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Feeding pregnant mares

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Pregnant Mare and the Newborn Foal - Volume 1 » Feeding pregnant mares « Previous Next »

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nonenonenoneVaccinationsDonnaJ01-12-06  08:58 pm
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Kelly (209.226.106.84)
Posted on Saturday, July 27, 2002 - 07:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hi everyone,
just was wondering how you feed your pregnant mares?
when should you increase ration?
my mare was bred 1week ago, and waiting for 15day vet check to confirm in foal.
this is my first time with breeding.. so I will have lots of questions in the future :)
right now she is on pasture/ and timothy/alfalfa mix hay.(our pasture is pretty much dried up from lack of rain)
if she is, in fact, in foal, how much should I feed her, (winter time she gets oats and vitamin supplement)
thanks in advance
 

ELizabeth Hardy (12.38.198.125)
Posted on Tuesday, July 30, 2002 - 09:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kelly You need to put her on a good vitamin supplement now. Mare Plus comes to my mind.
And she will need more than just hay during the her pregnancy.

My Mare had always had grain in her diet Omelene 100 2 1/2 lbs twice a day with 2 flaks of hay.
( she did well on that during the summer and we usually increased it by 1/4lb in the winter months.) ALong with this she was supplemented with Vita plus and Farriers secret.

When She got pregnant we stuck to the above routine for the first 2 months and then added 2 scoops of rice bran to the above. and stopped the Farriers secret( She did not need it). She was also give some alfalfa

at about 3months preg her grain was increased to 2 3/4 lbs.

At 4months she was switched to Omelene 200 ( increased protien) which we cut with rolled oats to reduce the sugar content ( she had stopped drinking water and was only willing to take sugar water so we had to cut some of her sugar out of her diet.) So she got 1 3/4lbs of Omelene 200
1lb Rolled oats 1 scoop of rice bran and 1/4 flak of alfalfa and coastal hay 2 flks twice a day

By 6 months We increased the Omelene 200 to 2lbs-
her rations were as follows: 2lbs of omelene, 1lb rolled oats, 1 -2 scoops of bran, 2 cups of alfalfa pellets and 2-3 flaks of coastal hay ... fed twice daily.

And by the end of this month she will be switched over to Omelene 300 for which she will remain on til the foal is weaned.. if I need to increase the protien more I will decrease the oats and increase the Omelene.

She is gaining wght appropriately and not too fat. I will also be starting her on Mare Plus.

She is wormed every 2months either with Strongid past or Imverectin( SP?) alternatitively.

Check with your vet on how and when to start adding grain to her diet and what grain to use..

My Mare was 950lbs-1000lb and 15'2 before she became pregnant. She really did not start looking pregnant til she was about 7 months along.. but each mare is different and carries the foal differently depending on how she is built.

Omelene is a sweatfeed made by Purina the comes in varied % of protien.

Also make sure her teeth are floated.

You can email me at hrsefantc@aol.com
 

AMR (207.177.53.99)
Posted on Tuesday, July 30, 2002 - 02:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our mares stay on pasture for the summer and early fall. We are also about out of grass from lack of rain. Come fall I start pitching hay daily morning and night. They get alfalfa and grass, enough grass that they have plenty to consume but not so much they are wasting it. I do not grain except for an older mare that has a hard time with her weight. When it gets colder and the snow falls I increase the grass hay. As long as you are feeding a good quality hay and the mares are not old or thin they will be fine. I also keep a mineral suplement and salt out for the mares free choice. I have been told by many vets that the extra grain is not a good idea, just keep the hay in front of them. It is not good for the mares to be getting large amounts of grain. Our foals are allways born healthy and grow well out on grass, no grain is given to them either until they are weaned.
 

