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Letting mare/foal in pasture

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Letting mare/foal in pasture « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Emily S
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgrl88

Post Number: 187
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2008 - 06:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How soon can you let the mare and baby into the pasture? And if everything goes good and everyone is healthy and strong, is it ok if I take them out for a little bit the day after the foal is born?
 

Paul Liberty
Yearling
Username: Sptxthrill

Post Number: 77
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2008 - 07:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily, I usually let them out the 2nd day but if I notice the mare is going to run the legs off the foal, I'll bring them back in and then gradually let them stay out longer each time I turn them out. The main thing is to watch that the mare won't stress out the foal by running and the foal trying to keep up. Sometimes it just depends on the mare, the foal, and the pasture and the other horses that are around. Here I have 3 small turnout pens next to the barn so if I have to bring them back in, it's no big deal. Usually the foals don't follow very good at first and it takes awhile for them to figure out they can get out of the stall and go outside and play!
 

Jonathan Smith
Yearling
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 70
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2008 - 07:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily

It all depends on the weather. Newborn foals don't regulate their temperature very well. If it is warm and sunny they can overheat quickly. Also a small paddock alone would be best for the first few days

If the mare and foal are healthy it is good for both to get out. It helps the mare regain tone in her uterus which helps expel any build up fluids and any exercise will strenghthen the foal. We usually limit the newborns to 2 hours 2 times a day for the first two days. Day three and four - 4 hours twice a day. Days six and beyond, if health and weather are still not a factor, they can stay out all day.

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 22, 2008)
 

Emily S
Breeding Stock
Username: Cowgrl88

Post Number: 188
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 22, 2008 - 11:04 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

How soon can I let them out with the other horses? I'll definitely keep them alone for a while in their own paddock but my mare does like her buddies. Lol. I just don't want the foal to get kicked or anything.
 

Diana Gilger
Breeding Stock
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 273
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 01:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily, I typically keep my mares with foals up for about 5-6 days...they have a large pen to play in, but not with other horses. After that, I reintroduce them to the herd one horse at a time...letting her out with first one other, then the next day 2 others, etc. It seems to work out great that way, and mom's not freaking out feeling the need to run her baby all over the place avoiding curious others. Also, I keep new mommy and foal in a pen where the other horses can completely surround them, and everybody knows everybody before mom and foal are turned out. I don't really worry about foals getting kicked around here, as usually the moms are very protective still at a week, and the other horses won't really come near the foal without mommy running them off, or taking the foal and running away. it only takes a few days of getting used to being back in the herd.
 

Terry Waechter maravilla and her posse
Breeding Stock
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 250
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 02:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have five mares with foals this year that are used to living together. I have kept each mare and newborn separate for a few days and re-introduced them to the herd depending on how the mare and foal are doing...I make sure the foal is strong on all four legs...and unfolded. I check to see if the mare is obsessive about the foal. Also I think if the mare has had her foal heat she is in a more balanced state of mind. If there is a particularly dominant mare already out with the herd or one the mare with a new baby does not like, I remove that mare for a couple of days so the new pair can slip back into the herd, then I add the top dog mare back in. It is all about horse psychology and knowing your horses. Some go back in the herd like they never left and others keep their new foal away from the others a couple of days, ocassionally a mare is noticeably uncomfortable with her old pals and I remove her to an adjacent pen until she re acquaints with the group. I notice now that most of the foals are 3-4 weeks old, they are leaving their mothers often to form a sub herd....and no one seems to care. Some of the mares even come in for dinner and leave their foal in the adjacent field. If the foal notices, he comes next to the mare across a pipe fence and waits for mom to finish dinner. I encourage this as it is the start of weaning. By 5 months all parties concerned are used to some separation.
 

Diana Gilger
Breeding Stock
Username: Kdgilger

Post Number: 275
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 - 03:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Great ideas Terry!
 

wanda
Weanling
Username: Wanda

Post Number: 23
Registered: 04-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 - 12:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I read somewhere on here that a gelding almost killed a foal...and not to put them together with a mare and foal...but then someone else on here stated that their gelding is a great babysitter..
here is my ?..and I don't know if any of you have ever dealt with an extremely underweight horse before...so here goes..what would you all experienced horse owners do..I have my Annie that I have talked about on here (percheron pregnant mare) I have seen her with a foal before and she is very protective with them...and I have just rescued a 7yr old quarter horse that is extremely underweight...I have not put them together for 2 reasons..I know that Annie is going to be very aggressive towards him and I don't think he can hold his own right now and if he did I would not want injury to Annie or foal...so when can I or should I ever put them together...I got him thinking he would be a great companion for Annie(and the fact that I would have taken him regardless due to his living conditions) but now I don't know if they will ever be together..they are stalled in the same barn at night but put in different pastures during the day.. any suggestions are welcome!!! I want to make sure I do what is best for all..
 

corina gabel
Yearling
Username: Newyearsbaby05

Post Number: 64
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Thursday, May 01, 2008 - 01:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

you might intro then supervised tell she foals if shes use to him she might be better with with him after the birth. But if you really dont know to much about him i would only do surpervised visits tell the foal is a few weeks old tell hes big enuff to run and get out of the way of a fight. Alot depends on the peronlitys of the two involved! my sud is with our baby sence he was 3 months old! they love each other-the stud is low man in the group!

If you have adiquate pastures that share a fence would be your best bet if you cant turn them out together and sit there and wacth. or maybe your yard for a 15 or 20 mins a day....there wouldnt be a fight for the best grassy spot!

anyways what you feel confortable with you know your mare and how she acts....



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