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Take a bow !!!!!!!!!!!

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Take a bow !!!!!!!!!!! « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 25
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 05:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've truely enjoyed posting some of my thoughts and experiences on this board. It has helped me organize my thoughts, and often, is a good way to pass the time while waiting for the next mare to foal.

It is important to point out, however, that I do not do any of this alone. Like any large operation, we delegate many responsibilities and that holds true for our foaling barn. There are 2 guys that are on the front lines of this process and they are, without a doubt, the best there are. Being a foaling person anywhere is no easy task, but here, the pressure is ratcheted-up a few notches, and these guys are ALWAYS up to the task. I am simply on-call for foalings and arrive when she is about 15 minutes from breaking water. It is these guys who wait, watch and worry up until that time, then make the calls. Have you ever tried to predict when a mare is 15 minutes from breaking water? These guys get it right on the nose( or another part of the anatomy) 99.9% of the time. I simply stroll in, grab a cup of coffee(it's always hot) maybe pull a leg here and give a shot there and take all the credit for a job well-done.

I know one of our foaling guys lurks at this site often. Hopefully, he will begin to join a few discussions because when it comes to pin-pointing when a mare is going to foal, he has much to offer.


I have also gained a tremendous amount of respect for those of you who do this alone. I am surrounded by experienced, highly skilled people constantly, always have been. I've never really considered what it would be like to only have myself to rely on as many of you do. My hat's off to you.
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 72
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim: Has anyone told you what an honorable person you are? And you are right...your front line guys are your success as well. You tell those little "lurkers" that we need their expertise as well...pass along some of that knowledge and "little things" that they've learned.

I also have a question...you don't have to answer if you don't want to...but I'm assuming that because of your facility, you are into a specific breed operation? I know that I think its just amazing that you can have such a state-of-the-art facility and foal the quantities you do. Wow! You know, in my neighborhood...having 3-4 mares foaling in a year's time is a "mid-size" operation...giggle!

Having a multi-breed family (TB, Quarter, Paint) I've noticed some distinct differences among them, their body shapes during pregnancy for example, I haven't come to any diffinative answer for myself yet, but still trying to determine if some of those differences could be the breed itself or maybe it's just distinctly different on each mare for just that simple reason.

This is the first time in my life that I have worked with a pregnant TB...and in my case...she is just an odd duck compared to the quarters and quarter-type I've always dealt with. But, maybe that's just her. She always looks like the poor mal-nurished children on the tv commercials late at night. She's not skinny...just that big, low, sway belly thing that hangs on her typical TB lanky frame makes for one incredibly wormy looking creature. Poor thing...don't tell her I said that, she thinks she's beautiful.
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 73
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 06:00 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim's "Lurking" Frontliners: Please come on here and let me know if you have ever had one of your mare's tuck and hold her tail between her legs like a whipped dog before she foals. My mare just started doing this the past two days and short of using a crowbar, she is not going to relax. Really odd behavior considering my other mares relax the backend. She was originally due March 6th...she's had a bag for 5 weeks now...she has been v-d open for 3 weeks...gravity itself should have delivered this foal. As Tim said to me earlier...I believe she's a "clincher"!!!! Now that she's tucking the tail, I believe she is revolting in her way and has decided that maybe she doesn't want to deliver anything that resembles a full grown pony.

Come on in and talk to us. We need your information brains for our group!
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 1
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 06:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Bobbi, I am Tim's little lurker, all 238 pounds of me. I think he knows I plan on asking for a raise soon! HaHa.

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 03, 2008)

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 03, 2008)
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 06:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is she a young mare? If that just started that would get a little extra attention. We just had a maiden 2 nights ago that was 30 days over due. She held her tail down pretty tight until about 1 hour before losing the battle. She still only had a foal that weighed 99 pounds(average seems to be around 122 this year). Some mare need to cook their foals a little longer. We had one here a few years ago that was the opposite. She had healthy, large foal 30 days early every year.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 487
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 07:15 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim,
Bobbi is right!! You are very honorable.

Jonathan,
Welcome to the board!!! I am sure just like Tim you have much to offer us "ametuers". :-)
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1229
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 07:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi there Jonathan and Tim! I think this is great to have you two on this board. And such modesty... I'm looking forward to your posts in the future. It sounds like you both have a ton of experience and expertise. It's wonderful to meet you both.
 

Kim Peavy/ Sweetie 7/3/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Lovemysinbad

Post Number: 148
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 07:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Marilyn....he has arrived just in the nick of time to catch us in our last 3 months, huh!! Yippee....poor Jonathan doesn't know what he's gotten himself into! My mom's TB is a maiden and I know what you are saying about that lanky look with the gut hanging...she shines and looks healthy, but nothing like my QH/Paint (mack truck) Sweetie...she's a real Pork Chop.....but I love her and she looks great to me...has a crease going down her back now and has shedded all winter coat...she is just gleaming and shining with that pregnant glow! Welcome and thanks Tim for sharing!
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1231
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Thursday, April 03, 2008 - 08:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

lol, you got that right Kim, just in the nick of time. I hope we didn't scare them away. lol
 

Lorna Glen /Tosh due 4/19
Yearling
Username: Lornaglen

Post Number: 81
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 12:57 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey Tim and Jonathan, it's so fun to read your posts! Could you give me your input on my mare?

About two weeks ago she was streaming and dripping milk for a couple of days, I even saw her kick at her belly a few times. after a couple of days I didn't see any more dripping.

Here's some pics of her today. Thanks

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii302/lornaglen/ToshaonApr3005.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii302/lornaglen/ToshaonApr3009.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii302/lornaglen/ToshaonApr3007.jpg

http://i267.photobucket.com/albums/ii302/lornaglen/ToshaonApr3004.jpg
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 26
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:27 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lorna

It's not uncommon for a mares bag to flucuate, sometimes it can be extreme, especially with drastic weather changes and an active foal inside. Judging by the pics, it looks as though she's got a bit more progress to make with the size of her bag.

We had a mare do something similar a month or so ago. She progressed quickly, nice bag, wax, so we moved her into a foaling stall. By the time she ended up foaling, she had watched 7 or 8 mares foal before her.

Nice pics though, glad to see someone had decent weather today.


Marilyn

I don't scare too easily. However, by the time this foaling season is over, I will likely be reduced to a babbling idiot who just needs a drink, or a week on the beach, or to drink on the beach for a week.......Crap!...It's already beginning.


Bobbi


I work for a Thoroughbred breeder. I wish I could go into more detail than that, but I can't.

I know what you're saying about the maidens, they can be a worrisome, vexing creature.
We had our last maiden deliver last night, I've lost count, but I think we had 18 or so maidens this year. While this is a cause for for some sort of small celebration, I always enjoy watching these first timers discover what life is REALLY all about.


(Message edited by dystocia on April 04, 2008)

(Message edited by dystocia on April 04, 2008)
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1234
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 08:10 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim, drinks on a beach can cure almost anything that ails you. lol That sounds great to me! In fact, if I'm not able to get both my mares bred this Spring, I think I'll join you. lol Last year was a rough one, to say the least.
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 74
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 12:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Tim & Jonathan: Nice to have you come out and join us!

Jonathan: I don't know what you consider a young maiden, my TB is 5, has the mentality of a weanling though! Poor little babe! She is still exhibiting the tail tucking behavior for day 3 or 4 now...I've lost count. Is it today or tomorrow??? Or maybe just one really looonnnggg day in the foaling period. She had contractions last night and it really bothered her. She was aggravated and antsy but it stopped within an hour. She's been irritated everytime the baby moves throught this pregnancy...its like she can't comprehend what is happening to her. She's super, duper bagged and with each passing day, the tail gets tighter and tighter between her legs. (I've known this mare since she was an hour old...crawled into a warm bathtub with her to save her life...a heart warming story I'll tell someday).
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 62
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 01:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi-would love to hear that story!