Kelly (209.226.247.152)
Posted on Wednesday, July 31, 2002 - 04:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

yes, I worry about giving her grain right now, because she is a tad bit overweight, not obese, but she seems to be a very easy keeper.
she is 15 yrs old and as far as I know this will be her 3rd foal.
I will ask my vet when he comes to U/S what and when I should supplement.
Also, she is very close to my gelding, when I ride him away from the property, she has a hissy fit, running back and forth along the fence line
should I worry about this? if she is in foal? will it cause her to lose it?

thanks so much for your responses
this will be my first foal, so I am a little excited, and hopefully she will get in foal.


Kelly
 

ELizabeth Hardy (12.38.198.125)
Posted on Wednesday, July 31, 2002 - 07:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kelly if she is an easy keeper then she might do very well on just good grass and good quality of hay for awhile... The key is just to be observant.

Every mare is different and you will get as many different responses to "what to feed a pregnant mare" and while they may all be different that does not mean that they are not necessairly wrong.

It really depends on the age of the mare, her current wght/is she an easy/ hard keeper , the area of the country you live in and the feed/hay available to you in that area.

I am not able to keep my mare on pasture alone with just hay.. first the pasture is not great even when it is not burned out; second the quality of hay varies.. I board my mare and the barn manager will not touch alfafa hay because of the blister beetle problem so he uses coastal hay which is not of bad qualtiy it is just not very high in protien.


As for you mare running the fence lines unless she is a proven high risk for abortion I would not think that it would be a problem for her.
Does she get so frantic that there would be a danger of her running through the fence? Has she ever run through the fence? If she is getting really sweaty and worked up can you put her up in a stall while you ride your gelding?
(Once she foals you may need to seperate her from the gelding too)

My mare is 9 months ( this is her first preg) and I recently let her out in the arena while I was cleaning her stall.. she proceeded to run at full gallop and buck and kick up her heals.. it looked kind of funny seeing this very pregnant mare do this...

Because of the Texas heat I have virtually eliminated any formal exercise at this time. but she is turned out to pasture for 8-10 hours at night.
 

Kelly (64.228.11.74)
Posted on Wednesday, July 31, 2002 - 11:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

my mare is basically outside 24/7.
we live in sw ontario, and it has been a terribly hot dry summer. so we have been feeding timothy/alfalfa for about 4 weeks now. I do have some 2nd cut alfalfa which I think I will save until I know she is pregnant, and maybe later on in her pregnancy? would you recommend that?
or alfalfa through the whole pregnancy?

she wouldnt run into the fence, but she does get all sweaty and worked up.and gets quite a work out from the running. but I think she would get more sweaty and worked up in her stall. since she cannot see him, I will try to separate them once it cools down some (I only have one run in shed and the hot sun is unbearable to have one of them separated into the sunny pasture in the full heat of the day)
I have separated them in the past. and they both carry on runnnin the fence line. but no one gets hurt. and they will eventually get over the separation thing. but not completely I dont think.
she is 15 and he is 13 and I gather they have been like this all of their lives.

take care now,
thanks again
Kelly
 

ELizabeth Hardy (12.38.198.125)
Posted on Thursday, August 01, 2002 - 10:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kelly
Once she is confirmed pregnant she will have to have a good source of protien either grain or alfalfa or combination of both. It depends on the mare and your vet's recommendations. As both of you are closer to this mare than anyone on this board.. ie you can see her day to day ;you and the vet will be better able to determine what really works. Since she is not used to a lot of grain;I would tend to want to keep her on the alfalfa,-you can supplement the alfalfa with free choice coastal or timothy during the day if the grass is completely gone. ( we put round bales in the pasture.) you do not want to feed alfalfa free choice as it is like giving them too much grain.

Alot of people do not realize how rich alfalfa is and that it is an excellant source of protien. It is also much closer to the horse natural diet of grass... which makes it an ideal feed.. ( if you have a blister bettle free source.)

As I said before each mare is different. Her protien needs and nutrient needs will rise as the pregnancy progresses. If she is an easy keeper you may have to be more carefull to avoid over feeding her.

In that this is not her first foal can you contact the owners who had her previously to see if she had any problems during her pregnancies and deliveries? What did they feed her? How much?

