down the road. Just to give you an idea. My hubby taught our dog to run between our legs when he was a puppy. It was cute and funny then. Well our dog still likes to do that but now weighs 80 pounds and he has knocked me over several times already. At least he's not a horse or I would be dead now LOL
 

Mike
Nursing Foal
Username: Mkling

Post Number: 11
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 04, 2006 - 11:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good Ideas here. my little colt is just over a week old now. I've been haltering him every morning and taking it off at night. tommorrow I'm gonna start working with a lead rope a little.
whats a good way to teach a foal not to bite? The other day he started biting a little and now hes really biting at your coat and pants and stuff. it doesnt seem aggressive, but I dont want to have a biter. right now I've been just pushing his head away and saying no. I'll yell more Sternly at him tommorrow and hopefully that will work. any other suggestions?

thanks
 

Peggie M
Weanling
Username: Peggie_m

Post Number: 36
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 06, 2006 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just wanted to let you know that your suggestions are working. I'm making sure I have him on the lead when I'm working with him and he's starting to lead without much resistance .... I still just have to be careful outside when I stomp my foot and say (loudly) "NO", he turns around to leave but does a little buck.... MORE WORK TO DO!!!
Mike, I've been pushing the head away and holding it down and saying "no" when my guy tries to bite or "sucks" on my clothes. If he immediately tries it again, I hold his nose down longer. It seems to be working. He seems to be learning about his AND MY personal space - a little. Just be careful of those feet!! Have fun...
 

Dianne Edwards
Yearling
Username: Mamaedwards

Post Number: 57
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 08:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our colt is 10 days old, he has done the things you are talking about. When he rears we put our hands on his chest and gently push him back down, is that a mistake?
Something else he does that I was wondering about is when we put out hay for his mom he nuzzles it around, paws at it and then walks right up in the middle of it and urinates on it, he does it every time. Is that normal or should we try to make him stop?
Dianne
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 212
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 09:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dianne Chu kash does that with the hay also. But he as well uses it as his bed. I do not know if it is because of a security thing since he was born on straw. He does not like to lay in the shaving if at all possible. I had asked around and they said it is a security/comfort issue.
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 175
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, April 07, 2006 - 10:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My colt urinates in the hay all the time...the fresher, the better :-( . Durn colt.
He DOES love to lay in it too, mostly just his head...laying there..sleeping..occasionally munching.
Those boys are just naughty! But so much fun.
 

Lindros
Nursing Foal
Username: Lindros

Post Number: 13
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

A lot of foals pee in the hay. They will walk to where you put they hay (even if you put it in a different place all the time - I have experimented with this ) and pee! I would love to know why they do that.
Anyone?
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 337
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Maybe it is like the cat syndrome...if you change the litter in their box, it is beyond their ability not to walk over and use it. I had 4 kittens once and they would all line up and take turns every time I changed it. Every cat I have ever had has done it.
 

Daniel Crouse
Weanling
Username: Sneakers17

Post Number: 24
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 08, 2006 - 10:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Don't know if this would work or not, but when you put hay out in the field for the mare put a straw instead where the hay goes and move the hay somewhere else.

Just a suggestion
 

Elena Vieira
Yearling
Username: Opheliaimmorttal

Post Number: 73
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 11:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Everyone,
Does anyone use Clinton ANderson training for foals? I am going to buy it. I watched clips on RDFTV and he has really well behaved foals. Just an option I guess! Good luck!
Elena
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Evie

Post Number: 429
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Elena- we went to one of his seminars last year and we already did many things very similar to his methods, we have put some of his methods into practice and really like the way they work. Good luck, Ev
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 218
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Elena- I too have that dvd from Clinton Anderson and really enjoy his method of training. It does work on your foals!
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 373
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 03:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I need some input from the group - Catcher is 12 days old and just like her Momma, she loves to have her rear end scratched (lucky me). She will actually walk up to me backwards, just like her Momma. My question is that when I am brushing her or scratching her in the area, she turns around and wants to nibble on my leg, waist or whatever she can reach. She has no aggression. I tell her no and push her head away, if she doesn't stop I will pop her nose with my hand. My question is this - Is she just treating me like a horse? This behavior reminds me of two horses nibbling on each others backs in the pasture. Does anyone have any ideas to stop it? I love to brush her...I just don't want to be groomed back!
 

