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Help! 2 Week Old Filly Sick

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Help! 2 Week Old Filly Sick « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Candi Shanholtzer
Weanling
Username: Canchaser

Post Number: 50
Registered: 03-2010
Posted on Friday, April 23, 2010 - 11:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey guys,

I am panicing a little- my 2 week olf filly has just came down with something this afternoon and I have no clue what it is. When i came home from work, I noticed my mares udders were really full and and my filly seemed lethargic. Just yesterday, she was running and bucking all over the pasture. I thought maybe she hurt herself, so I did a thorough check over and couldn't find anything. No scratches, swelling or limping. I took her temperature and it was 103.5 Oh no!!!! I called the vet and he wants me to give her Banamine, Gentocin, and Penicillin and bring her in in the AM. I gave her the Gentocin and Banamine, but don't have any Pennicillin, so may need to start that in the AM.
Here are the symptoms I am now seeing: She is really itching her hind legs alot and swishing tail some. I haven't seen her poop yet, so i am wonderng if she is a little blocked up since she just recently starting eating hay. But can they get a fever from being blocked up for this short of time? I have a enema I could give. She is urinating normally. She is nursing from Mom, but only a little. She is munching on hay still. She basically seems a little agitated and depressed.
Also, I just noe found a tick on her tiny utter, I removed it (carefully). Anyone know if that could be the culprit? Also oddly, my mare seems to be urinated frequently and itching her hind end some as well. Not sure if it is just mosquitos or if there is something going on with both. She shouldn't be coming into heat yet as baby is 2 weeks, 4 days old. Any comments/thoughts you have would be GREATLY appreciated. It will be a long night tonight.
 

hedgerow farm
Weanling
Username: Lotsofponies

Post Number: 29
Registered: 03-2009
Posted on Saturday, April 24, 2010 - 10:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How's your filly doing, sorry I didn't get online to see your post yesterday? Was it the tick? Please keep us up dated.
 

Candi Shanholtzer
Yearling
Username: Canchaser

Post Number: 51
Registered: 03-2010
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 03:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I lost my beautiful filly today (Sat AM) I am in utter heartbreak and disbelief. I finally found a small hard swelling around her umbilical area. The vet said the three drugs he had me give is exactly what they would give in clinic and to bring her in the morning. She nursed better throughout the night and then crashed as I was hooking the trailer up. To go from a filly running and bucking literally 24 hours before to this..I just can"t believe it. I did NOt have the IgG checked which I will always regret. The mare never dripped colostrom and the healthy foal was born perfect and up and nursing like a champ immediately. She was running within the first 24 hours. I dipped the navel immediately exactly as the vet had instructed. This mare has had several babies with her previous owner that are now healthy adult horses. I am just so frustrated. I have her breeding already paid for this year, but am seriously considering finding her a new home because I don't know if my heart can go through this again. I have friends that don't do half the preventative care that I do and it seems they have half the problems. Sorry to vent so much.
My mare is doing pretty well, all things considered. I let her stay with the foal for several hours and that seemed to help when I took the foal away. I put her in with my other two mares and they are taking excellent care of her. My barrel mare has been touching heads with her all day (I swear it looks like a hug). Is there anything I can give her to help her with her udder?
 

sally
Breeding Stock
Username: Sally_c

Post Number: 123
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 04:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Candi, I am so sorry to here you lost your filly, my thoughts are with you.
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 457
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 11:39 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, Candi, I am so sorry for you and your mare. I know how you feel about really taking care of your animals and things go wrong when others barely bother and seem to have all the luck. I also lost a foal but it was at the 6 month pregnancy mark so not near as heart breaking. I hurt for you.
 

Brittany Hindes
Yearling
Username: Bhindes

Post Number: 73
Registered: 08-2009
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 12:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Candi,

I am so sorry to hear your loss. Things will get better for you. I too lost a foal this year we had to have her put down when she was only 1 1/2 days old, so I know how you feel. Now I just bred her again for a 2011 foal. Hope 2011 will be a better year for both of us.

