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Tying up membranes.

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Tying up membranes. « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Sharon Malmberg
Weanling
Username: Ryu2832

Post Number: 50
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So Ruby foals just fine, so I'm moving down my check list. Ruby starts passing her membranes, they get down to her hocks, so I try to tie them up.

I tried knots, I tried string, I tried a trash bag (saint of a mare to put up with me)...my boy scout brother couldn't come up with a knot that didn't slip out.

How do you 'tie them up'?
 

Dawn Garbett
Nursing Foal
Username: Stlfarm

Post Number: 13
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Monday, April 10, 2006 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am glad I am not the only one that has that problem!!! You should have seen the vet's face when I asked if there was a trick to it!!
 

Peggie M
Weanling
Username: Peggie_m

Post Number: 39
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 02:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm with ya! When our mare foaled, I had to hold it up while she was being stitched.... Boy is that thing heavy after a while! The vet didn't have any suggestions and saw me struggling with it so I'd sure like to know if there's some trick to it.... GREAT QUESTION SHARON!!
 

Sharon Malmberg
Yearling
Username: Ryu2832

Post Number: 52
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 - 10:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So cold, so slimey...(shudder)
 

Megan A Brown
Nursing Foal
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 12
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 05:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our mares came off an old school ranch so they have always foaled outside. You put them in a stall by themselves for more than an hour and they come unglued. So we decied foaling on pasture is probably really the best option for our old girls. They still get regular nightly checks thanks to a high powered spot light, but often our mares will move between the foal's first nursing and the full delivery of the placenta. We always make sure baby has nursed but if the mare seems fine, we usually wont worry too much about the placenta until we come back to recheck them in an hour or so. Out on a large pasture mama and baby can move quite a bit in an hour or two so some times the placenta is no where to be found. I really have no desire to see my mares turn septic, so in the morning my sister and I go placenta hunting. I swear it's like Easter egg hunting for grown ups! really large nasty Easter eggs I've never had to tie up membranes but I have had to pack them in off the back forty to assess and dispose of in eighty degree weather. So it could be worse :-).
 

Megan A Brown
Nursing Foal
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 13
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 05:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

On a more relevant note I think the gal who wrote blessed are the broodmares had some trick for it, or that might have been in The complete guide to foaling.
 

Sharon Malmberg
Yearling
Username: Ryu2832

Post Number: 59
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 10:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've read both books. One says tie it up, the other says use string. Neither worked for me.

My boy scout brother suggested a short stick to wrap the membrane around around then tie it. I don't know about a stick, but I'm eyeballing those flexible hair rollers--the ones that bend in half. That or I'm thinking of using a yarn needle to 'darn' it up--that might be faster.

This mare was pretty nice about the whole thing. Next year the first to foal is going to be a dragon, I won't have much time to do anything. She might be a candidate for the placenta hunting option.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10573
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 01:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've never particularly had reliable success tying them up to themselves... :-)

I take a length of baler twine, and tie it in a simple overhand not toward the vulval end of the membranes, with an equal amount of string left each side. Then take the bottom (hanging end) of the membranes and bring it up to the top - you may have to loop it over your arm or have someone hold it until you get the hang of that - and tie another knot. If needed, repeat the last process again.

Not tying up the membranes creates the risk of the mare standing on them and breaking them off prematurely. The weight of the membranes hanging is part of the mechanism related to their passage. If they are broken off, there is a greater chance of retained placenta. Although it isn't going to be an issue every time, as it's an easy thing to do, we consider that it is an important part of the post-foaling protocol.
 

Kathee McGuire
Breeding Stock
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 368
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 - 02:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I guess I was lucky with mine because it stayed tied. I did used the baling twine from a hay bale and I can't remeber any particular secret other than I wrapped the twine around the end first and then flipped it up working in about 8 to 10 inch section and wrapped it again. I did this several times until it was 10 inches off the ground. Being my first time, I can tell you I didn't remember to do it until I saw my mare standing on it and then my brain kicked in. Mind you...I forgot the gloves too...yuck...reminded me of chicken skin. It completely grossed out my support group audience as they didn't know that had to be done. My weak stomached husband kept offering (bless his kind heart), but I was afraid I would be cleaning up more than the placenta if he had to do it!
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 611
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 13, 2006 - 06:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

kathee that is too funny, you know those men are so "STRONG" yah right until it comes time for something like that!!!(or unless they are sick) then they turn into sissy's! :-)



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