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Colostrum Collection

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Colostrum Collection « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Jenn
Breeding Stock
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 163
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 05:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Has anyone tried to milk some colostrum from their mares to freeze in case of an emergency?

I have heard that some people do. If anyone here does, I have a few questions.

1. Will the antibodies still be viable even if the colostrum is frozen?
2. What do you freeze it in?
3. How long would you trust it to last?
4. How much is an adequate dose for a newborn foal?

I put a 20cc syringe full in my freezer. I had a mare that just foaled last night and so once I was certain the foal was nursing I would milk apx 5cc from the mare at a time, and I waited until the foal nursed, and when he was done I would swoop in and milk her a bit. I did it a few time over the course of the day so as not to rob the poor little gaffer of milk.

I was just wondering if I was the only one daffy enough to attempt such a thing.
 

Anj Bascom
Weanling
Username: Anj

Post Number: 45
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 08:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jenn, I have no idea but I'd like to know too! I know with people, the antibodies are there, to a point, but not near what they'd be fresh from Mom. With people milk, you can freeze it in any air tight container, glass or plastic, it lasts around 6 months, and as far as dosage I wouldn't know. But as far as storing, I would think it'd be the same as people. (Has a preemie baby and got REAL good and "milking" hehehe My questions is: What about this colostrum that she's leaking right now before she foals... Should I be trying to capture some of that for just in case?
 

Jenn
Breeding Stock
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 165
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, May 22, 2006 - 08:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank Anj. I figured that it might help to collect from the first mare to foal so that it might help if another mare has problems producing milk. I sure hope I never have to use it. Sorry but I cannot help you with the pre-foal colostrum. I just don't know.
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 775
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 08:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had contacted the national colostrum network when i thought i needed some, and i was given a list of namesto contact, but i was also told it must have been frozen immediately and in PLASTIC, glass will destroy the antibodies in equine colostrom.
I was also told if the mare is leakin by drips leave her alone, if hse is streaming to milk some out and freeze, and to use you have to thaw in fridge overnight, or in war, not hot water and then use immediately.
i hope this helps some...like i said if you can contact hte national colostrum network they may be able to tell you more!
 

Anj Bascom
Yearling
Username: Anj

Post Number: 53
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 09:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kris thanks! Just that little bit is so good to know. Like the glass thing, I would have had no idea it was different then people's, I was just throwing out ideas! haha I am leaving her alone now, but her bag's getting so big it looks like it's going to pop
 

Jenn
Breeding Stock
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 169
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 09:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Kris. Did they say what a minimum useful dose is? I am in Saskatchewan, Canada and I am not sure if there is such a thing as a "Colostrum Network" around here. This is an area that doesn't have a lot of horses, so it is difficult finding vets, and other equine services. The vet that is closest is great with my cat, but he is afraid of horses. He is for emergencies only. There is a good horse vet apx 3 hours away, but it is several hundred dollars just to get her to come this far ($250. I believe + the cost of whatever you get done).
 

Jenn
Breeding Stock
Username: Jenn

Post Number: 170
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 09:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Also, how long after foal is the mares milk still "colostrum"?
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 781
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 23, 2006 - 02:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

WARNING!!! LONG POST TO COVER ALL AREAS
the foal is able to absorb colostrum fully for 8 hours, then the effects are lessened for every hour over 8, but will continue to absorb for 18 to 24 hours.
i will type th einformation from a brochure that the colostrum bank sent me.
it tells how to establish your own colostrum bank, by using a healthy mare that will presumeably produce a healthy foal.
1. allow the new born foal to nurse for 2-3 hours
2.wipe off hte mares udder with a warm damp cloth until it is clean.
3.gently milk the mare into a cleana nd sterilized plastic container. Most mares produce some extra colostrum, so it is usually safe to milk out 500 ml to one liter (one pint to one quart) of colostrum per horse.
4.measure the volume collected.
5.if possible test the quality of hte colostrum
6. filter the colostrum through gauze into a clean plastic container (i used a playtex nurser bag)and place inside a ziploc bag for extra protection. Do not store the colostrum in glass because this will destroy the antibodies and ruin the quality of colostrum.
7. label with the mares name and date collected, amount collected and quality (if tested) using a permanant marker.
8. freeze colostrum in any home freezer , it cna be frozen for one year un a household freezer or 2 years in a deep freezer.
if possible routinely check all colostrum for quality. the more antibodies it contains hte better it is. the easiest method for assessing the quality is a colostrometer. a colostrometer measures specific gravity of hte colostrum.
good colostrum will measure 1060 or better. there is also and easy to use "snap test" available through vets to determine quality.
how to give colostrum to a foal:
whe you need to give replacement colostrum to a foal follow these steps
1, thaw the frozen colostrum at room temperature or in lukewarm water. DO NOT MICROWAVE! this will destroy hte antimbdies
2. give the foal 5-10% of its own body weight (one to two liters for a 100 pound foal)
feed witha bottle an a lambs nipple or with a stomache tube palced by a vet, give it in divided feedings over 6 hours time.
the foals intestinal absorbtive capeabilities are best hte first 2-8 hours of life and deteriorate rapidly after itis 12 hours old. at that point a plasma transfusion will be required, and is essential that that is given before foal reaches 24 hours old.
3. have your vet check hte foals blood to find out if an adequate level of immunoglobulins were absorbed.

hope that info helps.
here is a number to reach them if youd like (651) 647-8391 (located at the university of minnesota)
they are open 24/7/365.
sometimes you have to leave a message and your call will be returned.
good luck!
 

Jennifer S
Nursing Foal
Username: Jens

Post Number: 17
Registered: 05-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you for that very valuable info Kris!
 

Jonathan Smith
Breeding Stock
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 200
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, November 01, 2008 - 12:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Just another little note. Only collected the colostrum while the foal is nursing the other side and don't take any more they it does. This will help to assure that they get the amount that they need. Most mares are more receptive to you getting yours if the foal is back there anyway.



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