About the tail tuck. I guess these mares don't understand that they have it backwards! Good luck with her.
 

Lorna Glen /Tosh due 4/19
Yearling
Username: Lornaglen

Post Number: 83
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 02:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Tim, I'll just keep watching her! Thanks again for being here and sharing what you know. You have great energy and fun humor that comes right through on your posts! Jonathan, you have the same great energy! I know that all those mares are grateful and comforted that they are in your care. Do you get the rest of the year off after foaling season?
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 75
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 02:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim: I didn't mean to imply that I was curious who you worked for, just what breed. I have some dear friends of mine who grew up in KY and his dad was in charge of a breeding barn for Standardbreds. Him and I have shared great stories together. Anyway, the reason I was curious about the breed is that I remember a few years back that there was some type of issue with a disease in the grass or insects or something in which it created havoc among the TB farms in KY. I was just curious what that culprit was and if there has been success in resolving it.

Marilyn: Whew...we must not be too bad, Jonathan and Tim are still up to the challenge

Kim: Hehe...I've got both body styles and they are just a world of difference! I agree...I've got that "porker" quarter too. I push the fat away just to find the spinal column. Gotta love them. My hubby just tells me that he can't relate to my "silly Thoroughbreds"...he loves that I love them but he doesn't appreciate their sometimes complex personalities.

Lorna: Welcome to the waiting game. You're among friends here...hehehe!

Emily: Hey! We're in for a nice, warm, storm-free weekend. Wow...what I luxury. I left strict instructions with my 2 that this would be an appropriate time to push now!

And...just because I am such a great farm "MOM", I wanted to say...I DO have a new baby! At 10:30PM last night, one of my equally overdue heifers gave birth to a beautiful chocolate brown good sized calf. This was the heifer I was worried about as she is quite small (550 lbs) and we have battled back & forth for the past 4 months about getting rid of her prior to calving. We were extremely worried that she could even deliver. Well, she's earned her permanent breeding place on the farm. She did a great job and is an outstanding, patient mother. Poor calf couldn't figure out where the faucet was for about over an hour and mom just kept doing everything but putting it in his mouth for him. So...althought its not my foal "baby" I am tickled that things went well with this maiden. (We have 1 other heifer who is overdue and one of my favorite cows due) Maybe with the start of this babe, we are now on a roll!
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 492
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 02:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yeah, Bobbi!!!! Let's hope this starts a chain reaction for all of us. :-)
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 76
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cjskip: Hi! I think you're right...someone DID forget to tell them its the other way around!

I'll probably get yelled out for telling this story and I'll try to keep it short...its a "foaling lesson" I learned.

Brief background: over 20 years ago, I was deeply involved in the QH racing world...started as an exercise girl/gallop girl and then moved to a jockey. I also just "dabbled" in the TB racing world. Had a horrible incident and got out of it all together. Doesn't have anything to do with my mare, but you need to know where I developed such a great love and respect for these remarkable athletes.

Anyway, 5 years ago, I had a dear friend of mine who breeds and raises TB's go into the hospital with a heart condition. She called me at work and asked if I could go and feed for her because they were keeping her overnight. She had 4 mares due and one was any time now. I said sure...this was in February and I know her mares like they were my own. I got to her farm, it was windy, cold (well below freezing) and pouring rain in buckets. Her foaling stall is situated on the side of her barn. Only one is "open" with a round metal gate. She uses a tarp that pulls closed (like shower curtain)to block that during bad weather. She has found that having an open end for her mares makes them more comfortable as they can see their pasture buddies and reduces their stress. Poor Schooley had given birth fairly recent when I arrived. The problem. she had layed down and birthed by that gate and when she delivered, poor Blossom had just slid under the gate into the thick mud and freezing rain. Mom couldn't get to her and she couldn't get to mom, much less struggle her way up from the slop.

I was sick to my stomach when I first saw them. Down in the mud I went, managed to dig her out of the mud, called the great vet we use on his cell phone, and made my way to the house. Told "David" (the vet): "When you get here, come straight to the bathroom in the house." I'm sure he was like...What?!?!?!

The sight must have been sad because I weigh all of 92 pounds and to drag in this leggy TB filly who had another 100 pounds of mud on her was all I had in me. I managed to get her into the house, half dragging her, filled up the bathtub with luke warm water, jumped in and pulled her in with me and just held in head up in my lap while I kept massaging her body to get the circulation going. I would drain a bit of the water every 5 minutes and add additional hot water, slowly warming it up, until David arrived. The great thing, he jumped in the tub with me and we both worked on her for some time until she was perked up.

We finally got her body temp up and got her dried off and carried her back out to Mom to eat. All went well in the end...we battled with some respiratory issues and some tummy/digestion issues for a short time but she pulled through. (I once got caught again with her when the same friend was on vacation and Blossom decided to colic as a yearling.)

The end of the story: I never owned her in the beginning but she has crossed my path too many times. She raced as a 2 year old and then again as a 3 year old, not placing much with a 2nd being her best. I stumbled across her new owner when I was doing a deal on a "retired" gelding. Who told me to come see who she had in her barn. That mare nickered at me and knew immediately who I was. That was it...broke my heart. "Dawn" runs a successful racing barn and has ALOT of horses...she said, "Bobbi, she has a big heart but she just doesn't like this racing. You need to buy her and take her home to just "be a horse." So I did...one little stickler...she was already paid up to race on July 4th. So, we were going to pick her up the 5th and "Dawn" invited us to the owner's box to watch her final race. She broke her maiden that day and I proudly stood in the winner's circle with my long time friend as she left the world she was bred to be in and came home with an "old friend" to be "just a horse".

Sorry so long.

Lesson to be learned: If you have "gaps" in your foaling stalls that may lead to this problem. Put straw bales against those areas so that no one can "slide" under.
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 27
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi-what a great story! Sounds like she was ment to be your from the start. Thank you for sharing it and your love of these wonderful animals we have the pleasure of sharing our lives with.

Michelle
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1235
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:21 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I loved your story Bobbi, I wanted to cry! You're a great story teller. I'm glad the story had a happy ending. :-)
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 493
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

What a touching story, Bobbi!!!!
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 80
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Michelle & Marilyn: Thanks for the compliment. I apologize to everyone that it was such a loonnng post. Its not that I'm a great story teller but that the horses we all own have a great story to tell.

People in my equine circle of friends are often baffled by my "assortment" of horse choices. hahaha...but really, haven't we ALL chosen the mares that we have based on something we see in them or how they have touched our lives or maybe its not that they have a "perfect confirmation" or that they "come from a long line of great champions"...maybe its just that little something in their eye that only we can see that makes them great.

Good lands...speaking of bloodlines...but my poor TB's great grandaddy would be kickin' her lanky tb behind all over the place if he knew that her thoughts about what she was bred to do was...."naaawwww...I think I want to be just a walker...not a runner" hehehehe...I guess even the GREATS throw a "dud" once in awhile...hahaha. (Just kidding...no disrepect intended.)
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 81
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 03:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily: FINGERS CROSSED...PLEASE LET US HAVE BABIES THIS WEEKEND WHILE ITS PRETTY OUT...FINGERS CROSSED

(And yes, I know its in all caps and yes, I am shouting now
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 4
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi

Watch her close at about the same time tonight. Most mares we have that show strong signs then back off will foal the following night about the same time. Not always, but quite often.

