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Foal kicks with hindlegs

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Foal kicks with hindlegs « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Corrie
Nursing Foal
Username: Corrie

Post Number: 17
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 03:02 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i have this young colt, he is reasonably behaved, except for his hindlegs, If I brush them he kicks at me. i can pick up his frontfeet, but not his hindfeet.
He is a month old, and very strong too. How do I teach him not to kick at me, and to let him pick up his hindfeet ?
I'm very worried, because he is going to be huge, and I really want him to behave a bit normal.
So please help.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 142
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 05:32 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Corrie- I would use the stiff part of a whip just to rub on his legs until he gets used to them being touched. Their legs are their only means of escape and defense so they aren't always thrilled about giving them over to being touched or held on to right away. My first measure would be to gradually work my way down his legs, forget the picking them up until you can touch them without him being concerned. Use the whip first though so that you don't get your head kicked in, when you can rub him all up and down his legs with that, then gradually use a brush or your hand to do the same, when you reach a spot that he acts "iffy" about, back off and work your way back up his leg. Then go back and do it again, in time he'll figure out you aren't going to hurt him and he'll relax, THEN you can work on asking him to let you pick that foot up.
 

Emily West
Breeding Stock
Username: Paintlover

Post Number: 176
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Tuesday, May 29, 2007 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Corrie,
I think Ev said it all. That was very good advice.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 143
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 01:10 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Emily- thanks, I've done it a time or two.. I'm just sharing what works for me. I've got one now that wants to bite though, he's an onery little cuss. With a name like Havoc, I don't know what I expected though.
 

Corrie
Nursing Foal
Username: Corrie

Post Number: 18
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 03:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks for the advice, I'll give it a go, I was already thinking of trying something like that, with a brush.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 147
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 30, 2007 - 04:01 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Corrie- Use a whip, you'll have less likelyhood of getting whacked in the head with a flying hoof. Just rub them gently all up and down his legs. When he stands and tollerates it well, take it away, if he puts up a fuss, just stay with him and continue to do it until he figures out it's not going to hurt him. Don't let him get the best of you, things like this are critical to having a well behaved horse later on, and if you think he's strong now... just wait a few more months.. Good luck. Ev
 

Kris Moos
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kris

Post Number: 1090
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 09:00 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

the most important thing is dont stop doing it when he kicks...otherwise he will learn that kicking is the "right answer" to get you to leave him alone.... you stop when he allows you to go as far as you wanted to without a fuss. if he kicks you just go back to doing what you were...I have had a couple light footed ones...it is frustrating...but i tell you what...it hurts much less now than in 6 months, and your farrier will thank you tremendously!!!!
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 150
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 09:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kris- no kidding. I feel the same about teaching them to stand tied, it's much easier at the 9 month to 12 month stage than waiting until they are full grown. Recent case at the barn where my horses were staying, BIG mare, Irish draft blood. No tying her up, she'd break everything you tied her with. She's been introduced to the "Clinton Anderson" halter (which does not break even with her strength) She's learning, but it sure would have been much easier and safer to do it when she was smaller, breaking a habit of breaking free will take a little more time in a horse her age as well.
 

Kris Moos
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kris

Post Number: 1094
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 10:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have one mare that was my first foal born to me and my mare...I never knew a horse needed to be taught to tie...so i never tied her till she was 2 i tried...she fought and broke free....and has repeatedly since...I now use a rope halter and the blocker tie ring and I have been ablt to get her to stand tied to a single post...forget a trailer or hitching post....but we are making progress...she hasnt gotten loose in 2 years!!! :-) Thats what happens when youre young and not too horse knowledgeable... so now I tell EVERYONE i know...teach them young!!! its MUCH easier!!!!
 

Corrie
Nursing Foal
Username: Corrie

Post Number: 19
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 02:19 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Well I'm progressing fine at the moment, his front feet are perfect to lift up now, and I get one of his hind feet up for a second. I'm allowed now to pet him all over his legs, so we are getting there.
How do you teach them to stand still to a post, I haven't tried that yet, so what is the best way to do it ?
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 345
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 02:37 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would tie mine with a quick knot (just in case) next to momma tied. She modeled great behavior. Then I would go about my business grooming etc. Never Never leave them unattended at this time. When he would pull back and stepped forward he would get the release of pressure and soon figured out that if he relaxed it was not problem. Little lessons at first and if he really got in his mind he was going to pull back I would tap with a crop on his hind end to encourage him to stand forward. As time went on he would get more and more time being tied up. I also used the hot walker as a tie up. When he was older (6 months) I would hook him up to the hot walker (not on) and let him work himself around and around and finally when he was standing nicely take him off. This works great as the grow up and I hook him up and work another horse near by and it teaches patience and that they don't get to "join" in with the other horse just because they want to. You sound like you are doing great.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 151
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 03:44 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

just be very careful about tying the little ones up fast, I've heard of broken necks from those who struggle violently. as a general practice we wait to tie them solid until they are about 6 months of age.
 

Jan Owen
Breeding Stock
Username: 1frosty1

Post Number: 346
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 04:09 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree Eve....never leave them that means not even to go get something from the tack room...I meant that I groomed them and stayed focus on them and always ended on a good note..catch 'em being good and reward..short little lessons but completely supervised.
 

Kris Moos
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Kris

Post Number: 1095
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 31, 2007 - 06:28 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

me too...now i teach them to tie at 3-6 months depending on the horse behavior...if they lead well and give to pressure well and are a calm horse i will start earlier...the stubborn or nervous ones wait... they are the fighters!
i just tie to an idividual post and USE A QUICK NOT...or hold the rope wrapped so it can be released quickley...then i groom baby or pet baby and if they back away i tap the rump to step forward...and yes end on a good note!
sounds like you are ding well now with his legs...congrats.
 

E Watkins
Breeding Stock
Username: Ev_watkins

Post Number: 153
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Friday, June 01, 2007 - 03:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Kris & Jan- aren't we smart? Just kidding, I've learned my lessons the hard way.. experience is a good teacher but sometimes a costly one.. sometimes though, folks have to find out the hard way, we have a few of those in the barn at any given time. I just shake my head and go on, I'll give unsollicited advice only once.. I hate to nag. I figure they can deal with the consequences and hope the horse doesn't get hurt in the process of their gaining experience.
 

Cjskip
Yearling
Username: Cjskip

Post Number: 52
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 07:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Okay-this is great info. Question-with a foal, would a bungy type cord be better? Or is it to strong for the little guys? I'd hate to see them go flying into the tie rail! Or is there any other technique that works better? Cross ties?

And as an aside, does ayone use hobbles? Someone had suggested them to me, but I am afraid the horse would be too off balance and if spooked, would really hurt themselves. Can someone enlighten me please? \
 

Kay B. Jones,Nova born 2/24
Breeding Stock
Username: Kaybjones

Post Number: 202
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Wednesday, April 02, 2008 - 10:41 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

E Watkins, what are you doing about the biter. Mines nipping at me and momma. Mommas biting him back, but I don't want to do that. I've thumped his muzzle and rubbed his nose a lot. I think he's getting the idea, he's mostly doing it when I'm picking up a hoof and my back is down. He's giving the hoof pretty well. We do it quickly EVERY DAY before he gets to go out to pasture. One place I read , requires every one who pets the foal has to pick up the feet before petting. We are now not going out to pasture till Nova goes with me and mom on a lead to the gate. I think he's making some connection, it may just be routine but routine establishes a habit. It gets to be second nature for both of us.



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