Also in that she is 15 have the vet check her teeth to make sure she has not dental problems. If she need tranquilization to float her teeth the vet may decide to hold off on it comepletely.. the less drugs she is exposed to the better.

Keep up with her vaccinations on her normal schedule.

She will need Pnuemoabort (make sure it is for preg mares) at 5months 7 months and 9 months
She will then need to have her yearly vaccinations repeated 30 days prior to delivery.

Have you vaccinated for WNV ? has it reached your area yet? If not does the vet think it will be a problem next year? Do you have problems with mosquitoes.. if you do you will eventually have to deal with WNV. The WNV vaccine has not ben proven safe or unsafe with pregnant mares. Most vets recommend giving it to pregnant mares only if the risk of exposure is high... ie you have a problem with mosquitoes and/ or it has already been found in the bird population. WNV is given followed by a booster at 3 weeks and then again in six months if your in a high risk area. then yearly ... if your in a high risk area or the mare is a show mare WNV vaccine is recommended every six months instead of yearly. There is a nice article on vaccinations I think in Western Horseman.. which suggests that if you show or have a high turnover in your stable some of the yearly vaccinations need to be given every six months.

Keep her on a good worming schedule.. If you use Quest.. you will need to worm with something else.
make sure the wormer you do use is safe for pregnant mares.. Safeguard and Ivermectin come to mind. She should also be wormed about 30 days before she delivers to reduce the worm load in the foal.

As for the problems with her getting all worked up. If she gets really bad could you pony her from the gelding and take her with you? Assuming you are not doing long strenuous rides with the gelding or jumping? Most mares even though pregnant will benfit from light exercise throughout their pregnancy. You can discuss this with your vet.

As the pregnancy progresses you might also notice that she will lay down more fregquently " to get the load off her feet" esp as she gets heavier.


Good luck Kelly and I apologize for the length of this .. it did get kind of long

liz
 

Anne Tursky (162.39.155.144)
Posted on Friday, September 27, 2002 - 03:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello,
I was wondering if there is any contraindication to supplementing my pregnant mare's feed with Weight Builder (high fat) supplement? She's 16 y/o TB who is an addicted cribber. She lost alot of weight several years ago with her other foal - so I really want to stay ahead of her this time. The phosphorus/calcium ratio of Alfalfa and the discussions of high protein in OCD have made me hesitant to increase her caloric intake using those routes. Does anyone have any experience with this situation? Weight Builder's nutrition information states that it is 40% fat and has calcium added. Thanks for any input!
 

Tracy (67.250.184.115)
Posted on Monday, September 30, 2002 - 01:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Do any of you guys have access to LMF feeds? I know it's not available every where yet but I just love it. My mare was on the Super Supplement through her whole pregnancy (it's a pellet form of grain with every vitamin and mineral you need) and then given 4 lbs of rolled oats near the end when needed. She was also on pasture year round during the day and given grass hay morning and night. This is a mare that is very hard to keep weight on and she did great with this.
 

dianne allpike
Posted on Wednesday, March 12, 2003 - 12:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi
I found with my last foal that she was much better put together than the previous two - from the same mare. I had the dam on feed with all the dietary requirements until the last two months when she had only lucerne and hay. By doing this the foal had plenty of room to grow, hence she was born with beautiful straight legs and a solid body. She is the most gorgeous creature I've seen still - she is now ready to breed at six years of age.
 