Five is about the age of most of our maidens so she is still only a young teenager in horse years.
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 5
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 04:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Lorna

Do you need a foal watch person. I need some nice weather. All of this rain is driving me crazy.

As for after foaling season, I spend the rest of the year helping keep the herd safe at night. I never have been a morning person. Except for going to sleep at 5am. You have to love a job where you get to play with the new foals in the winter and walk around under the stars in the summer. DON'T TELL TIM!
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 27
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 05:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi

Ahhh yes, the infamous MRLS (mare reproductive loss syndrome)year, 2001. It was caused by the Eastern Tent Catapiller (ETC). There are some good resources available on-line for the particulars, but in short, the mares would eat the catapillers, and the hairlike spines on them would lodge in thier digestive tract causing the mare to abort or re-absorb.

It was a bad year to say the least. Early on, even before we knew exactly what was going on, the correlation was made between the amount of exposure to the ETC's and the rate of loss. We were some of the lucky one's who were able to leave our breeding stock in the barns for most of the day. Other breeders, large and small, simply did not have the stall space to safely protect all of thier animals, so alot of horses simply shipped out of the area or aborted. Several friends lost thier jobs, or lost a large percentage of thier hope and dreams for that year and the next. The financial impact on the local industry was staggering.

We always have a few ETC's, but that year was like something out of a Hitchcock film. They were EVERYWHERE!!!!! Evidently, the spring weather patterns lined-up just perfectly for a bumper-crop of these little boogers.

(Message edited by dystocia on April 04, 2008)
 

Catherine Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: Cateowen

Post Number: 126
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

To all those that are on Foal Watch:

God Bless Each And Everyone of You!
You are Angels!

As someone who has tried on several occassions to "birth her own babies", I turn into an absolute basketcase and end up making my poor mares so nervous I know they just wish the aliens would beam me up so I'd get out of the picture.

I send my mares off to foal at a farm with 24-hour watch and vet. It gives me peace of mind that people that do this daily for a living are on watch and that vet assistance is very close-at-hand if needed.

I just doctor myself with ample amounts of tequila and wait on the phone to ring.

---I know my mares are grateful to you to!
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1098
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, wonderful story! I could just imagine you and the vet in a bathtub with a newborn foal
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 29
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 08:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jon, about that raise. I've noticed lately that you've been spending more company time on the internet. We'll have to talk...HaHa

I'm here til Saturday folks...Don't forget to tip your bartenders and waitresses.
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 30
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 04, 2008 - 08:23 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim-

I have so enjoyed your posts. I was hoping that I could ask you a question. I have a Aqha mare who we have had some pretty severe problems with diahrrea earlier in her pregnancy. We ran all the bloodwork (everything came back normal no Salmonella or anything else). Our vet had us treat her with Biosponge and that worked well. She had caslicks placed after her AI. We were planning on removing them at 300 days (301 today) but our vet wants to wait 2 more weeks. I trust my vet but it still makes me nervous. Any opinion?
Thanks!!

Michelle
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 30
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 01:03 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'd say, continue to trust your vet. He/She should be able to weigh the risk against where this mare is in her pregnancy. If something changes (bag, behavior, body shape) insist that it be done now.


I don't open any caslicks until the mare breaks water. What can I say, I've always been a procrastinater...... Plus, this is an ideal time because the vulva is fully relaxed meaning you can do a better job of opening her completely, it is more sanitary, and seems to be somewhat less painful as compared to those I've seen opened several weeks before foaling. The only drawback to waiting until the last minute is that they MUST be watched closely 24/7.
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 33
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 07:53 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Tim I appreciate your opinion.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 498
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 12:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim and Jonathan, If you would be willing to humor one more of us "expectant" mothers I would love to have your opinion. :-)
This is Gracie. She is a maiden and is at day 336. She started getting an udder between day
300-305. About a week ago it stopped getting any bigger and got softer. Now it is starting to get hard again. She has no milk whatsoever.

Her rump is very soft and "rubbery". Her vulva is swelling but mostly at night and it appears to be more of a normal size during the day. Today though it is still swollen. She has her uncomfortable moments but nothing lasts long. I check on her throughout the day and do a thorough check at night. I have a camera so I wake up and watch her often. Here are some pictures from today.
Oh, she is 8 and we have been trying for a foal since she was 3.

Side
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie336.jpg

Udder
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie336U.jpg

Tailhead
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie336R.jpg

I can post a picture of her vulva if needed but photobucket usually deletes them. :-)

Thanks for looking!!!
 

Lorna Glen /Tosh due 4/19
Yearling
Username: Lornaglen

Post Number: 86
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 02:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jonathan, I would love a foal watch person! When can I fly you out? So great to hear you describe how you love what you do there!

I really think you guys should write a book!
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 33
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 04:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Geeze Lorna, don't tempt him like that. especially not tonight. We've got 3 waxed-up, 1 waxed and walking, and 1 more who just wants to kill us. Actually, a plane ticket sounds pretty good right about now.

Emily,

I'll try to look at your pics when I get a break. And yeah, photobucket doesn't appreciate the scientific value of good horse porn.
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 6
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 07:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Be there monday Lorna!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Tim I quit! You can foal out all of them by yourself!
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 7
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 08:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily

Just going by the pictures it appears that she has a little way to go. The best thing about maidens is that usually they are pretty honest. The foal seem to still pretty high and her bag should get a bit bigger. If it is a nice warm and sunny day most mares will soften around the tail and vulvas will relax. Especially if your weather has been as nasty as ours has been.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 501
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 05, 2008 - 08:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for your imput. :-)
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 34
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 07:14 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Busy night last night. 3 VERY nice colts though. The first 2 were textbook foalings, the third took a bit more work. He is a big, well-developed dude with a broad chest, deep girth, and powerful hindquarters. Good muscle and bone too, I really like this one!!!!! I like his mom too, she's tough, even downright dangerous at times, but if you respect her space, play by the rules and appreciate her for what she is ( a fantastic broodmare!!!) she may just cut you a break from time to time. She certainly gave her all tonight!!!!! Great, great mare.
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 37
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 08:30 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Congrats Tim on 3 more sucessful births! I sure wish I could have you here when my mare gives birth!!(ever thought of vacationing in North Carolina during foaling season?) haha

Michelle
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1243
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 08:41 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim & Jonathon, sounds like you had quite an eventful night. Were you happy to get colts or do they prefer fillies? I wish I could see pictures of your new arrivals,especially the third one. I would love to see him, he sounds spectacular. But I'm sure you're not able to, but it would be cool to see them.

Jonathon, after your visit with Lorna, you can come to my place, but you might be bored, I only have 3 mares. lol

Tim, what feed do the pregnant mares get and how much? I have two TB mares, one pregnant and one that's going to be bred this next month.

My TB mare that's 7 1/2 months pregnant, gets a 3 1/4 (two cup measure) of Purina Omelene 200 and 2 flakes of alfalfa and 2 flakes of grasses hay. I'm planning on increasing that to 3 1/2 to 4 cups very soon, since it will be the last 3 months of her delivery. Does that sound about right to you? She is 15.3 hands tall and weighs about 1200 lbs. She is a big boned mare. Do I need to increase the alfalfa too?

Thanks in advance for your imput
Marilyn
 

Lorna Glen /Tosh due 4/19
Yearling
Username: Lornaglen

Post Number: 91
Registered: 09-2007
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 09:55 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim and Jonathan, I think I'm going to the beach and have a drink for you guys! Even though I don't drink! How many mares are in your care during a typical season? I'm glad the mare you're describing has you there for her. You obviously understand her. She sounds awesome!

Wow 3 in one night, I hope they staggered the times a little. Based on your experience, is there an average time of day or night foaling happens? I keep hearing middle of the night or early morning, seems varied according to the posts here.

