MAIN PAGE
EQUINE REPRODUCTION ARTICLES
SHORT COURSES
OTHER SERVICES AVAILABLE FROM EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
FROZEN SEMEN STALLIONS
CERTIFIED SEMEN FREEZING LOCATIONS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION SUPPLIES
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BOOKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST
EASILY CALCULATE THE CORRECT VOLUME OF SEMEN AND EXTENDER TO SHIP OR USE ON FARM!
EQUINE REPRODUCTION BULLETIN BOARD
SITE MAP OF EQUINE-REPRODUCTION.COM
CONTACT US

horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
horse breeding
Go to the articles page
 
Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board
 
Topics Page Topics Page Register for a new account Register Edit Profile Profile Log Out Log Out Help/Instructions Help    
New Posts New Posts Last 1|3|7 Days Search Search Tree View Tree View  
Posting is restricted to registered board members only to prevent spamming of the board. We regret the necessity of this action, but hope you will appreciate the importance of the integrity of the board. Registration is free and information provided during the process will not be submitted to third parties.

Horrible problem with mare NEED ADVICE

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Horrible problem with mare NEED ADVICE « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

soraya myers
Neonate
Username: Soraya

Post Number: 1
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Friday, January 11, 2008 - 08:17 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have just reunited filly after 2 month weaning with mare. Its been a 3 days of heartbreaking hell. The mare wants nothing to do with the filly and the filly wants to be near the mare. You can imagine the problems. The mare is aggressive to the point of hurting the filly. I have kept them in adjacent pastures and they are fine as long as separated. I don't want to keep this separation as a permanent solution but I don't want the mare to hurt the weanling. The mare is pregnant and due in the next month or so. I'm hoping once the foal is born she will lose interest in hurting her filly. Can anyone explain to me whats going on. The rancher I purchased the broodmare and filly from assures me this is normal but I am having a hard time accepting that. He is a cutting horse trainer that is well known in Texas so I trust him but I am a soft hearted first time horse owner and it truly breaks my heart to see the filly pine for her mother. Does anyone have ANY advice?}}}
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 670
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Friday, January 11, 2008 - 08:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Is she agressive with other horses or just her filly? and how agressive is to the point of hurting her?
 

Paul Liberty
Weanling
Username: Sptxthrill

Post Number: 30
Registered: 11-2007
Posted on Friday, January 11, 2008 - 11:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Do you have another weanling you could put with your filly? or some kind of a 'buddy' for your filly? If your mare is due in the next month or so, and the mare is aggressive towards her filly, you really don't want to get that mare upset in her condition, it could cause problems for the 'new' foal. Is there anyway you can separate them further apart from each other?
 

Phyllis Schroder
Weanling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 28
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2008 - 12:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Chances are she's not going to get nicer t'wards her weaned filly but worse since she's going to get very protective of the new foal once it's born. I would do my best to find the youngster an entirely different buddy to hang out with.
I always wean my foals by placing them with my older gelding or mare who helps keep them company and makes things less stressful for the foals by having an older horse they can look up to and follow like mom.
As Paul mentioned, if you have another youngster she can stay with that'd be great or just an older quiet horse that you know they will be safe with.
Even if you could have a friend let their weanling, pony or older horse stay with her if you don't have one to use. This would be the best situation all around.
 

soraya myers
Neonate
Username: Soraya

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2008 - 02:29 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes, I have a three year old gelding that is with her. So you think this is a situation that isn't likely to change? The mare is dominent over the gelding too but isn't aggressive with him anymore. She used to pin her ears when food was around and he would back off. THey have established a pecking order. I was hoping I wouldn't have to keep them apart forever though. Is this common? Sorry for the stupid questions but I'm second guessing the cold turkey weaning I was told was the best. The seller told me this was the best way, separate mother and filly for two months and wean, then reuinite. The mare is a very strong and dominent personality. I just have never heard of a mare rejecting and HATING her foal like the way this one does. So this situation won't improve?
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 676
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, January 12, 2008 - 12:48 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It may improve over time how old is your filly? When you do try putting them together are you putting the gelding in as well?
 