Paul Tilley (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.51.231
Posted on Wednesday, August 03, 2005 - 04:09 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi I have read your information with interest and I must say some of it looks a bit complicated.I live in Ireland and have a t.b. 15yr old 16.2 mare. She has been covered and we are waiting to see if she is pregnant. We have plenty of grass but she deosnt seem to want to eat much of it, she hangs around the stable seeming to want her suppliment food called "cool n easy". Is it usual for them to act differently if they are pregnant? Do i feed her more suppliment if she seems to want it and not worry about the grass?. Any info will be useful as this is my first time as well.
 

teb (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 194.125.182.134
Posted on Thursday, August 04, 2005 - 05:43 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Paul,
I'm in Ireland too. Cool n easy is from gain and it's a 10 percent mix basically for ponies and liesure horses. If she's out 24/7 like our mares try and find someone in your area that stocks Baileys feeds.(you can email for a list) Anyway they have a lick bucket called paddock lick plus. This has all the vitamins and minerals she needs without high levels of sugar which she doesn't need with all the sugar in our good irish grass. Keep her on the grass. If she's pregnant then in the dreary rainy winter months you can start adding some hard feed to her ration. I have 3 mares out 24/7 and I don't have tons of acerage, but we manage well and they have access to the licks and I give them some grow n win too. Who is your mare by and what have you bred too?
Terri in Meath!
 

Debbie Burnett
Yearling
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 97
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 04, 2005 - 11:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mares are kept at a boarding facility for the time being while we are waiting to complete the paperwork for an 8 stall horse barn. The owner is feeding 2cups sweetfeed, 2cups hay replacementand 2 cups highfat high fibre, all purina brand, plus a flake of hay, twice per day. THe horses are out on pasture during the day with access to limited amount of grass as the weather gets hotter and the grass gets eaten down. Everyone I tell this too tells me this is way too much grain for horses that are basically doing nothing all day. One of these mares is pregnant and the other didnt catch this year so I am waiting for next year.

My question is..... is 6 cups of grain twice daily too much? Farrier says this could make the mares founder and cause all kinds of hoof and leg problems, others say its ok... any opinions?

Deb
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.196.103.102
Posted on Thursday, August 04, 2005 - 02:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Which Purina sweetfeed? There are quite a few, ranging from 12% to 18%
That doesn't sound like much to me, especially for horses that aren't getting a lot of hay, although if the pasture is good that makes up for that.
We have one TB broodmare at our place that is on free choice hay and gets 11 cups of Phase 2 twice per day! She does nothing all day, and isn't nursing either! She is by no means fat, in fact if anything she could use another 20-40 lbs on her. She does fall into the hard keeper category, but you can see why I don't think your mare is overfed. However you have to feed the individual, I have other horses who I'm sure would founder on that amount, to say nothing of not being able to get through the door. If your horse looks overweight ask to have her cut back, but it's not necessarily a matter of the work they do or don't do.
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.196.103.102
Posted on Thursday, August 04, 2005 - 02:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just adding that we have another mare on the opposite end of the spectrum, who is nursing a foal and only gets a handful of grain plus a vitamin supplement.
 

Debbie Burnett
Yearling
Username: Horselady

Post Number: 98
Registered: 03-2005
Posted on Thursday, August 04, 2005 - 04:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mares are paints, not hard keepers at all. I must say they look outstanding, not fat and certainly no ribs showing :-)

I spoke to the Purina supplier in my area and she tells me for the foals, general rule is 1cup per month of age of foal per day. For broodmares, 5-6 lbs of grain per day for easykeepers, and 6-10 for the TB that are known to be hardkeepers. She also adds free choice hay and a mineral product.
I am taking over a sample for her to see as what I described to her on the phone she doesnt sell anything that fits that description. I think my boarding facility may be getting feed from more than one supplier, but ill know soon enough.
Thanks for the input Rooty. Funny how different opinions vary so much.

Deb.
 

Paul Tilley (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 159.134.51.66
Posted on Thursday, August 04, 2005 - 05:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello Terri in Meath
Thanks for your reply great to hear from you and thanks for the information. I will send for the Baileys List. My mare is out of Pontside by Meneval (USA)and she has been covered by Soveriegn Water.from Bonmahon. Ilive near Lismore Co Waterford. What I realy wanted to know, is it usual for the mare to act differently (ie not want grass but more of the Cool n Easy) if she is pregnant.