Megan A Brown
Nursing Foal
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 14
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 04:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Have someone come out with you to babysit her front end while you're brushing her. I think she's just trying to return the favor, but I agree that she needs to learn people don't appricate getting nibbled on. My yearling filly has always had a busy mouth so she got some fairly early tying Lesons to keep her head out of range. Also I've found with her that if I give her something else to play with, she leaves me alone. For example sometimes I let her "hold" the brush I'm not using or my old hat. It keeps her mouth entertained and I'm planing to teach her to pick things up that I drop ridding. She will follow me around the pasture packing things for me, like her brother's lead rope. It does however predispose her to picking up anything on the fence she's tied to. I left her tied by the saddel racks one day and she had every single Pad we own of the floor in under 10 minutes. If your are willing to deal with the consequencesof having a baby trick horse, I'd recommend giving her something to hold.
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 374
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 04:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, I will give that a try. I hate to discipline her when I think she is trying to be sweet...misguided as it may be. I just don't want a biter.

When did you start tying her?
 

Terry O.
Yearling
Username: Ksfarmer

Post Number: 51
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have the same thing happen with my colts. When I scratch them and they try to return the favor I just stop scratching them. When they stop I start scratching them again. In about ten to fifteen tries they get the idea and they start to scratch themselves or they wriggle their nose in the air and nobody gets hurt.
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 238
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 05:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, Chu kash does the same thing when I am scratching him. It is just normal horse behaviour. If you do not want her to be nibbling on you when she tries just jiggle what it is and have it bump into her nose. Clinton Anderson talked about that on his dvd. Also with Chu kash I try to only scratch him when he is near Lady and he can nibble on her.
 

Megan A Brown
Nursing Foal
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 17
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 05:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

She was about a month old, and pretty good at the whole leading idea. At first it was just standing next to mama with the lead rope looped over the fence, and only for short periods of time. If you have a railing that you can run the lead rope through and a long enough lead rope that you can wok on the colt and keep the lead rope in you hands or tucked into your belt, you can have alot of control over what they do with their head, with out putting alot of pressure on them. I start them out fairly close to the fence so if they decide to pull back I have a lot of rope to work with. If they start to pull back I let them have a few feet os slack then gently start pulling them back toward the fence. They learn that throwing a fit doesn't keep them from being tied up, and that the further awyay they get from the fence the more pressure the get on their heads, but all in a verry controled incremental way. The other nice thing about this set up is it lets you pull their heads back around if they start nibbling on you with out moving or changing what your doing. I have one mare that throws really pretty colts, but they tend to be nervous biters. If they don't like haveing their feet messed with the'll try to scare you buy biteing. With the led rope runnig over the rail like a pully I can have a hold of their head and still work on their feet.
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 376
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 09:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is why I love this board..thank you Terry, Lori and Megan for all the help!
 

Terri Berwanger
Yearling
Username: Terrib

Post Number: 97
Registered: 10-2005
Posted on Friday, April 14, 2006 - 01:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just thought I'd add my little tidbit on naughty foal behavoir. My warmblood filly born a month ago is a little bull, but at the same time so friendly and adoring. Sometimes I don't know if she thinks she's human or that we are foals. Anyhow, went out to catch her and mom yesterday and I was telling my husband not to walk the other mare off until I got Stella(mare). I actually didn't get those words out as I was suddenly struck upon the head by my evil little filly as she reared up on top of me, knocking me to the ground. All I could do was yell at my husband. Blimey, this filly is something else. She also loves her butt scratches as well, just like all the mares babies. There is no badness in her, just loads of play. Won't turn my back on her anymore and she was a little lady coming in this evening.
Terri
 

Joanna
Breeding Stock
Username: Joanna

Post Number: 126
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, April 14, 2006 - 01:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I know I am coming in to this discusion a little late, but I wanted to add somthing. A horse will pee in a pile of hay (or straw) because they don't like for it to splash on thier legs. I asked my vet about this, and he says that a lot of horses don't figure this out, but once they do it is almost impossible to make them stop. I had one gelding that did this all the time, and within a month of him being in the pasture with my other geldings, they were all peeing in the hay! Quite a thing to see, thirteen geldings all going at the same time in the brand new hay pile!
 