Brittany
 

hedgerow farm
Weanling
Username: Lotsofponies

Post Number: 31
Registered: 03-2009
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 12:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I can't believe it, I'm so sorry. I don't know what to say! Hugs,
 

Candi Shanholtzer
Yearling
Username: Canchaser

Post Number: 52
Registered: 03-2010
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 01:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the support. It has been about 24 hours and I just can't stop crying. My heart is just broken right now. I hope it will fade with time. The stallion of this filly was 29 and just died a week ago. She was my dream filly and everything I hoped and prayed for. I guess I should just be happy god gave her to me for 2 1/2 weeks. Every time I close my eyes I see her running across the pasture, setting the world on fire.
 

Marilyn Lemke
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 2678
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My heart aches for you Candi. I'm so sorry for your loss of your precious little filly.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2822
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, April 25, 2010 - 04:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

These little guys crash and burn so fast it will make your head spin, but unfortunately you know that now.

There are several things that you might want to consider for the future:
  • As you noted, running and IgG check. You can also check the mare's colostrum for antibody content, but the foal's absorbency is the most important. Remember you want to confirm good passive transfer by 12 hours if you intend using an oral IgG supplement (which is preferable as it's a lot cheaper, and also protects the foal sooner than waiting and doing a plasma transfer);
  • You don't expand on how you dipped the navel or with what, but the correct protocol is to dip with ½% Chlorhexidine multiple times a day until the stump has dried up;
  • Take temperatures of foals that "don't look right". A rough guide is:
    • 99-101: not abnormal;
    • 102: watch closely and check regularly;
    • 103: there's probably something bad going on;
    • 104: you're definitely in trouble;
    • 105: you're in deep trouble.
  • Get the vet out immediately there is something amiss. Don't wait and don't let the vet talk you into waiting (as was commented upon in your other copy of this thread). Make sure the attending vet is well-versed in equine neonatal issues;
  • Gentamycin is good against gram-negative organisms, but is not broad-spectrum. Ceftiofur sodium (typically brand-name Excenel or Naxcel) is more commonly used to combat suspected neonatal septicaemia. Gentamycin has been "piggybacked" with that drug to give additional gram-negative protection, but there is also a risk associated with its use related to kidney damage in the neonate.
Many of us have "been there, done that", and it's a sad fact of breeding that if you're in it for long, you're going to lose foals, no matter what. All you can do is chalk it down to a learning experience and move on. Not intending to sound "hard" about it, but hopefully you'll look back in a few months time when the cut's not so raw, and you'll understand what I'm saying. As for not breeding back... what do you do when you get bucked off? You get back on and ride...

Keep an eye on your mare's udder. It will probably go down by itself, but be on guard for it getting hot and hard, which could be indicative of mastitis. It can be hard to fight the urge to milk it a little to make her feel more comfortable, but if you do that you'll stimulate milk production, so it's probably better not to.
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1253
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 26, 2010 - 02:56 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Candi, I am so very sorry! I don't even know what to say. That is so sad and I ache for you. Sending you hugs. I hope the good memories will carry you through. Take care of yourself.
 

Lisa Jenkins
Weanling
Username: Texas_paints

Post Number: 23
Registered: 04-2010
Posted on Friday, April 30, 2010 - 01:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Candi,

I am so sorry to hear about your loss. I know how hard it is to lose a baby. Last year i lost my little colt, and it was heart breaking. I bred my mare 2 months after she lost the colt, and we were blessed with a beautiful pintaloosa colt 2 days ago.
I ran the IgG test, and he did come back vvery low. His was at 400 and it should be at 800. We did the Plasma Transfusion and he is doing great.

I think you should be okay to breed her again. i thought about not breeding her last year, but in the end it has a great reward.