You guys are inspiring!
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 83
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello everyone: I posted my wonderful news on birth announcements...got two within 24 hours. (I guess it just took my little heifer to get the maternity ball rolling...one a day, just like vitamin!)

Tim/Jonathan: I need your help and I need some education about some issues. I will apologize for the long posts but I'm hoping that it will help others who have maidens and may have the same questions/concerns.

Disaster struck Friday for my Echo. All was well at 2:30PM, my hubby and I left for a tax appointment, had dinner, returned at 6:30PM. We drove up to the maternity field, found our stallion in the field! He had run through 2 sets of fencing to get there! (He has never done this before!) Needless to say, he was cut from head to toe. We knew something was up then (talk about a foaling sign!) We removed him but everyone was already in a tizzy. We found Echo on a hillside quietly nursing her colt. Baby was dry and alert and fine. Problem: Poor mom is just ripped from bottom to udder. Tail soaked in blood, backlegs soaked in blood and swollen out of this world. (I don't outwardly panic but inside I was like OMG!) Called the vet because we could not find the placenta. Found it later and that concern was eliminated. He is not concerned about this tear, says nothing we can do about it just will have to heal. I'm trying to understand that. This is my first maiden and I have never seen this in my experienced mares. This mare never got "loose" and was a pretty small mare anatomically in the vulva area. She never V'd and I am just shocked. Do they not stitch up these mares when they tear like that because of the risk the will tear again on the next foal? We have her on some 1GM Bute 2X Day and 30cc Penicillin. He is having me wash the "outside" of the area with betadine scrub to help minimize dirt. My gosh but I just feel like there should be something else I can do to help with the swelling and uncomfortableness. Can you help explain why I am so worried when my vet (whom I really respect) isn't?
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 84
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi All: Sorry...I have another maiden experience to share and another question for anyone who may be able to help.

Blossom, my TB, foaled yesterday. As I said in the birth announcement, she was stellar and amazing in her maiden voyage. She has been my cranky one lately (normally she wants to warm and fuzzy with humans). As I was medicating Echo, her water broke. The minute her water broke, the "water balloon" appeared. She turned and gave me shout and started walking over to the fence to get to me. I must say, I normally let my mares do their own thing. I watch but respect their privacy and only intervene if there is a problem. Oh no...not with this mare, she was frantically pacing and wanting ME to comfort her. I went into the field and she trots up to me..poor baby bubble is getting larger now. I comforted her and tried to walk away to give her some space but she was determined that we were in this together. I stroked her head and talked with her and within seconds she was down (mom's here and I feel better now..hehe). Baby had one front leg complete exposed but with each relaxation between contractions, she would suck the entire thing back in. Each contraction would bring just the one full leg out. It didn't take but a few contrations for me to figure out we have a little issue. Out came the ob gloves and during the next relaxation I went fishing, the other leg was bent at the knee. I waited until the next contraction had subsided and then took the opportunity to give a little shove on the knee and grab the hoof when it flexed and just hung on to it. On the next relation I gently put steady pressure on the hoof and the second leg straitened. Once that happened, the next contraction brought out both legs and half the head. Here's the humor...with each relaxtion through this whole process, she would suck that foal all the way back in! It was like..oh, its here, oh, its gone. She struggled with being able to pass the head & shoulders due to the "cock-eyed" position baby was in...delivering sideways with one leg over its head and one leg twisted under (like he was making an "X" with his head in between). My mare kept wanting to roll up on her belly because she was wanting me to comfort her. She wanted people up at her head coaching her. My daughter intervened and the minute she stroked her head and neck, talking to her, she laid back, relaxed, I hung on to both legs to keep baby from being sucked back in. (I was extremely careful not to pull...just kept enough pressure that we would make a little progress with each contraction). Three contractions later I had baby out. The struggle I had with this delivery is that it took over 3 hours to get this baby to nurse, at which point he was so hungry that he was frantic. Not because mom wouldn't let him but the poor child could not find the refrigerator! I would work with him to help point him in the direction and then back off to let nature take its course. I did this once an hour to help. Finally, when I was getting seriously concerned I propped his little butt against my thighs and basically trapped him in position. He finally looked up and discovered the faucets. Good lands but he had sucked on every other portion of her body I can't believe he had this much trouble. My husband says he's not the brightest lightbulb in the packet. But he is such the sweetest thing you'd ever meet.

Question: He has one eye that is extremely swollen, almost shut, came out of mom like that. Did he just qet squished? Its red and irritated. I can't tell if its the actual eye that is swollen or just the membranes and lid. He only has it open a little slit. I managed to kind of pry the lid open a little more and it appears to be a different color than the other eye. The one eye is a healthy brown, this eye almost has a bluish color to it. The iris is clear, there doesn't seem to be any cloudiness in it and because they are outside in the sun, I wasn't able to tell pupil response very well. Do I possibly have a sight problem?

Thanks to everyone for allowing my long posts and giving me the opportunity to express my experience.

To all you maiden voyagers out there...sorry...but neither one of my mares gave me ANY pending foaling signs. Just...bam...there they were. I did not have waxing (just minor off and on for about a week), I did not have dripping milk-in fact, it took a few hours for colostrum to drop after foaling. There was no pacing, there was no restlessness, no one ever went off their feed, one was soft in the tail for about 2 weeks prior to foaling, one never got soft in the tail. One went 2-1/2 weeks past the typical 340 days, and the other one I wasn't sure about but am certain now that she was 10 days early from her 340 days.
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 70
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 02:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi-Wow! What an experience! I'm glad your mare and foal came through it and that you were able to be there for the delivery. I suppose if you hadn't been, there may have been a different outcome? Jeeeezzzz-makes me want to invest in a camera system. I'll probably be sleeping outside when my mare gets closer! Anyway, Congrats!!! And thank-you for sharing it with us.

Of course, I have nothing to offer about the eye. I'll be interested in what others post. Hope it turns out well.
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 71
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 02:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi-my gosh, you have had quite a day! Wow! I have nothing to offer, except my heartfelt support. What an experience! I'm glad your mares and foals came through it and hope your stallion recovers well. I am very surprised the vet didn't stitch up your mare's vulva, but I have no idea if that is normal or not. I'm sure some of the more experienced can answer that.

Your maiden delivery was something to read and I am grateful you took the time to outline it for us novices. So glad that you were able to be there for the delivery. I suppose if you hadn't been, there may have been a different outcome? Jeeeezzzz-makes me want to invest in a camera system. I'll probably be sleeping outside when my mare gets closer! Anyway, Congrats!!! And thank-you for sharing it with us.

Of course, I have nothing to offer about the eye. I'll be interested in what others post. Hope it turns out well.
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 38
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 02:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi- My goodness what a day. Congats!! I am so glad that everything turned out well. Thanks so much for the stories. I have been reading everything I can get my hands on about the birthing process and trying to get myself ready for anything that might happen (like the leg problem you experienced). This is the beauty of this site. I don't know of anywhere else like this place. Anyway (ramble) good luck on getting advise about your colts eye, I hope all will be well.

Michelle
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 72
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 06, 2008 - 02:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi-I just read your April 4th post. Thank-you for telling that amazing story! And the advise is appreciated by the many who read this, I'm sure. Wonderful that you two are together now and she has such a great home. If she had raced better in the beginning, I imagine you wouldn't have her now? So glad it all turned out as it did.

 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 86
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 12:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Baby #2 is not well. Mother #1 is not doing well.

Thank you all for your support and nice words. I'm not trying to be a board "hog", just wanting to pass along my experience with all of you that are in the same situation.

