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Unfriendly foal

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Unfriendly foal « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Diana Dolan
Neonate
Username: Dee0926

Post Number: 2
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 08:34 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

My baby was born 12 days ago. He's perfect in every way except he will not let me near him. The mare could care less what I do as long as she can see him but he won't let me touch him or stand next to him. I go into the stall and just talk to him but nothing is changing so far.I was not at home when she had him. By the time I could get home he was at least three hours old.Does anyone have any suggestion? What about a book or web site for some advise? I would like him to be a friendly as his mother. But I'm a little disappointed.
 

Karen Lockhart
Nursing Foal
Username: Lockedheartsfarms

Post Number: 16
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 09:20 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

This is normal. Even with foals that are imprinted from birth. What I usually do is just spend time in the stall or pasture with them and mom. Squat down and just stay there, eventually curiosity will take over and he will investigate. Don't push yourself onhim, usually by the time they are a month old they get over the shyness and you can start to develop a relationship with them.
 

Colleen Beck
Weanling
Username: Gypsycreations

Post Number: 22
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 11:19 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Yep, I agree with Karen, squat down and be still. He'll get curious. For best results, do this several times a day until he approaches you readily. Then start gently scratching his withers and you've got a friend for life!
 

Lynn Ison
Breeding Stock
Username: Lynndi

Post Number: 139
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 02:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good advice ladies...thankyou !
I will store that for when I my foal arrives.
 

Mood Swings
Weanling
Username: Mood_swings

Post Number: 23
Registered: 12-2006
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 02:29 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I agree with Karen as well. Foals are an inquisitive bunch and eventually their curiousity gets the better of them. The more time you can spend with him the better whether you're in the stall or paddock. Give him lots of hugs and scratches :-)
 

Diana Dolan
Neonate
Username: Dee0926

Post Number: 3
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 06:08 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thank you everyone We will keep working at it!
 

Sabrina Japczyk
Weanling
Username: Sabrina

Post Number: 48
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Saturday, March 03, 2007 - 08:13 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diana- My foal will be two weeks old tomorrow...He is the same way. I did exactly what the other girls said, and it seems to be working. The other day, I sat down while they were eating and put some hay in my lap which he was interested in, and he came over and ate out of my lap...made me sooo happy, cause i was getting worried too. I had never had a foal act that way to me before. After that day, I can walk up to him in the field without him running to the other side of his mom. He LOVES his withers scratched...Yesterday, he sucked on a range cube out of my hand...I totally agree with squatting down...that seems to be the key...Hope all goes well...
 

dreamonthefly
Nursing Foal
Username: Dreamonthefly

Post Number: 19
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Sunday, March 04, 2007 - 02:31 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

my little (actually....quite strapping) colt was born on Feb 6. He pinned his ears at me for the first time Feb 7. I have never come across such an ANGRY foal before. He can wheel, kick and bite with the best of them. he needs extra time( and by time i mean handling). i handle his feet every day and i make sure that i actually expect more from him with respect to manners than i do with my other foals....he always leads in/out to pasture and is made to wait just a couple minutes longer than the rest before being able to gallop off. Handle handle handle. his attitude has definitely improved and he appreciated consistency and routine...so here's hoping.
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 56
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Tuesday, March 13, 2007 - 03:07 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We've had two like that, dreamonthefly. Nasty to humans from 24 hours old. One was really a big fellow, so his owner and her husband used to go in, pin him in the corner and scratch him until he was enjoying it. Took about 4 days of this, and he came around. My guy was a pony, so I could hang on to him and scratch him without a helper, but what really turned him around was scrubbing the foal scours off his bum. After the first time I did that he decided I was actually pretty cool, and the only time he ever even so much as pinned his ears at me after that was over his supper dish.
Both guys have turned out to have excellent temperaments!
 

Dianne Edwards
Breeding Stock
Username: Mamaedwards

Post Number: 178
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 10:32 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

We tried the squatting down and sitting near our 3month olds and you girls are right, both of them could not stand it. The friendly one came right over got his scratches then the shy one eventually saw she was enjoying it and had to come see too. She is still shy but we can actually touch her now without her running off. Thanks for the advice. Any advice on haltering them, I know I know, I should have already done it, but I didnt and dont want to ruin the progress we have made. Any tricks or techniques that have worked well for yall?
 