soraya myers
Neonate
Username: Soraya

Post Number: 3
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Monday, January 14, 2008 - 01:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yes I do put the gelding in aswell. My last attempt was a little better. The mare and gelding went off to another pasture and left the filly. She doesn't do well on her own though and it was pitiful listening to her cry so I put the mare up. Does anyone have any advice on a better method of weaning or is this the most widely accepted way? The mare will foal in the next few weeks and I know I have time to figure it out but would love to hear everyone's opinions/advice.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 717
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, January 14, 2008 - 01:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i HAVE A SIMILAR SITUATION IN MY PASTURE WITH A FILLY I BOUGHT MY DAUGHTER. MY MINI IS HERD BOSS AND IS QUITE MEAN HONESTLY SHE GOES OUT OF HER WAY TO BOSS EACH ONE INDIVIDUALY. WHEN THE FILLY ,BEAUTY, IS OUT WITH MY APPY AND THE MINI ISNT THERE BUBBA IS A GOOD BIG BROTHER BUT WHEN NUGGET, THE MINI, IS OUT HE TOTALY IGNORES BEAUTY. IM HOPING WHEN NUGGET FOALS SHE WILL BE A LITTLE MORE PREOCCUPIED WITH HER BABY AND DO LESS BOSSING. I BOUGHT BEAUTY SEVERLY UNDER WEIGHT AT APROX 4-5 MONTHS OF AGE PULLED HER OFF OF A VERY SICK MOM COLD TURKEY SO IT WAS A DIFFICULT PROCESS FOR HER BUT WHEN THE OTHERS IGNORED HER I SPENT EXTRA TIME WITH HER. THIS SEAMED TO LIFT HER SPIRITS AND BELIEVE IT OR NOT WHEN NUGGET EXCAPES HER FOALING PEN SHES NICER TO BEAUTY. COLD TURKEY IS PROBABLY BEST BUT WHAT AGE ARE YOU WEANING AT?
 

Phyllis Schroder
Weanling
Username: Shadowbend

Post Number: 29
Registered: 08-2007
Posted on Monday, January 14, 2008 - 11:59 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Soraya,
It will eventually change but I think you are expecting it to do so to soon. Currently i would leave the filly with the gelding and preferably out of the mares sight entirely. 2mos. apart is not a long time.
Since the mare will be foaling soon she doesn't need to be stressed by the irritation of her previous filly. This can also be very stressful on the filly and cause problems.
I would wait until several weeks, a month, or more after her new foal arrives and then put them out in a pen next to the older filly and gelding and get a feel for how they interact over the fence and go from there with things.
Hopefully meantime the filly will become less concerned about getting back with mom,, and buddy up more with the gelding. This will also give the mare and new foal time to acquaint and the mare feel less defensive t'wards others about the new foal. Usually the first 2wks. after foaling (depends on mare) she will be very protective and leary of others in the herd getting to close to the new arrival.
Especially if the mare is at the top of the pecking order.
You've already taken the step to wean and seperate the mare and filly so you need to stick to your guns and make it as easy as possible by keeping them as far apart as possible and more or less forcing the filly to find a new friend in the gelding and forget about mom. It only makes it more stressful if she can see her mom or be in the same pasture with her.
When you feel she has forgotten about mom and is more content to hang with her gelding buddy than anyone else then the filly is probably ready to be in the same pasture with mom again.
And, don't mistake how the mare is acting to her current filly as hatred, she is only doing what is natural. She is expecting another foal and knows that so she has to wean her previous filly and keep her off her. I'm sure she may be quite aggressive about it at times but for the sake of her coming foal she has to.
Sorry this was so long, but hope all goes well. Just be patient.
 

Hayleigh Crompton
Neonate
Username: Hayleigh

Post Number: 2
Registered: 01-2008
Posted on Tuesday, January 15, 2008 - 07:12 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hi soraya im not sure what the norm is over there in the usa but here in new zealand alot of people either remove the mare from the foal/weanling and put her in a padock next to the foal so then they are still next to each other and can stay "friends" but the foal cant drink from the mare obviously and also by taking the mare away and not removing the foal from the padock he "knows" it wont be as stressful.

also you could try getting a donkey or a younger goat as a companion for the foal/weanling i hear that works REALLY well. esspecially a goat ause they eat all the "crap" tucker out of the padock and not "ALL" the grass like a donkey might do

i hope maybe this helps you out a bit



Please note that opinions, product information, advice or suggestions posted on this bulletin board are not necessarily those of the management at Equine-Reproduction.com nor does the maintenance of the post position indicate an implicit or any endorsement of that information, opinion or product.

Further, although we have the greatest respect for the posters offering assistance here, you are advised to seek a consultation with your veterinarian prior to using information obtained from this board if it is of a veterinary nature.

Proud to be sponsored and supported by:
IMV Technologies - makers of Equine AI Equipment
Equine A.I. Equipment Supplies
Universal Medical Systems Ultrasounds
For your Veterinary Ultrasounding Needs
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Hamilton Research Inc - Home of the Equitainer
Exodus Breeders Supply - Your one-stop shop for all your reproductive needs!
Exodus Breeders Supply
Har-Vet: An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products
An Industry Leader in Equine Veterinary Products!
Reproduction Resources: Specializing in Artificial Breeding and Embryo Transfer Supplies
Specializing in Artificial Breeding and ET Supplies
BET Pharm: Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
Your Compounding Pharmacy for Reproductive Needs!
www.SemenTanks.com - Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
Quality Tanks at Competitive Prices!
J.L. Smith Co. - Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
Safe, affordable breeding stocks!
  International Veterinary Information Service
International Veterinary Information Service
 

MAIN PAGE | INFORMATIONAL ARTICLES | SHORTCOURSES | SERVICES
FROZEN STALLIONS | FREEZING LOCATIONS | SUPPLIES | BOOKS | LINKS
EQUINE REPRODUCTION E-MAIL LIST | SEMEN CALCULATOR | BULLETIN BOARD
SITEMAP | CONTACT US