I'm not understanding at all why we did not stitch up the mare. I have an appointment with the vet today at 2:45 because I'm just trying to comprehend this situation.

Echo can not urinate correctly. I'm really concerned that this has damaged the urinary tract as well. You know, I've been with these mamas for weeks now and it just goes to show you that you can't always be there when the time comes. Who would have thought a tax preparation appointment would be such a pain. I am still trying to figure out how this happened. I don't know if she went breach...I don't know if she was delivering and my stupid stallion was trying to breed her at the same time...or just where the damage came from and I'll never know. Baby is doing great, bright and healthy.

Baby #2: Affectionately now knows as "Moose" (He's my little buddy and I am soooo attached to this little guy...how can you not when he comes over and lays down in your lap...awww)is not doing well. Mommy lets him nurse fine but he only takes a few swallows and then lays down. He will sleep for hours, not feeding like he should. His half brother eats 3-4 times in the time he takes to eat once. We're also battling some constipation with him (I think...mom licks that area all the time so I'm not sure if she's cleaning it off or if he's not going). My other concern...I have yet to see him urinate. I can't stand out with him 24/7 (would love to but life goes on) but I find it odd. He's just not very perky. We was more alert the day he was born than what he was yesterday.

I'm keeping good thoughts for all of you in your exciting foaling. I can't wait to hear from each and everyone of you when your babies hit the ground! (It's such a wonderful thing no matter how many you have in a lifetime! Each one is a treasure.)
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 90
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 01:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

To All my Maiden Buddies: Check out the second posting on birth announcements...see Blossom in the background in the field...she foaled 20 minutes later after that picture was taken. Am I nuts are where are the foaling signs??!! Hahaha!

Also, Moosse's eye swelling has gone down. He can see out of it. Must have been squished/trauma during birth. The whites of his eyes are bright red from the bursting of capillaries. He must have watched his own delivery instead of closing his eyes!
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 42
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 01:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi-
I am so sorry about all that is going on. I am glad that you keep posting it is a great tool for everyone to hear these stories and learn from the successes as well as the challanges. My thoughts are with you as they have been from the start. Please keep me posted.

Michelle
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 91
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 01:50 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Michelle. I am just sick with worry. I hate it when my "gut" talks to me. Something is wrong. And don't tell my baby #1, but baby #2 has my heart wrapped around his little hoof and it will be a tough one if he doesn't pull through.
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 92
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 01:57 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim/Jonathan: If you could give me directions...I will sneak across states, creep into the barn, club you (only lightly to cause minor unconciousness) and kidnap you to the farm to deal with all this stress!!! Look at it this way, 2 mares/2 foals...would be like a vacation for your two! Not having to worry and stress...hey, a vacation for me too!

Congrats to you both on the weekend of success!

(My husband says these silly TB's look like baby moose when they're born...he told me good thing we don't live in Minnesota...someone would get them confused and shoot them during hunting season...yea...he thinks he's funny!)
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1110
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 02:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I've been busy all weekend and have been trying to catch up on all the posts, Bobbi you have been busy! I don't know about mare #1 and it sounds like the vet is coming out so that's good. The concern I have with foal #2 is that it took him 3 hours to nurse which probably means he did not get enough antibodies and if they don't get enough they can go downhill FAST! My last foal didn't nurse right away and had to have a plasma transfusion within 48 hours. I would have your vet out ASAP to check your foal. Fingers crossed :-)
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 94
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 02:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Tracy: The only positive I have is that I was able to give him a nice dose of Foal Response as soon as he was born to stimulate his appetite. You know, it is so hard to judge when to intervene and when to not. You want to let nature take its course but he just couldn't find it! I kept intervening every 1/2 hour and kept pointing him in the right direction and then would back off and watch from afar. My mare was not rejecting him at all, he just couldn't figure it out! Keep your fingers crossed for me.
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1249
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 02:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, I hope the vet comes out soon to give you a hand with your foal. That's so scary. The mare's problems are scary too. I hope she will recover quickly.

My thoughts and prayers are with you.
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 35
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 03:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi:

Re: The mare (forgot her name, sorry) It sounds like you probably have the vet out there as I'm typing. I've seen them get torn-up pretty bad too, the vets never seem to be as concerned as I am. Usually just use NSAIDS and keep them clean until the swelling goes down, then perhaps a stitch or 2.


Re; The Moose. 3 hrs is not terribly long, I usually like to see them nursing well within 2. Looking at the whole picture though, it seems like you are on to the constipation, which is probably the cause for all that ails this little one. We call it " sh** for brains", they just can't seem to figure how to nurse very well when if they haven't released enough meconium yet. At this stage though it begins to become more serious, watch him closely.

Good luck.

Tim
 

Jonathan Smith
Neonate
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 10
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 04:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi
Sorry I won't give you directions. The last time I was in Missouri was for basic training at Fort Leonard Wood. I had enough bumps and bruises from that visit. Not a pleasant experience!

I hope all your horses do well. Sorry for the slow responses. We both have sundays off.

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 07, 2008)
 

judy cervantes
Breeding Stock
Username: Judy1

Post Number: 291
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 04:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim and Jonathan,i have been reading the post and hope i can ask you a question or 2 if you dont mind,i have a foal that is 8 days old and was born 19 days early,his leggs where pretty bowed in when he was born they seem to be getting better but i have noticed after he has been on them a little while they seem to bow more,his left is worse than the right and now he has a little limp on the lft side,my vet said it will take a little time for them to get stronger and they have, but now i worry about his limp,have you had any experience with this type of thing??Thank you for any information you might have.
 

Jonathan Smith
Nursing Foal
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 11
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 04:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Marilyn Lemke:

Tim is busy for a few hours so I will answer your question.

Our pregnant mares are few 3 to 4 quarts of 12% sweet feed twice a day for the last trimester. All horses are given free choice alfalfa. Any mare that is a hard keeper may receive an extra feeding of 2 to 3 quarts. Nursing mares receive 3 to 4 quarts with the same free choice hay.

I need to add that this plan is set up on our current situation. Your fields may not have the same forages and mineral content as ours. So you have to set your feeding schedule up based on your specific conditions. When I working in Tx. our pregnant mares received 4 to 6 quarts twice daily because of less nutrients in the grass.

Good luck and hope I answered your question.

Jon

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 07, 2008)
 

judy cervantes
Breeding Stock
Username: Judy1

Post Number: 292
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 05:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hi tim and johnathan,here is a picture of chenoa,what do you think of his front legs??
http://i241.photobucket.com/albums/ff140/judycervantes/002-7.jpg
Do you think they will staighten up in time??
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1253
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Monday, April 07, 2008 - 06:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you very much Jon, that is a huge help. You're very sweet. :-)
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 36
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 12:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Judy,

I think you will see pretty drastic improvements with a bit of time, and time alone, however, there are several things you may want to consider.

Stall rest: If he is favoring that left front, he is either in a bit or pain, or the toe-out at the fetlock isn't allowing the foot to break-over properly. The difference between the left and right is the angular deformity at the fetlock in the left leg, from what I can see in the pictures.
As the knees straighten ( and they should with time), this will become less pronounced, but it still may need a bit of management in the future. At any rate, some stall rest may help give him a break from time to time.


A good farrier: There are plenty of very mild and painless things that can be done when these little ones are this young. Therapeautic trimming and glue-on extension shoes can have a profound effect on the young, developing bones and joints.
 

judy cervantes
Breeding Stock
Username: Judy1

Post Number: 295
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 12:40 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you tim,i have not yet let them out in the pasture and the mare is getting restless,i watched him tonight and he seems better,he only moves when he wants to and thats for short sprints and then he will sleep.do you think it would be to much for him to go out to pasture 1-2 hrs aday??its just a gate away?When should i consider therapeautic trimming and extension shoes??Thank you for taking the time to answer my questions.
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 37
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 12:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Turn-out: As long as his mom will stay with him, and the area is not too large, I would think it will be OK. Probably best check with your vet first though as I have only seen pictures.

