MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

What's the next best thing to straw?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » What's the next best thing to straw? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 22
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 07:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have been completely unsuccessful finding any kind of straw in coastal Alabama - just not one of our crops. I am still looking, but losing faith. The breeders in this area seem to all use shavings and some foal in the pasture. Now that I know all the reasons not to do that, I am afraid to. I can get construction hay, but it will probably be dusty and might be moldy. I can also get pine straw, but that doesn't sound good either. Any thoughts?
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 221
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Wednesday, January 18, 2006 - 08:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, What about just using hay ? A cutting that has been rained on yet dry .The horses can eat it and it would be better than the sawdust. Once some hay gets rained on it dries out like straw anyways. I just would not buy it if it were not dry before it was baled. That way it should not be moldy and too dusty. Just food for thought.
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 23
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 09:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I can use hay. I can get a bahia(sp) that they feed to cows. Is it ok for not harboring the bacteria?
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 222
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 11:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee , I am not sure what kind of hay that is, I will try to find out ... Is it something that you would normally feed to a horse in your area ? You will find some bacteria in straw but not like the stuff in shavings and the small pieces that can get into the mare. If worse comes to worse and nothing but shavings is available in your neck of the woods then I would resort to baled shavings. This it is more of a shaving and normally kiln dried so that the bacteria is less likely to be present. Saw dust is too fine and the actual dust can cause respitory problems in a foal too because they lay down in in so much and can inhale the dust. Sortta like a human baby... they are now teaching new parents not to dump baby powder on a infant because of the dust... take the powder and put some on your hand away from the baby and then gently disperse it on the infant type thing. Talk with some breeders in your area and see what kind of problems or sucess they have with different bedding. They may be able to suggest some ideas as they are dealing with the lack of straw all the time. Like I said you could resort to the baled shavings if that is all that is available.
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 26
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Kim - Bahia is a common pasture grass for horses here and they like it well as grass. As a hay, most horses don't care for it much. They use it a lot for cows. It is readily available and not as expense as horses hay.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 224
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Thursday, January 19, 2006 - 04:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, sorry I can't be of more help. Sure hope that you find what you need. If the Bahia is something that horses tend to eat anyways, and it you can get it fairly inexpensive , then I would think that it should be ok to use. Horses tend to like to eat straw too, and we like to use it because it can be a filler with little problem while a horse is just standing around in a stall. Where we seem to go through more hay while they are bedded on sawdust/shavings. The Bahia hay might just be your answer. Is it ok for horses to eat as a hay and they just don't care for it much ? Or something that they should not consume as a hay .

Kim
 

Heather Kutyba
Nursing Foal
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 20
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 12:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee,
I was in the same predicament as you. Here in TX, especially as southern as I am, straw is pretty hard to find.
I like to have my mares foal out in stalls, in lieu of pastures...for safety (dystocias) reasons, and I can monitor them easily day and night.
As KimK has suggested, I use Kiln dried compressed large chips/shavings. They are very large, no dust, and are soft...foals love to lay in them w/out the concern on inhalent issues. This was the only compromise I was able to come to. The compressed Kiln dried are expensive, but worth it if you can find them.
My new foal, oblivious to the work it took for me to find this expensive bedding, sleeps in the hay I put down for my mare frequently. Not sure about where you are at, but we have coastal hay here. It very possibly could make a suitable bedding. However, I'm not familiar/knowledgable regarding any bacteria it carries.
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 29
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 09:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks...I was starting to think Mobile, Alabama was the only place that wasn't allow to have straw! I will look for the Kiln dried large chips. I just want to know I have done everything I can to prepare for an uncomplicated, successful birth. I will let my little guy/gal sleep in Momma's hay if he wants, also!
 

Judith Zachary
Neonate
Username: Zacharyfarms

Post Number: 1
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We always use soft Bermuda Hay in lieu of straw for foaling. We mix Alfalfa and Bermuda Hay for eating for the last trimester to eliminate any fescue from their diet and the alfalfa aids in milk production. The Bermuda gives a very nice bed for the new foal and is more flexible and doesn't stick in their eyes, etc. like straw.
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 30
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 10:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I feel like I have some options now. All I kept reading was straw, straw, straw and since I knew enough to know there is a difference, I wasn't sure. When I called around asking about straw for bedding, eveyone here thought I meant pine straw. It truly is a foreign word in these parts!
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 225
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 01:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

So Kathee do you have straw available to you ? Thats great if it was just a misunderstanding between those that you asked ! If not some type of hay would work ok or even the kiln dried shavings if you must. Really don't fret about it too much. There has been those that foal on the shavings many times and don't have any trouble as well as sawdust but it is a good precaution that can be taken so that infection does not set in . (i know my luck would be to use the sawdust for foaling and I would have trouble !).

Kim}
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 32
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 01:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well, the only straw I have is pine straw which I always called pine needles before moving here. After calling all the local suppliers, I couldn't find any kiln dried shavings. And all in all, local horse people now think I am pretty nuts with all my concern over wheat/oat straw so I think I will just quietly buy some lower end hay and not mention what I am using it for!
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 226
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 02:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, what is your concern over wheat/oat straw ? That is what we use here that is what we call straw. Oat straw tends to be a bit cleaner for some reason... my husband could go into more info as he is the one that does the harvesting (I just provide some of the manual labor !)

Pine shavings can be found at most of the Tractor supply stores(tsc), Rural King, Farm and Fleet stores as well as local feed mills, farm and garden stores.
Kim
 

Heather Kutyba
Weanling
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 21
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Friday, January 20, 2006 - 08:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Kathee,
Regardless of what you use, as long as it's not dusty, you will probably be fine. I, like you, stress (and was in distress!) to do everything right. What I had to remember, is that I have to trust in the um-tee-ump of years
...that horses have been doing this without us
...without clean conditions, without assistance, without navel dip, in the rain, snow, mud, etc
....AND somehow they have managed to exist to this day.
THIS MUST account for something in my favor, and it will for you as well.
Even knowing these things, I still wasn't swayed from doing everything I could, even when heckeled and laughed at from others :-) .
This comes from someone who has a foaling kit that rallies any surgical ward, and I only used 2-3 things in it. Mostly, just on principle!
Warm wishes,
Heather
 

Kathee McGuire
Weanling
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 34
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Saturday, January 21, 2006 - 10:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well thank you for that...I need to lighten up a little. A little perspective is helpful. Your comments reminded me of something I heard Bill Cosby say regarding natural child birth classes: "Intellectuals are people who study how to do things that come naturally".



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US