Elena Vieira
Yearling
Username: Opheliaimmorttal

Post Number: 77
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Saturday, April 15, 2006 - 04:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lol. Joanna thats weird. My pregnant mare will pee in her hay if its on the ground. I dont think she purposely does it but it just seems like she doesn't care. Who knows!
Thanks everyone who wrote about Clinton Anderson. I am going to buy the DVD asap...even though i STILL dont have a foal. (i am at 339)
Well good luck w. everyones foals!
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 265
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 06:18 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You want to talk about naughty foal behaviour...WELL.....last night my trainer friends stopped by to see Chu kash. Boy, WHAT AN EMBASSESSING MOMENT THAT WAS !!!!!!!! He has decided that every stranger in the hallway was going to eat him alive!!! He was fine in his stall until I lead him to the doorway, one look at the people and he turned into the wildest colt there could be. Even had to return to the bum rope. That did not help. They got to see a 6wk old colt go from a quiet boy to a bucking, rearing, screaming fella. Finally got him out of his stall and into the hallway (not like this is out of the ordinary, we walk out of the stall two, three times a day with the boarders around). Once he was in the hallway his eyes were so wide and scared. Took him into the arena and he still was panicing. Did a bit better but was no where near the quiet colt that I have that I can dress up. You would have thought he has never in his life ever seen a human being before! With much trouble of getting to put him back into his stall then he was fine. Once in his stall he came to the side to see everyone. Any suggestions on how to get this good boy to accept strangers in the hallway without it being such a bad experiance for him?????? I know to have lots of people over and there has been to see him. Just everyone has been on the otherside of the stall wall. He will come up to them and be as friendly as can be. I must admit they did like the looks of him and that yes he is big for only being 6 wks old. He is bigger than a lot of weanlings at the shows.
Any answers too this?????
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 182
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 11:36 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Did you tell Chu Kash not to talk to strangers????? Poor lil man, getting scared for no reason :-).
At first, it may be in your best safety to introduce new people in the stall when he's with Lady where he feels safe....his safe zone. Halter him and allow one person to approach him at a time. Much like dogs, it's better to not "console" him too much when he's being goofy because he may associate his negative behavior with praise. So, reinforce what he knows (whoa, lead forward, etc.) and praise him when he relaxes. Really poor on the love when he allows others to approach and touch him. If he acts up (kicks out, tries to run off, etc) get him to whoa and stand still (tell him NO! if kicks/paws out)...and then start touching him, allow others to touch him. When he does this ok in the stall, then take him into the isleway and start over. Little steps are good so as to not overwhelm him...and not create bad habits. Set him up for success vs. failure and he will learn that all is good.
I absolutley love the foals/babies the most and enjoy working with them over the adult horses. However, there is little else more unpredictable than a young horse. They learn and absorb information like a sponge, but react fast and can be dangerous simply because they don't know much.
I once got pawed in the face and collar bone by an upset weanling years ago that threw a temper tantrum.
My foal Buddy is as quiet as they get, but had a blow up yesterday. I had given him a shower after bringing them in the evening. Mare was in the stall across from us (had buddy in the wash stall). I was walking him up/down the isleway after his shower (which he does not like), and the mare started hollering for him. He got all bent out of shape...reared/pawed/wheeled around. It took a moment for me to get a real hold onto him. Had to make him stop, settle. Once he quit, we proceeded back to the stall...but not until he acted like a gentleman.
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 266
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 02:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Heather, beleive me I do not console them when they get like this. That is one thing I have learned from the dogs and training them.There is no foo foo gushyness with them when they get like this. It is more of a knock it off and lets go attitude that I will give them. Be strong and nothing is going to hurt you type deal. Once he relaxed for a second or so he did get his scratch. But when he went goofy again he was put back in his place. The only spot where he did his bucking,rearing ,squeeling was in his stall. No one else was near him but me. Everyone else was out in the hallway. Like I said up until then he would greet everyone while he was in his stall. Normally very friendly. No real trouble up until last night. Thanks for the advice and I suppose I am going to have to have strangers come in to see him all the time.
Lady must have warned him about stranger danger !! Because it sure was not me!
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 183
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, Lori, these boys are going to keep us on our toes! I wonder what his dish was about getting upset? Maybe (I'm willing to bet) just a one time wonder...
I also bet Chu Kash looked HUGE bucking/squeeling in his stall!! It's like the stall shrinks for a moment or so.
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 268
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Heather, OOOHHHH YYYYAAAAHHHHH!!!!!! I must say he TRUELY fit his name!! It is a 12x14 stall and it just seemed like a 6x7 when he was doing that. . I really hope it is a one time deal or we are going to have to do some socializing with this boy!
Maybe just maybe it had something to do with the full moon the other day.....side effect??? I'll stick to that one, don't know about you but I am!
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 238
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 03:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lori, he is a little boy and that is very common for some colts, and they say woman are hormonal....who ever said that never raised horses....the little boys just seem to go up and down like that, but rest assured they do grow out of it.....and a good gelding is worth its weight in gold as a mount!!!! Of course the fillies as they mature can go through some crazy hormonal influences which may push one to the edge too. I would not worry about it, he is a little boy and they do test the limits...be gentle but firm and you will be alright and he will turn out fine...the only thing predictable about a foal is it's unpredictability. :-)
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 269
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 16, 2006 - 06:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Heather and Jan, I think it must have been something on those lines he was wound up today out in the field. None stop laps around an arce and half field, jumping all over Lady also. One time he even had his front hooves on Lady's back. Boy... does she have the patience with him! I guess I just have to remember Jan, what you told me about Chu kash and his name.
Thanks again gals till next month when he decides to go hormonal!
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 570
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, April 17, 2006 - 07:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lori,
AS well, the babies go through those "trust" stages" and "anti trust stages" . Scared to death of something that has been a everyday thing. Its natures way of protecting them. Just keep up the good work and he will be ok.
Kim
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 242
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, April 17, 2006 - 08:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