Farrier: I think just about any time now, even if it's just for a consultation and to formulate a plan.

Gotta go, 'nuther foalin'
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 77
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 01:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, hope things get better real soon.

Tim, that really surprises me about the mares not being stitched up. I learn something new on this board everyday. Hope you foalings are going well.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1115
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 03:47 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim, my last foal that needed the plasma transfusion wouldn't nurse at first and I waited less than three hours before calling my vet and he gave me an ass chewing! He said I should of called him if the foal wasn't nursing by a little over an hour (I had always read 2 hours so that's why I waited). So, what is the protocol? After going thru the whole transfusion thing I would be calling my vet before 3 or more hours went by, is that not the usual standard and my vet is just paranoid?
 

Tim Popovitz
Weanling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 38
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 05:24 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Our nursing protocols are:

first 2 hrs. they are on thier own.

2 hrs. we give a bit of guidance.

3 hrs. we give them a bottle.

4 hrs. on the phone to the vet.


This is a rough guidline. Of course there are plenty of exceptions. At 2 hrs. we try to determine a reason WHY they are not nursing yet. Sometimes they just need to poop a bit more, if this is the case, we give them a second enema and this "fixes" a large percentage of them. The enema goes in, the poop comes out, thier IQ raises 50 points and they are nursing like a pro.

When we get to 3 hrs. without nursing, it is time to consider that there may be something serious going on. We will usually offer a bottle to them, either of the mares collected colostrum or donor colostrum. If they take the bottle fairly quickly, we know that he/she may just be a little "slow" and we will continue working with them to nurse the mare and giving them a bottle. Most of these end up being just fine after they've gotten a bottle and figured out how everything works.

However, If they don't take the bottle, we're probably headed for trouble, either a possible DUMMY FOAL or a more serious meconium impaction. At 4hrs. I'm on the phone to the vet, sometimes sooner, if I think we're headed in the wrong direction.

There are other cases where a foal is unable to stand long enough to "practice" nursing because of a serious contraction or angular deformity. These little guys will likely get a bottle sooner than the 3 hr mark to help get thier strength up.
 

judy cervantes
Breeding Stock
Username: Judy1

Post Number: 296
Registered: 12-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 10:25 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim thank you,the pasture is small so the mare cant get to fare ,the farrier will be here soon,thank you for your help.Glade you are here!!!!
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 95
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Awwwww...sleep is such a wonderful thing!

Good news...Mommy #1 (Echo) is beginning to heal up. Having some issues with urine scald but a nice thick layer of vasoline is helping protect the area. We will do some minor surgery to remove scar tissue when she heals as there was some damage to the urethra. Nice regiment of antibiotics, good cleaning, a little pain & inflamation drugs and a nice does of ace everyday to help her tolerate a deep cleaning is doing the trick.

Little "Moose" passed his IGg test...which brings us to the "Dummy Foal" comment Tim made. I learned that new term yesterday. Razzed my vet about making fun of my TB baby when he said we may be dealing with a dummy foal issue. I had never heard this before. He states that although they don't really know...they suspect that some babies possibly get oxygen deprived during delivery and it can make them "slow learners." Great...he's handicapped before he ever runs his first race

But, he's getting there, he's just taking a day or two longer than Mr. Smarty Pants foal. As we relieved the stress by getting a good antibody test back, we reflected on poor Moose. Dr. Chris, prior to the test, asked me how much money I wanted to spend on this little guy. My response was: Baby #1 is probably by far my better looking foal...but Baby Moose has my heart. (Which means we go the distance. Emotions do contradict our business decisions sometimes. That's why horses keep me poor!) Well, we didn't have to do an enema because during the blood draw (and he was a really good baby through this) he took the time to empty his bowels compliments of my shirt sleeve. Never been so happy to be poo'd on!

Upon reflecting on the two foals, I mentioned that my poor long legged/big shouldered/big hipped baby was sure awkward and lanky compared to round-hipped proportional 1/2 brother. Dr. Chris shockingly said, "No...he's not out of your paint stallion is he? He's all Thoroughbred." I said, "Yep he is." His response: "Well someone forgot to tell him that." In fact, he said, "He's a quality baby. He will excel in racing if confirmation has anything to do with it. He's a keeper."

Tim: You are so right...within an hour after the poo came out...he actually started nursing with a vengence and for the first time in these couple of days, he accidently discovered the canter. Perked right up...clumsy little chap but he's getting there.

Just goes to show you...no two mommas are the same and comparing foal to foal doesn't work so well either.


We ended with we don't really think my baby is a dummy foal...we just think that because he is sooo tall and long legged, he couldn't anatomically figure out he has to kneel to get to the juice. He now kneels on one front leg and has figured out this is the most comfortable for getting into position. Tim, I appreciate you mentioning that in your response. Its nice for all of us to learn that maybe its not the lack of figuring out how to nurse but just the awkward position some of the taller babies have to learn in order to get the mission accomplished.
 

Bobbi Govro
Yearling
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 96
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 12:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jonathan: You are not a good sport hiding from us! Haha! Boot camp...foaling barn...what's the difference?!?! Since you already know where Fort Leonardwood is...you could easily get to my barn and Emily's barn. We wouldn't mind a bit.

And hey...if you and Tim both have Sunday's off...who's watching the barn??? Or do you just leave strict instructions for your mares that they CANNOT foal on that day?!?! If so, we'd all like to know that trick!
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 79
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 03:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We should all just satellite our foal watch camera views to Johnathan and Tim. They could call us (collect-of course) when the time is near, and could guide us via this board, through any complications!
 

Marilyn Lemke - Dora due 7/31/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Marilyn_l

Post Number: 1255
Registered: 06-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 03:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

lol... I'll bet they'll jump on that one. lol It would be nice though. :-)
 

Jonathan Smith
Nursing Foal
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 12
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 04:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cjskip

Sorry we can't help that much. We have had 7 in the last 3 days and still have 40 to go. This season seems to be lasting forever!

Bobbi

Glad to hear everyone in going to be fine. Before long you will have a thoroughbred foal teaching the other all of the tricks in the book. A little warning dummy foal = trouble maker! All that extra attention will get you a little hellraiser, but you will love him all the more for it.

As for the sundays off. We leave the barn in the hands of Joe "The Goober". He is one of the people that has helped train us. He has more years foaling in this barn than both of us combined. He's really good at his job just don't tell him I said so. I have never met a person with more patients with a new foal than him. Several years ago he managed to get a foal with a Wry nose on the bag. That is a lot of work. He taught the foal to stand behind the mare and reach around to nurse from the rear. I was truely impressed with that one.

Please forgive any spelling or grammar errors!

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 08, 2008)
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 516
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 04:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, I am so glad everyone is doing better!!
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 102
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 05:22 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for everyone's happy thoughts...I'm sure that helped me through this.

I think we should all go and bring drinks to the great "foaling barn in KY"...I mean, Tim, Jonathan & Goober would be the entertainment for the evening.

Thanks for the warning about dummy foals. How can you help yourself though??? Poor things just grow on you. Hey...I've heard that some of the best have been trouble makers. My husband thinks ALL my TB's have been trouble makers. He just doesn't appreciate their complex personalities and the nature of the beast. My best rides have been on top of them...unfortunately, some of my worst as well

I AM relieved. I told my vet yesterday that I was not having fond foaling times. If my barn would have been completed, things would have been better. Dr. Amber laughed at me and said, "Oh no...it just brings a whole other set issues."
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 103
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 05:24 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, little "dummy foal" accidently learned to gallop this morning. Shocked the heck out of himself and it was not the most graceful two strides I've ever seen.

