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Long pasterns, help please

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Long pasterns, help please « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Becky
Neonate
Username: Becky247

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2009
Posted on Sunday, June 07, 2009 - 09:42 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi,

My mum called me this morning to say that we have just had a new addition to the family-our first filly who looks gorgeous, the only thing is that she has long pasterns.

I live away from home so haven't seen her for myself yet but would really like someone to give me a bit of information as I personally don't really know what we can do about it, if anything. I have tried searching the internet and there is limited info, I did find a page on Dallmer flaccidity shoes, are they the best solution or is there a chance that they can correct themselves? I know this is probably a simple question but I'm worried and would really like some help please.

Thanks so much in advance :-)
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2471
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Sunday, June 07, 2009 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If the pastern is long, then the pastern is long - you're dealing with bone length, and you can't shorten the bone up! It's not a condition, it's a conformational fact.

If, OTOH, you're talking about flaccid pasterns (or more correctly the tendon), that is different, and in most cases, will sort themselves out in the few days after birth. Only the more extreme and persistent cases need attention.
 

Becky
Neonate
Username: Becky247

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2009
Posted on Sunday, June 07, 2009 - 11:26 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

fair enough Jos. my concern was that she is standing on her front heels, but it sounds like this could just be the tendons so fingers crossed it'll just be a few days until she's perfect(!) Sorry but what does OTOH mean?

Thanks for getting back to me
 

Diana Gilger
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 2389
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Sunday, June 07, 2009 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

"On The Other Hand*...
Good luck with your foal!
 

Samantha
Breeding Stock
Username: Dressage_diva333

Post Number: 712
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Sunday, June 07, 2009 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Becky, I dealt with lax tendons one year. You want controlled excercise. Put her in a small area during the day where she can move around a little bit, but lock her in the stall at night. Like Jos, said, the should correct in a few days. My filly's front tendons tightened up quickly, but we ended up having to put some little shoes on her hind ones to help them tighen correctly.

Good luck!
 

Ad TB
Breeding Stock
Username: Ajvtbs

Post Number: 869
Registered: 01-2009
Posted on Monday, June 08, 2009 - 05:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Samantha, sounds like tendon laxity, she needs controlled exercise, not more than an hour at a time in a small paddock and box rest for the rest of the time. She will improve with time but it may take a few weeks
 

Ann
Yearling
Username: Northernperch

Post Number: 74
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, June 08, 2009 - 03:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Let me add my 2 cents....in draft horses we see foals that are down on their pasterns and we think this is actually a good thing! Long pasterns are what we want and, as the foal grows, the legs get stronger and the pasterns come up. It could take a few weeks. We had 2 foals this year that were down on their pasterns and they look great now...both are 13.1HH at 3 1/2 months old.

I wouldn't worry too much at this point and like others have suggested, let the baby exercise as much as she wants to.

Good luck!
 

Becky
Neonate
Username: Becky247

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2009
Posted on Monday, June 08, 2009 - 05:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you so much everyone, you've been really supportive and I know that I've asked some really simple questions but it's our first time so thank you again for putting up with me :-)

Just to let you know I went to see her for the first time today and she has been out to the menage and did need a bit of help but at 1 day old we're expecting slow progress, she's also feeding well and we're just pleased to have her with us at the moment, I'll let you know how she gets on.



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