Paul
 

teb (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 194.125.180.123
Posted on Friday, August 05, 2005 - 12:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Paul,
When I first turn my mares out for the summer 24/7 I notice them standing around at the gate looking to come in to their home comforts especially in bad weather. When they are by themselves they have a tendency to want to be in more. Have you had this mare long? It's possible that she is use to being in and in that case it's just going to take her awhile to adjust. But she needs to be out getting fresh air and exercise and not getting just hard grain. If you had company it would probably make it easier for her. If you get a lick for her then she might be content also. In bad weather my mares also get turnout rugs. Just a med 200grm rug to keep the worst of the rain away. Most people don't approve of rugs for mares, but I try to give them every luxury they can have.Also the rug is only for turnout and they have lovely big straw beds to come into. That's why I use a lighter rug. I just like to keep the worst of the weather off them. Believe you me she should eat the grass if your not giving in to her by feeding her every time she wants food. That's how they start training us!
Terri
 

Emma
Neonate
Username: Emma

Post Number: 1
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Monday, September 19, 2005 - 06:31 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I just wanted to point out that if your mare is not normally fed grain and keeps well on grass and hay then there is no need to feed her any differently till the last 3 months of her pregnancy, up untill this time the foal does not put any extra strain on the mare. In the last 3 months of pregnancy the foal does most of it's growing and this is when the mare needs the extra feed. All my mares are kept on pasture and top quality oaten hay and have access to a mineral lick right up until the last trimester, then i add to their diet lucern chaff, a product called equi jewel, barley and a small amount of pollard. All my foals are born big, healthy and correct. My point is that to feed extra to your mare before this point (last trimester)is only a waste of money and you may make her overweight in which case she could have trouble foaling. please note that you should gradually start feeding your mare extra and not just change her diet over night.
 

Saddlesore (Unregistered Guest)
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Posted From: 68.95.118.113
Posted on Monday, January 02, 2006 - 08:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare is 5 months pregnant and had to take her to equine hospital. We weren't sure if she was colic or if she was trying to abort. They are running more test now. She was dehyderated and has low magnesium level and has the shakes real bad. This is my first baby since I've had her. She is 15 in 2006. The previous owner said she had foaled before, but not sure about the aborts. The Dr.'s at the equine hospital said she is not aborting and that baby is fine. I'm so worried about my horse!! She has not coliced on me since I've had her and that has been 4 yrs now!! I'm in tears and worried SICK.
 

Deena
Breeding Stock
Username: Morganslil1

Post Number: 196
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Monday, January 02, 2006 - 08:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saddlesore im so sorry your mare isnt feeling well.I hope all goes well for you mare and her baby.
 

Gynna Meiller
Yearling
Username: Jw_kings_excalibur

Post Number: 54
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Tuesday, January 03, 2006 - 02:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am sorry to hear about your mare and hope all is going better. The weather has been so very weired that many horses are not drinking water like they need to. I have found that adding just 2 to 3 oz of apple cider vinagar to their feed once a day helps tremendously to increase their water intake and its just plain good for them. Make sure she gets lots of hay too. Keep us posted hun..
 

saddlesore (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.95.118.113
Posted on Thursday, January 05, 2006 - 06:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you Ladies! She is doing better, but they are now looking at head trauma or a tumor in the brain. The test is very expensive to do a brain scan and seriously considering it. They have her on valium and other meds and she is doing better. They say she might come home soon and that makes me worry again. I guess more reason to do brain scan. So many things to worry with, gosh!!
 

Kim Winter
Yearling
Username: Clafairy

Post Number: 76
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Friday, January 06, 2006 - 11:54 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh that must be very scary for you - I hope that they can get her well soon and send her home better so that you can stop worrying. keep us updated.
 

saddlsore (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 68.95.118.113
Posted on Sunday, January 08, 2006 - 09:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, It doesn't look like my mare will be coming home soon or at all. She is having a bad time and I'm limited on money. She is having seziers and not safe to come home. Steriods have limited them some, but high doses for to long care harm both her and baby. $1500 for a CT Scan. If we can get her stable at a resonable dose then we could get though this, but the Vet says that it don't look good. Thanks for all the support.
 