Come to think of it...mommy...who I wrote the foaling story about...was probably a dummy foal as well. He may just get it honestly!
 

Terry Waechter 5 march foals
Breeding Stock
Username: Watchman

Post Number: 220
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 06:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

we had a dummy filly a few years ago that spent her first week in the ICU unit at the vet.....nevertheless she went on to become the National Hunter Futurity Champion....you can never tell...
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 106
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 06:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks Terry for inspiration! We'll just keep our dummies won't we

I'm impressed that so many people know that term. In all my years I had never encountered it. Wow...I must have been living under a rock!
 

Michelle Richardson
Weanling
Username: Carefreemom

Post Number: 43
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 08, 2008 - 07:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi- Been trying to finish our foaling barn so I have been gone for a little while (i'm addicted to this site) so I was so glad to hear that your mommas and babies are doing so much better. I have been keeping positive thoughts!

We are slowly progressing at 305 days!

Michelle
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 81
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 12:07 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Awwww Shucks, Johnathan-I thought I had a great solution for us all!!! Ha Ha! I do hope you all knew I was kidding.
 

Laurie A Beltran
Breeding Stock
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 119
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 08:52 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi,
You mentioned Fort Leonardwood?? MO?? OMG! That brings back many memories! I was stationed there in 1979 and boy back then it was Misery! Hot HUMID! I couldn't wait to leave! I thought I would die from the thick air!????

How do you survive there, with horses???
 

Jonathan Smith
Nursing Foal
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 15
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 09:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Laurie

Ft. Lostinthewoods, Misery. You had love waking up with a temp of 40 and 3 hrs later 90 with 100% humidity.

Cjskip

We love kidders. Me and Joe make Tim laugh most nights. The others he just shakes his head and leaves!!!
 

Laurie A Beltran
Breeding Stock
Username: Prophecy_ranch

Post Number: 120
Registered: 07-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 11:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jonathan,
Oyeah! Don't forget that great bivwack food!!!!!!! MMMMM :-(
Try showering then going outside just to want to go back in! How can I forget all those running experiences where they made "ME" carry the flag, because if they didnt I would be the last one in!!!!!!!!!!!

OK enough of my lovely experiences in my younger years!

Take care Jonathan and thanks for all your words of wisdom and experiences!
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 110
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 11:46 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh aren't you all just so funny!

Laurie & Jon: You are sooo right! It's 32 degrees this morning and by this afternoon its supposed to be 68. Its a wonder that our horses don't have chronic respiratory problems! It certainly about kills us humans!

Surviving Missouri with horses: Feed and water REALLY early in the morning so you don't die from the humidity if you have to carry something.

When dealing with horse behavior issues or riding those first-timers...do it when its August and 120 degrees & 100% humidity...they won't fight you then. In fact, they will be happy to oblige your requests.

Winter stinks. Its not much different than summer...75 one day, -20 and 4 foot of ice the next.

Fly control...impossible...we don't know what fly control is in Missouri. We just accept them as stablemates.

A day in the life of a Missouri horse: Wake up, eat, take the winter blanket off, break the ice in the stall buckets, turn out for the day, amble over to the fence all hot and sweaty, request owner to hose you off so you can get cool, come in for supper at 5:30, whew-the night air is really chilly when the sun goes down, eat, get winter blanket back on for evening stall time. Start process all over again.

That's why are horses shed in in cycles. Hot day-shed alot, cold the next day-whoops hang on to whatever winter hair you got. They are bald in the summer and look like lost world mammoths in the winter.

I like your interpretation of the our lovely central army base!
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 519
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 01:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, you are so funny!!!! You explained Missouri so well. :-) There are things here that a love, like our gorgeous creek until it turns into the raging river of death!! :-) But honestly I can't wait to move. I am ready for a change. :-)
 

Jonathan Smith
Nursing Foal
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 19
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 09, 2008 - 07:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Laurie

I have to say Ft. LW was nothing compared to ranger school at Ft. Benning and and later at Ft. Bliss. I don't think I have 20 hot meals the entire 9 weeks.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 115
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily: How's the water levels where you're at. Our boat sank in the pond today!! Water is everywhere again. Let me know how you're doing. I haven't heard from Cyndy lately...hope she is getting through these storms as well!

Jonathan: Sounds like army life is similar to marriage...hahahaha!
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 528
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 02:55 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, The creek was really high again but it is going down. When the storms hit hard this morning I watched Gracie on the cam from 5:00-6:00. Her behaviour didn't change much but with the storms thought I should watch. I ended up sleeping in until 9:30. I couldn't believe it. I guess with waking up and checking the cam all the time I was just tired. Of course I still checked on her all morning I just stayed in bed. :-) I know I am so lazy.
She has been taking long naps while lying down. And she has started biting at her stomach every once and awhile. Her bag isn't any bigger but it is getting harder.
Who knows. Today is day 341.

How is Moose doing??
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 118
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 03:06 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Moose has just done a complete turn-around. He is not just little stinker like his brother. Where did my sweet lil foal go?? Haha! He has the gallop down and loves to outmatch his mother's stride. He looks like a bull in a china shop.

I'm glad the creek is on the down fall. I still have Echo and Rhetti in the 7 acre field with the creek because everyone wants to eat her baby. Weirdest thing...poor thing found out that barbed-wire fences can't be run through. Freaked me right out when Blossom seperated him out from Echo and chased him through the fence! Thank goodness we only suffered a minor cut on a shoulder and a few punctures on the legs. I'm hoping that Echo doesn't take him across the creek and teach him how to swim the hard way. My goodness but he's not even a week old and he has had his share of education. (Last night he took off being a hotshot and went speeding full blast towards the fence again and I thought, oh no, here we go again. But he did a sliding sit stop a few feet from the fence, bounced up on all fours and was quite smug that he had just made me go into cardiac arrest.)

I would say that you are getting really close Emily. My mares took long daily naps for about a week before foaling. Their bags didn't get any larger either, just harder. And honestly, I kept checking for heat in them and I couldn't tell any difference. Their bags really didn't change in appearance and fill until after babies were here and then it was on the next day that you could see noticeable change.

You're entitled to being lazy. When this little one gets here you will really enjoy your first night of real sleep. Only then will you know how sleep deprived you really are.

I told my other half that I was waiting for Emily's foal to get here and if it didn't arrive soon I was gonna take a road trip to Dixon! See if I can rub off some of my foaling mojo on her.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 529
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 03:16 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I am glad to hear Moose is doing so well!!! And that Rhetti is okay.
I certainly hope I am close!! Gracie is so different from our last maiden who had milk for quite some time and then it changed to white the night she foaled. Why can't she do that. :-)
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 122
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 03:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily: Because it wouldn't be as much fun as watching you stress out!

Tim was right, with regard to Moose, its amazing what passing a little poo will do for the personality!

Maidens stress me out...I like my pro mares...so much easier on the nerves.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 531
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 06:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, Here are yesterdays pictures and todays. The difference I see is that her teats are now fuller and are pointing down.


340 side
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie340.jpg

341 side
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie341.jpg

340 udder
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie340U.jpg

341 udder
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie341U.jpg

Her udder was harder tonight then this morning and she felt much warmer to the touch tonight but wasn't sweating at all.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 532
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, April 10, 2008 - 06:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oh, did I tell you a couple of nights ago she was so uncomfortable that she gave a big buck. Poor thing.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 132
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 10:33 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily: Blossom was an "idiot" the last few days before foaling. She galloped, bucked, shook her head and acted like she an extremely overweight 2 year-old. From your pics, I'd say your waiting is almost over. I'm getting excited for you!
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 535
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 10:45 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks!!!! I am getting excited for me too!!

