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Foals with Contracted Tendons

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Foals with Contracted Tendons « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Magic1
Neonate
Username: Magic1

Post Number: 3
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 09:52 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have posted this question on several sites and no one can answer it. I had two mares brought to my stallion to be bred. They both came from the same farm, but the mares are unrelated and were bred to unrelated stallions. Both of the foals have contracted tendons in the front legs and are "buck-kneed". The owner told me that the colt had received a shot and his legs seem to be getting straighter every day. The filly received nothing and seems to be getting even a little bow-legged now. My questions are: What kind of shot would be given for contracted tendons? What would cause both of these foals to have contracted tendons - could it be something lacking in the mares diet during pregnancy? I am really interested in finding the answers to these questions.
 

Pat Wiles
Nursing Foal
Username: Tajsultani

Post Number: 11
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Friday, June 03, 2005 - 11:56 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Contracted tendons can occur from lack of space in the uterus (large foal - or late foal). Some mares just seem to always throw foals that start that way - many never need help, it straightens itself out in a week or so, but some do of course. It could also be that the mares are missing something in their diet (rickets type condition?) I would be suspicious of this since both mares are from same farm, and unrelated. I am not sure what shot they gave him.

Bowlegged can also be caused by babies running on steep hills - they can start out straight, but due to constant pounding of legs on hard steep ground, the knees can bow out. Confining our foals in small paddocks with no hills, etc. for a few weeks straightened ours out.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10128
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, June 04, 2005 - 10:04 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Oxytetracycline is the "shot". It's an antibiotic, but for some reason one of the side-effects is relaxing the tendons in foals. It is generally not now used as a first line of defense, as another of the side-effects is kidney damage. Simply bandaging the foals legs can result in relaxation as well, and is probably a better [safer] place to start.
 

Kay Baxter
Neonate
Username: Kaykay

Post Number: 7
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 12:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The vets i have talked with about this say to never bandage or splint the legs. Every foal i have seen with this has straightened out on its own by just running and playing and by 2 weeks youd never know they had it. Im not sure what you mean though by buck kneed. Do you mean over at the knee? Best of luck to you
 

Rooty (Unregistered Guest)
Unregistered guest
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 02:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We've had a couple of foals with contracted tendons. One had a brace put on (his was a hind leg)and turned out fine. The other had both front legs contracted, with one worse than the other. They have both resolved with trimming and exercise.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Jos

Post Number: 10142
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Wednesday, June 08, 2005 - 10:27 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

There is really no generalised rule to splint/bandage/turn out or not splint/bandage/turn out. It needs to be decided on an individual case-by-case basis, as they will all tend to differ slightly. Minor cases will usually straighten up of their own accord without anything being done. Serious cases won't.

If in doubt best to consult with your vet and farrier!
 

Shades
Neonate
Username: Shades

Post Number: 2
Registered: 06-2005
Posted on Monday, October 10, 2005 - 12:58 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a filly that developed contracted tendons as a 4 month old. The vet gave meds & I stopped feed but nothing helped. I ended up doing surgery on the filly. She is now 11 years old and hasn't missed a beat. It was very nerve wracking though. I think this problem was due to no turn out during pregnancy as well as no turn out after foaling.
 

Cindy Moore
Neonate
Username: Chorse_1998

Post Number: 2
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Monday, October 10, 2005 - 08:42 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I can testify that no turnout is not your answer either. I had 2 foals that were born buck kneed this year - both mares were multiparous and had never had buck kneed foals before. This was the first year for my young stallion and I do not know if this condition came from him, as two other foals sired by him did not have buck knees. Both mares are in a 50 acre pasture and are turned out 24/7. After foaling in the pasture, both mares and foals were still turned out, 24/7. The filly seemed to get over hers faster than the colt, but both had straightened up by 1 month old. You cannot tell that they were buck kneed at birth now - one is 6 months old and the other is 5 1/2 months old. I was advised against using the "shot" as there were side effects - kidney damage and something about blowing a vein. Mine had 24/7/ turnout since birth and are doing well today.
Cindy}}}



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