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Stall size for foaling

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Stall size for foaling « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Kathee McGuire
Neonate
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 2
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Wednesday, December 21, 2005 - 09:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a small barn designed with a gate system to allow me to create multiple size stalls depending on my needs. The largest size would be 26' by 12'. What is the best size for foaling? Also, should I consider letting her foal in a small private pasture (1/2 acre)? She is due the end of March and our weather in south Alabama is usually mild that time of year. This is my first foal and I really am trying to learn as much as possible.
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 193
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2005 - 09:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Consider your mares dispostion before letting her foal outside. Is she easy to handle , has she foaled before, what is your wild creature population like ??? Things to think about. I think our foaling stalls are 12 x 16...
 

Kim Winter
Weanling
Username: Clafairy

Post Number: 47
Registered: 07-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2005 - 10:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I think most faoling boxes Ive seen are 14 x 14, but mine is 16 x 14 for a 16hh mare, Also you should consider the type of mare - ie, TB or native pony, natives are better to foal outside generally speaking from what Ive learnt - this is also my first though.

Hope we've been helpful : )
 

Teri R
Neonate
Username: Eminentarabians

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2005 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've heard a lot of people use regular 12x12's. My foaling stall is 10x24 and there is ample room for my mare, but, she isn't a large horse either.
 

Teri R
Neonate
Username: Eminentarabians

Post Number: 4
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2005 - 10:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Forgot to add that i agree with the poster above, consider your mare's personality before deciding to let her foal in a pasture (however small it may be). If she has a problem with the foal, rejects him/her, etc, she could make it very difficult for you to catch her, etc.

Wildlife is something else to think about as well.
 

Kathee McGuire
Neonate
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 3
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2005 - 02:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks. She is a 15 hand quarter horse and the alpha of my three. If she has foaled before, she would have been a 2 yr old because I know her history since then. The breeder said there were no obvious signs she had ever foaled and considered her a maiden mare. She is spirited, but not mean and we have a great relationship. The pasture is right out of my dining room window where as the barn is two acres away. We really don't have trouble with harmful wildlife. I really want to be there for the birth, although I know she probably won't need me at all. I have even looked into a camera for the stall to monitor her at night. I appreciate everyone's input and I have grown to love this site the last few weeks!
 

Emma
Yearling
Username: Emma

Post Number: 59
Registered: 09-2005
Posted on Thursday, December 22, 2005 - 08:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, the important thing for you is to be there when the foal is born and to make sure you can get some light in there if she foals at night and you need to see what is going on. I'm in Australia and we don't have to worry about things like cougars etc ... stealing new born foals. Make sure you have the stable ready though in case it is wet, if we are having bad weather (and its been really unpredictable at the moment) ours foal in the stables. If we have good weather they foal in the paddock but i am always there with them and the foaling paddock has easy access to light. If it's during the day and the weather is good i would say the paddock will surfice!
Good luck!
 

Lazy IDH
Neonate
Username: Lazyidh

Post Number: 8
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, December 23, 2005 - 01:06 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathie...If I were you...I would let her foal in the pasture. It sounds like it is much closer to the house which will be more convenient for you. After my friend's mare foaled in a stall and stood up to reposition the foal, when it was halfway out, thereby slamming it into the wall and breaking its back, I opt to let my mares foal in a small half acre pasture right outside our house. It is very convenient, in that with a couple of dimly lit lightbulbs, I can see the whole pasture and merely have to lift up out of bed to see if foaling is imminent. Better than a camera!
I just feel safer having my mares foal there even though we have a big roomy new barn with a 13 x 18 stall available. I just feel they're easier to keep an eye on in the small pasture. Of course, all the fencing is foal proof and to the ground to prevent her delivering through the fence or the foal rolling out underneath.
And there is a roomy three-sided shelter in there also, in case of inclement weather.
 

Kathee McGuire
Neonate
Username: Katheekj

Post Number: 5
Registered: 12-2005
Posted on Friday, December 23, 2005 - 10:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is great input and you have all given me things to consider that I had not already. Thanks for helping me. I don't know what I would do if something went wrong and I later found out I could have avoided the problem. I will probably be a wreck by March and the first time I close my eyes, she will deliver!

(Message edited by katheekj on December 23, 2005)
 

Kim k
Breeding Stock
Username: Kimk

Post Number: 194
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, December 23, 2005 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kathee, it happens every time. :-) You will work so hard to be there when it happens and you will miss it. Been raising babies for almost 20 years and we do the barn checks and everything. I would say we miss about half of them. We will start checking the barn and think the mares are going to foal and then they decide to wait another few days. you will drive yourself nuts !! Most of our mares seem to foal in the wee hours of the morning between 3 am and 6 am. Do have one mare that normally foal about 11 am. Most of the time the mares keep the same pattern from year to year for us, but every once in a while they will slip a change in , this year the two mares that I had bred both foaled in the evening-- it was odd as they normally for in the early am. ?? Just when you think you have them figured out :-)

Good Luck
Kim
 

Lisa Weir
Yearling
Username: Pals_pal

Post Number: 96
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Monday, December 26, 2005 - 06:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a neat little set up with yards that are quite big and have a box in one corner. There are two and they both have gates to a larger paddock. The mares foal in the yards and the new family can be confined to the box if needed.
Next morning if all is well, they are let out into the paddock and stay there to bond for up to a week, before they are let out with others of similar ages.

This works really well for us.
 

Bill and Debbie Meehan
Neonate
Username: Rising_star_sport_horses

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2006
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2006 - 12:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is first year breeding. Our reg. stalls are 15'deep x 12' wide. Our mare is in the end stall, which has double dutch doors leading out onto her own paddock. She will be moved to that paddock shortly before her due date and stay there until the foal is strong enough to go out to the bigger paddock.
 

Elise Krueger
Neonate
Username: Elise

Post Number: 4
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 12, 2006 - 09:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi everyone. We have 3 foaling stalls. 2 are 14X20 and one we just built for a recently purchased mare is 20X20. She is 16-3 and wears a 90 blanket. We foal as soon after Jan 1st that we can.... (futurity babies) and living in Minnesota, we felt the stalls needed to be big so the babies could exercise some in the stalls. We have a small 40X60 area in the barn (sand floor) that the mare and babies are turned out in 2 X a day...mare can roll and babies can really stretch out and run.....on decent days, moms and babies have a paddock area with a run-in just outside the barn. Foaling this early is not for everyone as sometimes its well below zero when the babies are born. We do not have a heated barn, but each stall has a infared heater in it and within a very short time the babies only lay under the heater. Of course it is a must that we are there for foaling and dry the baby quickly and blanket them immediately. Has worked well for us. This is a wonderful site and it's great to read about everyone's experiences. We A.I. our mares and there is some great information here.



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