DITTO what Kim said, they do go through stages great one day, nuts the next, but you get one of those great days and you forget about any of the bad days. Keep up the good work, you may not see the progress you have made with him right now, but just wait....you will see it in time and will be glad you started training him early when he is 8 months old and 600 pounds :-)
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 273
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, April 17, 2006 - 09:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kim K and Jan, Thanks for the advice!
As long as I know this is something normal and too expect it. Then I can deal with it when he decides to hit this stage. I guess I did want an independant horse :-) Today he is back to his normal self. Thanks again till the next time he decides to have a fit!
 

Jan H
Breeding Stock
Username: Jan_h

Post Number: 246
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, April 17, 2006 - 03:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

think of it as the horsey equivelent to the terrible twos....it happens but its not forever! ((((((Hugs)))))))))
 

Lori aka " Raven"
Breeding Stock
Username: Raven

Post Number: 277
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, April 17, 2006 - 04:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)



THANKS !
 

Elena Vieira
Yearling
Username: Opheliaimmorttal

Post Number: 90
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Friday, April 21, 2006 - 12:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi!
I was wondering when your colts became "boys". My colt is four days old and as sweet as can be and I don't want that to change! I've been working with him with as many things as I can think of. A tarp, plastic bag, halter, rope, brush, baby blankey, I've layed down with him etc. I don't know when to start teaching him to lead. I am waiting until he's comfy with the halter. I also pick up his feet a little bit. I am going to start Clinton Anderson with him ASAP. What does everyone think? What did ya'll do with your babies?
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 236
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 17, 2006 - 10:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello,
My one day of mini filly is bucking and kicking when we try to get close to her. We imprinted her at birth. I don't want to hurt her, but I don't want her to hurt someone else either. You can see her at
http://s42.photobucket.com/albums/e329/MBhorses/MBCricket2006fillymini/
My children want to pet her, but she is not letting us. I have to hold her just to treat her cord.
thanks MELISSA
 

Barbara J. Seyfert
Neonate
Username: Seyfertb

Post Number: 1
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 17, 2006 - 02:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a new colt that is a little over a week old. He didn't have a real good start in life. He didn't get enough colostrum, and had to have a transfusion as well as lots of medicines everyday. The night he was born, I touched him all over, petted him etc. The next day is when I found out that he didn't have enough colostrum and the nightmare began. Now since we had to give him medicine so many times everyday (sometimes 4 times a day) he doesn't want to have anything to do with us. If you want to touch him or halter him or anything at all you have to have two people to catch him. Any suggestions as to what I can do to have this little guy like me again and trust me again? I have had one other foal in the past and this is completely different from the first foal. Also, this colt's mom was a maiden mare and she is not much of a mother. Don't get me wrong, she loves him to death, but she doesn't discipline him at all, and he calls all the shots. What can I do?
 

Ruth
Neonate
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 6
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Monday, July 31, 2006 - 03:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have just been through this with our filly. Her navel got infected so for the first week of her life she had a needle jabbed into her every 12 hours. Not fun, and I had no help. I am lucky with her that she does seem to be fairly tractable and friendly by nature. What I did initially was to make a point of going in the stall, cornering her and scratching her until she realized I wasn't hurting her quite a few times a day, so that it wasn't every time I came in the stall that I was doing something unpleasant. Once she was done the needles we were making good headway, especially when the scours happened as I find they do love it when you clean up their poor little bums, until she developed ulcers - then she had to have a catheter in, bloodwork, etc., plus cimetidine orally every 8 hours for a month. I don't know if your colt is getting oral medication, but this is what really turned my girl around. Once we got over the haltering fear and she calmed down enough she realized that I was putting yummy corn syrup (I mixed the cimetidine tablets with corn syrup)in her mouth, well, now I am her best friend. She has been off the cimetidine for 3 weeks now and still opens her mouth wide for it every time I put my hand under her chin.
 

melissa
Breeding Stock
Username: Mbgirl

Post Number: 289
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, August 10, 2006 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello,
My 3 mos old fillies are bad about running at you when you get really to leave them. The fillies are great while you are giving them some petting or whatever, but when you walk away they want to run and try to reck up on you. My stud colt last year didn't do this. I was wanting to know what I can do. They are both very sweet and was imprinted at birth, but have this problem about us walking away. The paint filly also trying to bite sometimes. We have been working with the paint filly Amber on leading, somedays she does great other days she acts up.
thanks you all for your help with this.SEE them on www.photobucket.com/albums/e329/MBhorses/MBCricket2006fillymini
www.photobucket.com/albums/e329/MBhorses/MBAnnie2006filly
melissa



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