I'll probably take pictures again today just because as I get closer there are more and more changes. I have started keeping photo journals of my mares. It will make life a little easier the next time they foal. :-)
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 136
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Friday, April 11, 2008 - 10:59 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Keeping a journal, I think Tim or Jon mentioned that before, is a great idea. I did this with our cattle and it's very funny because they are consistent creatures. They even calve in the same place very year. It makes it much easier the next go around.
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 540
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 12:53 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey, Bobbi!!!
Didn't post any new pictures of yesterday. They didn't really look any different but her udder was a lot harder.
Anyway, I think we are on the home stretch!!!!! Last night I was able to get a few drops from each teat. It was clear maybe slightly cloudy. This morning it was cloudier and I was able get enough for a test. Her Calcium is still low but her pH level is between 6.2-6.4 . This should mean anytime!!!!!!!!!!!! I 'll keep you updated!!!

Emily
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 544
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 07:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Correction, her pH was more like 6.6 but is now 6.4 or below. I took a picture of the milk in the syringe so everyone could see the color.

http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie343M.jpg

Udder
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie343U.jpg

Side
http://i9.photobucket.com/albums/a97/pnhpaintlover/Gracie343.jpg
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1155
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 07:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily, you are sooooo close! I can't wait to see pics of the new foal!
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 546
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Saturday, April 12, 2008 - 07:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks, Tracy!!!! I don't think I will be getting much sleep tonight!!!
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 148
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 10:48 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily: Got any new pictures???? How's she doing?
 

Emily West, Gracie Due 04/11/08
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 550
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 11:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi!!!!! Go take a look under annoucements. There are new pictures there. :-)
 

Jo Angela Stirewalt
Breeding Stock
Username: Raknrydr

Post Number: 111
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 11:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim I read at the top of this post you said the average of your foals this year seems to be 122 lbs. also aren't most TB's big like in the 16h range ?

Well what I am getting at is we lost our foal last week, deflected hind foot & hip lock SEVERE.

I cannot seem to give up the notion that I got my mare to fat and her colt was to big which is what caused us to lose it.
I have a 16.2h TWH and the vet guessed our foal at a good 100-120lbs. she did have a harder than normal time just to get past the shouldes I think that took about 20-25 minutes to get that far and she was a maiden. What is your thoughts ?

Still blaming myself.
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 151
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 11:15 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jo...don't blame yourself. My TB is only about 15.3 and she had a 125lb foal. His leg,shoulder & hip locked but I was able to "help" with just sheer luck. I feel fairly confident that if she would have foaled during the day while I was at work and not on a weekend when I happened to be there, that I would be dealing with a less than ideal outcome. We had our own issues with baby being sucked back in and breathing in fluid. (See "Dummy Foal" stuff)

I think sometimes it is just structurally the way some mares are built. My other mare ripped herself from Africa to Antartica delivering hers so she obviously had major issues with being able to deliver her foal through the shoulders and hind quarters...and yet...she was all alone during her delivery.

I also think that some mares are just easier keepers than others. I have a really, really, really FAT mare who has (knock on wood) successfully delivered 4 foals without issue. I think, in my mind, you can have a seasoned mare that can always have issues or a maiden who has no problems. Sometimes we win and sometimes we lose.

Keep your chin up. Certainly as Tim/Jonathan have experienced...you can do everything possible and have a state of the art facility but sometimes nature takes it out of our hands.

We all love you Jo for being such a great horse mom! And you will have success...don't give up on yourself or your mare.
 

Jonathan Smith
Weanling
Username: Kynwatch

Post Number: 34
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jo

I agree with Bobbi! You can't blame yourself!!!! Some mares just have trouble foaling. We have had small mares push out large foals and large mares stuggle with a 100 pounder. She might be narrow through the pelvis or a 100 different things. If you did everything within your ability, you are an compassionate and caring owner. THAT IS ALL THAT CAN BE EXPECTED!!! Sometimes you can't win.

I don't own any of the mares we work with and I have shed a few tears on the battles lost. My second year I had to hold a 1 hour old foal that was being euthanized. It affected me so bad I almost left the foaling barn after that. I know there was nothing else that could be done.


When I stop caring that when I will leave!

(Message edited by kynwatch on April 13, 2008)
 

Tim Popovitz
Yearling
Username: Dystocia

Post Number: 52
Registered: 02-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 07:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jo

You simply can't save 'em all. You fight as hard as you can for as long as you can, and mother nature takes the rest.

Did nutrition cause this? Highly unlikely

Genetics probably played more of a role.


I read the post, your efforts were heroic. I've been there, trust me. Blaming yourself is part of process, but you can't let it dominate your thinking. I can't remember the names of all the healthy animals I've been responsible for, but you can bet I remember every detail of the ones I've lost. It is that list of names that motivates me to do my job the best I can, every night.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 130
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Sunday, April 13, 2008 - 09:18 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jo, I am so sorry things went sideways for you. It must feel awful, but I'm sure you did everything you could. Your post shows how much you cared. Others on this board have lost foals this season. Not much consolation I suppose, but you aren't alone. Please try not to blame yourself.
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1405
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 11:11 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jo Angela~I see a glimmer of hope as you still go through and analyze your loss. Good for you keep working on that grief..that is the only way through it. I promise thinks will get better. How is your lovely mare recoverying? A good ride when she is ready will be good for your soul...Hugs Jan
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 158
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 03:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Amen to everyone's comments! That's what makes us all horse people.

Question I am pondering during my lapse in maternity time...Will I be the ONLY foal-watcher for June?
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 159
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 03:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Can anyone tell me how I can put those week-old "turd" foals back and get those little sweet 24-hour-old babies back?
 

Jan Owen
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 1408
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 04:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi~I know that you will have company, I believe Tracy's mare is due in June and I believe Marilyn's mare is due in July. :-)
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 164
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 04:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Jan: Thank goodness! I was worried that I was the only crazy person who would have bred their mare so late in the season. Whew! Someone else will be out there with me as we gripe about how HOT & DRY it is...quite a change from our ramblings recently about how COLD & RAINY it is.
 

Tracy Smith, Tali due 6/08
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Tracys

Post Number: 1167
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Monday, April 14, 2008 - 09:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My mare is due beginning of June! :-) I will be going crazy with you and all these experienced foalers can give us advice!
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 168
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 10:37 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yea Tracy! I'm glad I'm in good company. So we're up to Lena and Tali. Marilyn will have to join us as well because Len'a due date is actually June 24th...and if its like these last two foals (who were due in March and came in April), I may be rolling over to July with Marilyn!
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 180
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 12:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Tim & Jonathan: Could you please go to "Foals First Week" and possibly address any issues you may have experienced with regard to foal rejection days or even weeks after foaling? I would appreciate any insight you may have on this.
 

Cjskip
Breeding Stock
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 142
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 02:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Bobbi, you've hung with us in the interim between your foals, so I'll do my best to try and remember to log on here and "keep you company!" Maybe you can tell me something about my little "turds," who might not be so sweet by then! LOL
 

Bobbi Govro
Breeding Stock
Username: Hh_farms

Post Number: 184
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Tuesday, April 15, 2008 - 03:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Cj: Thanks for keepin' me comp'ny through the hot, grueling months facing me. I'd really appreciate that! And we can all keep caught up with our foal challenges. Maybe Jos will put a new category on titled: "Foals We'd Like To Put Back After Foaling-Sucklings Anonymous"



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