I would for sure get the IgG test done next time. It is worth it.

Hang in there Candi time will heal your pain.
 

Candi Shanholtzer
Yearling
Username: Canchaser

Post Number: 53
Registered: 03-2010
Posted on Saturday, May 01, 2010 - 01:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lisa,

Thanks for the encouragement. I am finally starting to feel better. If I do keep my mare, I will definitely do the IgG test next year. I heard one person on here say that they give Seramune (not sure if I spelled it correctly) immediately to all of their colts. Does anyone know if that is safe and wont falsely throw off the IgG results?? If it is fine, I would be really tempted to do it to try to be extra careful and get that immune system jump started.
 

Marilyn Lemke
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 2736
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Saturday, May 01, 2010 - 10:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Candi, I believe Jos knows about Seramune, hopefully he will see this post and be able to tell you his feelings about this product.

I've had a foal the needed plasma because he was under 400 on the IgG test. It was very expensive, but I didn't feel I had a choice.

What I did with the birth of my last foal, I ordered frozen colostrum at a colostrum bank and had that on hand. I am so thankful I did, we had to put the mare down because she prolapsed her intestants and couldn't be saved. We milked her and got about a cup before she was put down. Then I thawed out the colostrum and gave it to the foal. When we did the IgG test, it registered over 800, so she was fine. Thank God!

Anyway, this year in June, we have another mare that will foal and I already have my frozen colostrum in the freezer. My husband said he's giving it to the foal no matter what. This might be overkill, because the mare will probably have sufficient colostrum, but my husband doesn't want to take the chance.

Just a thought on what we experienced and what we're doing.
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 3304
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 01, 2010 - 10:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Seramune is the ONLY equine based colostrum replacer. It is completely safe, and a great idea. I would do exactly as you are intending, and give the next foal the frozen even if it is overkill....always better to be safe than sorry in my opinion.
 

Cjskip
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 1267
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, May 01, 2010 - 03:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Here, here. My God, it is so sad hearing about these losses. I just ache for you and your mare, Candi. But it does teach us important imformation. So thank-you for posting what the outcome was.

Candi, I've never lost a foal, but if you loved the whole process, please don't throw in the towel. Oh what do I know? But I hear people who have lost foals, encouraging you to try again. So I hope you will be on this board again.

Jos, God bless you for this resource.
 

Candi Shanholtzer
Yearling
Username: Canchaser

Post Number: 54
Registered: 03-2010
Posted on Monday, May 03, 2010 - 09:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Unfortunately, it sometimes takes a disaster to truly prepare us. I worked as an assistant at a vet clinic for 12 years and felt very prepared for my foal. My mare was fed 75% alfalfa, 25% grass from a reputable hay grower. The mare grew an early, huge bag and gave me no indication she might have ate some fescue (which I now have to believe she did). I will always test IgG after this, regardless. I live in a small community and almost no one around here does the IgG. Even as hard and terrible as this has been for me, if one person reads this post before their mare foals and decides they better test the foal, it is worth it. Believe me when I say you can have a picture perfect delivery and 100% healthy looking foal and have them die in less than 24 hours from showing ANY symptoms of a problem. Here is a picture i took of my filly 2 days before she died. She was the nicest foal I've had.
http://i944.photobucket.com/albums/ad281/rbmakemeproud/102_2719.jpg
 

Lisa Jenkins
Weanling
Username: Texas_paints

Post Number: 30
Registered: 04-2010
Posted on Tuesday, May 04, 2010 - 10:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Candi,

I am a former barrel racer, and I know how important these barrel horses can be. She was sssooooo pretty, and looking at her makes me tear up. I am so glad that you posted this blog, because I was one of those people who was not going to do the test, and if I would not of done it I too would of been in this situation. I am still so sorry for your loss. I hope all goes well with your mare and her loss. She will be better in about a month or so.

Hang in there Candi we are here for you!



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