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Orphan foal erratic breathing

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Orphan foal erratic breathing « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Naomi Baker
Neonate
Username: Dogwoodranch

Post Number: 1
Registered: 06-2008
Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - 02:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We have a filly who's mother died a few hours after birth due to a prolapsed uterus...the baby got at least 6 oz of colostrum via baby bottle, she is very weak and sleeps a LOT. We have her on feedings every 2 hours right now, with a milk substitute, but she's not drinking a whole lot, maybe one or two ounces a time. We have her get up and move around before she gets fed, but as soon as she eats anything, she tenses up her stomach, and it looks like she's in pain. When she's laying down resting, her breathing is labored, and also changes speed frequently. She'll have a few deep breaths, and then a bunch of shallow ones, and then more deep ones. Anyone have anything of help? Is the strange breathing pattern normal?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 2019
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - 10:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Talk to your vet and have the foal evaluated.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 611
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - 01:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Naomi, I'm soooooo sorry you lost the mare and that the foal is not doing well. Very sad. And now to raise a orphaned foal-you have your hands full. Fortunately, there are some alternatives. Is this your first foal?

I hope your vet has been out by now. No, this is not normal-or at least-doesn't sound normal. You really do need to have the vet out ASAP. Even if they were present when your mare died, your foal is doing poorly and needs to be checked now. This sounds like a very serious problem. Don't mean to scare you, or maybe I am, but just trying to impress that a vet is needed.

Please keep us posted. My thoughts are with you.
 

Naomi Baker
Neonate
Username: Dogwoodranch

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2008
Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - 10:26 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The sweet little girl died this afternoon...I'm crying as I write this, because she's the 3rd foal at our friend's ranch to die this summer. I am just about ready to go on a rampage against Fescue, or at least on it's effects on a pregnant mare and her baby. The foal's breathing irregularity was likely fluid in her lungs, and she stopped eating and wouldn't get up anymore, so she was taken on a trip to the vet to see if they could possibly do anything, but she didn't survive the trip.
 

Naomi Baker
Neonate
Username: Dogwoodranch

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2008
Posted on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 - 10:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

oh, and to answer Cjskip's question, the foal wasn't ours...yet. She was supposed to be ours, and was owned by some folks that we help out with their group of horses. And no, she wasn't my first foal, he's doing just fine, and is a cute little brat - born on the 18th of May. I was SO glad that we took every precaution possible with him and his mother, and her birthing basically went without a glitch (we were watching a movie, went out afterwards, and he was already up and nursing!) Thank you everyone for this board, it's been a valuable reference more than once this year.
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 355
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Thursday, June 12, 2008 - 09:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is classic fescue poisoning. From the mare to the foal.
You can't get away from fescue in most parts of the country, you CAN live with it and it doesn't have to be a disaster. We are in the Clemson University area and they have done some excellent research involving fescue/fescue poisoning as well as developing the domperidone protocol for the late stages.

Here is an excellent link to a good article.
http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/toxicagents/fesalk.html
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 616
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 04:12 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Naomi, I've been away from the board for a bit and just saw this. I'm sorry the little one died. It is always sad. I'm glad you have your healthy youngster. Maybe he will help you emotionally.

Catherine, thanks for posting the article. As far as I know we don;t have fescue in the Central Valley of CA., but not sure, so more research to be done on my part.



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