MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Prolapsed uterus

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Prolapsed uterus « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

AG
Nursing Foal
Username: Tilly

Post Number: 15
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Thursday, June 16, 2005 - 02:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I afraid to ask this question, my mare just suffered a prolapsed uterus when trying to dekiver placenta. She lost a lot of blood but bleeding appears to be stopped, vet thought she would probably go into shock quickly and die, but that was 11 hours ago. She has perked up a tiny bit(taknig interest in foal), is she past the danger zone from shock? Also the vet had to put the uterus back in with tiny little bits of placenta still attached because the uterus was coming away so fast he decided to get it back in quickly and worry about the placenta later. So I am expecting that she will probably get a bout of laminitis (which she is prone to anyway). Apart from these obvious disasters she is in excellent condition. Is it possible that she will recover? Are there other complications to expect?
 

Kim v.
Yearling
Username: Twhgait

Post Number: 59
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Thursday, June 16, 2005 - 06:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi AG, I'm so sorry to read about this. I hope things are continuing to progress for her and she is getting more strength. My thinking is that if she is continuing to stand and taking interest in the baby, maybe she can recover. I would not leave those bits of placenta in her though, she can get very sick fast and laminitis may be the least of it. I'm sure you talked to the vet about flushing out her uterus and he probably told you when would be the best time. I'll say prayers for you both!!
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10156
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Thursday, June 16, 2005 - 08:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Uterine prolapse - complete uterine prolapse - has a survival rate of 50% once the uterus is replaced.

WRT to the pieces of the placenta still attached to the uterus: That is a potentially disastrous situation that needs rectifying immediately. Failure to do so may accomplish what the prolapse didn't - death of your mare.

Bottom line... I think I would be looking to get this mare evaluated by a veterinarian that has a lot of experience with reproduction - preferably a Theriogenologist (which is a veterinarian certified in reproduction). While your mare is still "plugging along", it would be good to get her all the help you can...
 

AG
Nursing Foal
Username: Tilly

Post Number: 17
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Friday, June 17, 2005 - 06:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was nervous going to check on my mare this morning, for fear of what i would see. I was delighted to see that she looked surprisingly great, thank God. The vet was just up again washed her out, he was really delighted with her progress. He said he will wash her out every day until she is clear. is this enough to ensure that all the tiny bits of placenta are removed? He said that they would gradually disintergrate into bloody fluid in the uterus and washing her out would get rid of them. He said that once she washed out clear we could be confident that it was all out and she would be ok again.I think he was sure she would die of blood loss and shock. Do you think her prognosis has improved?

Ps I cant access the latest posts of foalwatch any more. Is that just me?
 

Laurie Ridgeway
Neonate
Username: Lridgeway

Post Number: 3
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2008 - 04:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Rather then start a new thread I figured I'd tag along to the end of this one.

On friday night 11:53 my mare pushed out a beautiful little filly, then a minute later while still laying down, her placenta and then about 1 minute later, her uterus.

My Vet got out there is record time, gave her a epidural (sp) and with much grunting and groaning got her uterus back in and her sewed up (man did he sew her up) and when I asked about the placenta he said it was all out for sure (I also took the placenta to the hosp next day for hops vet to look at). I'm very fortunate to have a Hospital 1 1/2 miles up the road.

We were worried that when she stood up she would hemorage (sp - brain is still mushy) but she didn't and she walked and loaded into the trailer like a pro (I sent someone back for the foal as our concern was getting her to the hospital). Her ears were cold and her membranes were white.

When we got to the hosp. vet couldn't feel or hear pulse but about 1/2 an hour later after fluids her pulse was much stronger.

I haven't had a chance to talk to the hosp. vet again but do read the mares chart when I visit.

She was off fluids and decathater was out on sunday morning, the stitches were out and she was lavaged sunday afternoon and this morning.

She's on Penn, Gentocin, Banamine & oxytocin and a few others that don't look familiar.

She drank that first evening when we let her and wanted to eat as well. They've been careful about feeding her but this morning I noticed her feeder was brimming with food.

As of this morning her temp is still normal, no discharge and no smell.

I know it's a wait and see and i've been very fortunate with the quality of people involved.

She's 20 this year and I'm not interested in breeding her again, she's earned her retirement.

However, I would like to know at what point can I uncross my fingers & toes? i.e. how long before an infection should have set in??

I don't know if it matters but we're very good about keeping the foaling stall clean and her stall had been completely stripped that afternoon and fresh straw put down.

Best regards,

Laurie
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1732
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, June 16, 2008 - 06:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

WOW Laurie~ What a terrible, horrible experience. Thank heavens you were around and the filly is fine and your mare got the BEST care for this situation. I would breath but I will say a prayer for complete recovery for her! and keep those fingers and toes crossed! Hugs for you you must be so weary. Post pics if you can!
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 618
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 01:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Laurie, what an awful ordeal for you and your mare! I know she is getting the best care possible and she is in good hands with you as her owner and the hospital as well.

I hope we keep hearing that there is improvement. I just wanted to send my support. Hope you can squeeze in some sleep.

AG-I am a novice, but it sounds like the vet is doing the right thing. The only thing I can say is Jos is worth listening to. You probably know she hosts this site, has published articles and so on, so if you can do so, I'd follow her advice and find a specialist.

This is scary. My mare is 18. I was reading that they are more likely to have twin pregnancies as they age. Now this is another possible complication. I don't know if prolapse ismore likely in older mares, but it would certainly seem so. More research for me to do.

Anyway, I send you and your mare my support. Please keep us posted.
 

Cathy
Breeding Stock
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 297
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cjskip wrote The only thing I can say is Jos is worth listening to. You probably know she hosts this site, has published articles and so on, so if you can do so, I'd follow her advice and find a specialist.

While I'm sure Jos is very pleased to read that you think highly of his expertise, he may want everyone to know he is indeed male.

(Message edited by cathy on June 20, 2008)
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 620
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, June 20, 2008 - 08:33 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cathy, OPPS! I have made that error before. Thanks for the correction and my sincere apologies to you, Jos!
 

corina gabel
Breeding Stock
Username: Newyearsbaby05

Post Number: 154
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, June 23, 2008 - 06:49 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i think most of us think is just us women up freting about these horses. Most men are like just let nature take its course. Eather way it great to have anyone help us out.



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US