Gynna Meiller
Yearling
Username: Jw_kings_excalibur

Post Number: 67
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Sunday, January 08, 2006 - 11:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am so very sorry! I wish things could have been different for you guys. Its horrible to have to go through this..I will keep you and the horses in my prayers..
 

Kathee McGuire
Neonate
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 8
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Monday, January 09, 2006 - 05:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saddlesore - I can not imagine the agony you are experiencing. I will also keep you in my prayers as I am sure a lot of other readers will.
 

saddlesore (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 70.247.208.26
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 03:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ya'll would not belive what has happened. We brought mare home due to no problems in a few days and now has been almost 2 weeks and her and baby are doing great. No problems yet this far. She is on steriods and slowly taking her off. We let her out with the shetlands 1 day and was actually running and horse playin. We are not completly out of the woods yet. We will see what happens when we stop the steriods. I'm happy for now, but I think I will always worry. Ya'll have been great.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 227
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 03:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

saddlesore,
it is interesting that you mention that she had low magnesium levels. I suffer from migranes and the neurologist suggest that I take a magnesium supplement. Evidence of migranes/low magnesium . I wonder if there is any connection for your horse... stroke ?

Well anyways I will think of you all in my prayers as well. Best of luck to you, I know it is hard when the pocket book is low and you have to have vet work done. My husband lost his job about 3 years ago(after working for the company for 17 years) and we had a horse break a leg(have no idea how-found her down in the lot in front of our house in the morning --close to our house)and the vets office wanted 350.00 just to put her down. We about died ourselves, naturally we couldn't use that vet as we were living on unemployment at the time we had to search for a vet that was a little cheaper. I was so angry as the first vet told my husband to shoot her instead of paying him the 350.00. We did find another vet that charged us less than half that. Vet bills and the love of animals is a struggle. We have had to make some hard calls over the last 20 years.
kim
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 33
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 07:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Saddlesore, I am so glad to hear things took a turn for the better. It was a pretty ominous outlook from your previous posts. Please keep us all posted.
 

Elena Vieira
Nursing Foal
Username: Opheliaimmorttal

Post Number: 16
Registered: 11-2005
Posted on Tuesday, January 24, 2006 - 10:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

HI,
I am feeding a few scoops of LMF Development for Alfalfa. and either 2 flakes of alfalfa twice a day, or 1 flake of alfalfa and 1 flake of grass hay. I was wondering if this is okay or if i should feed even more, she is the only horse in the pasture so she can eat the alfalfa whenever she wants throughout the day, she also doesn't have grass.
thanks!
Elena
 

Kim Winter
Breeding Stock
Username: Clafairy

Post Number: 119
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Friday, January 27, 2006 - 08:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare was on grass, some loose hay and a small feed a day which included some chaff, oil, cider vinegar, sugar beet and vitamin and mineral supplement. I had been looking forward to changing her feed to the stud mix because it would mean we were nearing the end of all this waiting, now Ive changed to the stud mix Ive suddenly realised - I dont know what Im doing!! : )

I have added the stud mix to her feed and I cut out the vitimin and mineral supplement because I thought that they were all in the stud mix - Is that right, or should I still be feeding the supplement as well?? and theres no feeding instructions on the stud mix either, How do I know what I should be feeding her, I thought there would be a weight guide or something!?

Please help...
 

Sara B. (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.40.17.231
Posted on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 05:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi,
Just wondering how much calcium and phosphorus should be given to a pregnant mare in her first two trimesters and last trimester as well.
And if you guys have any info on vitamins.Like which ones are important to give her and how I can supply them.Thanks
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 145
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I know I have a foal that came from a mare that lacked a lot of vitamins, the previous owner did not believe in feeding pregnant mares grain, they just got grass hay, so as a result I have a foal that had the start of ODD (epiphysitis), due to a lack of vits and minerals, copper being the biggest culprit according to the vet. ( He figures that because of the ODD and because she has real thin hoof walls). I was told to feed a balanced feed like omolene 300, nutrena youth, purina mare and foal and to be sure to provide a free choice granular salt and mineral supplement.
As far as calcium phos, i am unsure...
 