Tiffany Wright
Breeding Stock
Username: Wrightkoss

Post Number: 392
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 03:47 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Dianne - on a 3 month old that hasn't been haltered yet, you are going to have to do it like you are first breaking out a horse. My recommendation is to take the lead rope (preferrably tied to the halter no snaps) and take and drape it around their neck slowly so that you have a loop around their neck and then take and put that halter on them, just like you would any other horse. Don't let them pull away from you... you should be able to keep control with that loop around their neck. Do that OVER AND OVER AND OVER AND OVER again until you don't have to have the loop any more. Just go slow. You should be able to get it fairly quickly with that method.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 202
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 03:51 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diane - I would continue to rub and scratch but start rubbing their face over there eyes and nose when they are comfortable with that Tiffany's method will work very well.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 206
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 05:39 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

oh wanted to add make sure you are always standing to the side of your horseby the neck and shoulder this way they cant strike you or run you over if they panick.
 

Dianne Edwards
Breeding Stock
Username: Mamaedwards

Post Number: 183
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 05:43 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Thanks yall, I know I should have done it sooner, with Hubby gone it takes all I have to just keep everything going. The kids want to play and scratch but not do any real training.
 

Diana Dolan
Neonate
Username: Dee0926

Post Number: 4
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 07:05 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Good advise. I have been reading but still this little colt is not to happy to see me. The filly loves it and I talk to him as I touch her so that he can watch(which he does).Also one more question. The two week old filly's ( Lilly)mother is not very nice to the the little colt (Tonka). I' wonder if this all plays into what going on? Thanks for any advise or comments.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Breeding Stock
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 208
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 08:45 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Diana - I was given a 3 month old colt that had not been touched. He was not interested me no matter how much I talked or sat (which honestly i didnt have a lot of time for). So after 3 days of trying to be nice with no progress I roped the little fella. It took me about an hour to get him played out but finally he let me touch him slowly at first but I kept at him. It took about another hour but soon he had a halter on and I could touch him all over and pick up all four feet. I rubbed him all over till he looked like he was really enjoying then let him go. Next day I got him in the pen and had to rope him again but this time he stopped cold as soon as he was caught. He was a little nervous but stood and within 5min was totally relaxed I rubbed on him a bunch more and then started trying to lead him. once he started giving to the lead rope I took him with me all day just following me around the barnyard and even arounmd the yard. When I had to go somewhere he couldnt follow I just tied him up and came back to him when i could. After about 3 days he was an in my pocket horse. I didnt have a round pen available so thats how i did it.
You can also start round penning with him and it will help a lot with his attitude. I sugest Clinton Andersons method of round penning.
Yes if he is low man on the totem pole around there he can develope a sour attitude, and have a low confidance level. So all your love and bonding will do him wonders.
 

Ruth
Yearling
Username: Rooty

Post Number: 62
Registered: 07-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 21, 2007 - 05:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would not push the haltering on them until they are very confident with you. You've already waited this long, a little longer won't make much difference.
 

tracey phipps
Weanling
Username: Tracey_p

Post Number: 49
Registered: 04-2007
Posted on Wednesday, May 16, 2007 - 07:40 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have the opposite problem, my ten day old filly is too friendly if that is possible. I walk in the stall, she comes straight to me, she loves my two children, especially the 9 year old who is at eye level. She mouths me all the time, which I am trying to discourage - don't want to start bad habits.

Only problem I am having is keeping her in a paddock. Turned her in the round pen this morning, and she charged the panel, head between two rows. Didn't hurt her, but I am hoping it may have taught her a lesson.

We are moving her to a four strand electric tape paddock on Saturday, just hoping she will stay behind it. She is a handful - full of joy and wanting to run.

Do your foals stay behind and show respect to electric tape?
 

Suzanne Hopf
Neonate
Username: Suznhopf

Post Number: 5
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Friday, May 18, 2007 - 09:30 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I do like the electric tape for the foals, most learn to respect it very quickly. I actually prefer to use electrobraid, it is stronger and easier to put up. However, it is not as readily available as the tape, and little more money. Worth it in the long run, if you consider how much more durable it is and that the more difficult horses to contain wont be tearing it down. If you consider the time fixing tape that is torn down, or the cost of injuries if horses get into the wrong paddock, the extra expense of electrobraid pays off (at least in my book).

As for haltering, I have had to rope a few foals and prefer to do it in the stall. None of my foals have ever fought the rope very hard, and it was easy to get the halters on once they found out they could not pull away. I just snub them to a post, but don't WRAP the rope, just use the post as a pulley - that way I can play out the rope if they panic. Brains over brawn... and safety is paramount - I can play the rope out if the foal panics. They can't get very far in the stall anyway if I have to play the rope out.



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