Sara B. (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.40.17.231
Posted on Sunday, February 19, 2006 - 08:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I did find out that mares should get vitamins A and D and you can get them usely by letting your mare graze every day and giving her hay,but wasn't shure about other products that can help
provide them.Thanks for the info.
I also found out trough my research in the past
couple of hours that your mare should be given 0.2 percent calcium in the first two trimesters
and 0.4 percent in the last trimester,and that phosphorus should never exceed the rates of calcium.I'm not shure if this is true though.
Any other help would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 

Sara B. (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.40.17.231
Posted on Monday, February 20, 2006 - 11:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What is ODD and what does it stand for?
 

Heather Kutyba
Yearling
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 62
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 12:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sara,
You are probably referring to OCD, otherwise known as "Osteochondrosis". Mostly in relation to developmental orthopedic disease.
Osteochondrosis refers to problems related to bone and cartilage development.

This is a HUGE area of study, and controversy!
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 155
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 06:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here is what I know by learnong from tha vet and from researching myself...ODD is is developemental orthodic disease, which epiphysitis is classified as. It affects the joints and tendons and ligaments of the young growing horses, and can be quite serious if not caught early. some say it is too much protien in a growing foal, others say not enough, some say to fast of a growth rate with not enough nutrients, some say breeding halter horses for straight up and down legs...it is a highly contoversial subject. Symptoms of mine the vet was concerned about were at 3/12 months she began to grow 2 halter notches a week and by 4 months old needed a yearling qh halter and stood 13 hands tall. She was on no grain only grass pasture, she had a high angle to the fetlock, appeared her tendons were contracting, she had very "boxy" looking knees and fetlocks, (she had swelling in them, they were warm to the touch). We weaned her, put her on TDI 10, which is very balanced and high in copper but only 10% protien, we did that until her growth slowed down, then when the square look to her joints went away we put her on nutrena youth which is 14% protien, and grass hay with just a little alfalfa mixed in. ODD, some also call it DOD usually affects 3 months to 1 year of age, usually showing its first signs between 4 to 6 months. If you no an internet search on epiphysitis you will find all sorts of info on treatment and prevention of ODD/DOD.
mine at 10 months now has a nice angle ( a little upright yet but mom is bred for halter so she to is a bit upright), dn her swelling is gone. She will be checked thouroughly again this early spring and her diet will be adjusted for the summer once she begins on pasture again.
 

Sara B. (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.40.17.231
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've been trying to get information on other aspects of caring for pregnant mares as well, nutrition being the most difficult to find out about.When I want to know about one thing it seems like everything but what I'm searching for comes up.My close friends paint mare is in foal and I'm really excited about it.I just hope I can be there when she gives birth.I really didn't know if posting my questions would be of much use,but it turns out I was wrong.If I ever have any other questions this will be the first place I come to instead of looking all over creation to find things I usely can't find.Thanks so much for all the info.It's been more help than you know.If anybody still has information on calcium and phosphorus which I had posted earlier please say so.
 

Anonymous
 
Posted From: 207.69.2.113
Posted on Tuesday, February 21, 2006 - 10:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Another possibility is "DOD" which is a collective term - "Developmental Orthopaedic Disease" which will include OCD and epiphysis.
 

Cowgirl (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted From: 69.40.17.231
Posted on Saturday, February 25, 2006 - 09:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I don't really need to know about calcium and phosphorus anymore, just why phosphorus should never exceed calcium.As far as what I've read it soundsd like its something that is really important to remember.I'm using a differant user name now because it said my name(Sara b.)resembled someone elses.I don't know why,but, oh well.



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