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Foal Rejection

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Foaling and Immediate Post-foaling Issues » Foal Rejection « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

ginger widner
Neonate
Username: Gwarabians

Post Number: 1
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Monday, November 06, 2006 - 10:36 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

hello,
i am trying to get in touch with anyone out there familiar with foal rejection. A few years ago my arabian mare rejected her foal and she is rebred, i have heard that it is common in arabians and most of the time they accept the second foal. i am wondering if anyone has tips, there was a gal named pam smith on this site who seems to know what she was talking about (foal rejection) but i can't find her again. Any help would be great.
Thanks All}
 

Heather Kutyba
Breeding Stock
Username: Heatherck11

Post Number: 335
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, November 06, 2006 - 11:25 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hi Ginger,
I'm sure that there are others that have delt with foal rejection in a better capacity than I. With all fortune, it will stay that way! Thus far, my mares have been great, but I've been around mares owned by friends who've rejected their foals. I actually have the OPPOSITE problem....as I have a mare that will steal a foal in a NY minute...she doubles as a great surrougate/weaning mare, but can't be introduced to a foal until it's a little older w/out the threat of treading over the rightful momma and staking claiming :-).
The fact that your mare has had a foal rejected in the past may or may not leave her open for doing it again. I know mares that went on to be fine with subsequent foals, but others that followed suit...injuring/killing their newborns. The worst one I saw, the owners spayed her. That was after she killed her first foal, and attempted to do so by picking up and shaking her 2nd foal. They had their fill.
It is going to be paramount for her to be monitored when/during/after foaling. If she can't be monitored where she's at now, arrange for her to be moved 6-8 weeks ahead of time to an appropriate facility.
Talk to your vet and ask for recommendations. Make sure you have his/her numbers and other vets in the area who will be available in the event she does this again.
Have a good foaling kit/emergency kit ready, with restraint devices (twitch, stud chain). Have bales of hay nearby that you can makeshift a partition in the stall if necessary.
There are numerous articles online that can be accessed for basic information, but your vet or nearby university would be the best source of information.
Remembering that the best indicator of future behavior is past behavior. Prepare for the worst, but hope for the best.

On a brighter note, this is a different gestation and a new opportunity. How is she doing, and when is she due? Pic??
 

Leonard Kistner
Nursing Foal
Username: Len

Post Number: 11
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 11:21 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ginger, Some Arabians reject their first foals and then go on to be great mothers with the rest of their foals. In my experience,hearing what my wife Sandy has seen, Egyption Arabs are the most pron to rejection of foals. They are sometimes repete rejectors. Sandy has put Nursemares out at farms year after year for the same rejector mare. Some Arab farms have whole families of rejectors. They are great producers so they keep breeding them. She has supplied Nursemares for a farm here in NY that had Mother, daughters and grand daughters, all rejectors. There are other breeds that have their share of rejectors too. No matter what the breed of rejector,they need to be watched and watched some more during that second foaling. It can be very dangerious, trying to get a rejector to except it foal. People have been hurt and I mean serious hurt. While some people claim to know how to correct the problem of rejection They will be in the stall maybe for days befor they wear the mare down. The best way to handle a rejection is to get a Nursemare. The Nursemare is the only one that can corrct the problem with out any harm to the foal or to people. If the rejection is a miner problem of the maiden mare not understanding what has happened it can be corrected and should be given all the time she needs. That doesn't mean she needs a week. Most times its done in a matter of maybe an hour or so. There are rejectors and there are just mixed up mares that need help. Help needs to be gentle with soft spoken help. Use common sense. You will know the difference between the mixed up mare and the true rejector. The foal is what matters here so be prepared to act fast if there is aggression. Later
 

Cindy Moore
Weanling
Username: Chorse_1998

Post Number: 28
Registered: 05-2005
Posted on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 03:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)


It is amazing to
} me that Arab breeders would propagate this behaviour. Thes}}}e horses are so special that you would keep 3 generations around that are known foal rejectors? Sounds crazy to me, as I have a family that is known for their great mothering instinct. If one of my mares was a 2 time rejector, she would not be here for the 3rd time.}}}
 

Leonard Kistner
Nursing Foal
Username: Len

Post Number: 12
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Saturday, December 16, 2006 - 04:34 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

In a lot of cases Cindy is right.Then there are other cases where the rejector is a producer of winners. Now say its TBs were talking about and that mare is a true rejector. Her offspring is always in the money. Winning races. Her rejection is delt with. A Nursemare is ready to take her foal as soon as its born. She goes out to pasture after shes bred. Arabs have show horses that are constant winners,the same thing. Other breeds also have winners and their mares are rejectors. Rejectors are not uncommon.
 

Jodi Maki
Neonate
Username: Mysteryarabpt

Post Number: 7
Registered: 01-2007
Posted on Monday, January 15, 2007 - 03:11 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Ok I owned a Mini that I bought from a Lady I know. Any how the year the lady had a foal out of the mare she rejected it big time. She kicked at it & bit it. Couple years later when I owned her I bred her and she was a great mom. She since has had 4 foals since rejecting the first one.

Another story friend I know had Arabian mare that she bred and that mare rejected the foal. Couple years later I buy the mare decided to breed her thinking she maybe fine second time around. Oh man she was not fine at all. She tried to kill the filly. So my friend took the mare back and used her for a riding horse. Well one day her stallion got out of his pasture and in with the mares, which included that mare. Well my friend went racing out and got him back into his pen. She hoped and hoped he did not breed any of the mares. Well 11 and half months later sure enough that same mare gave birth to a colt. Same thing tried to kill him. My friend has since sold that mare to a girl that never plans to breed her.

So you never know. Some times it can be one time thing. But some mares are rejectors and are just not ment to have foals. I think of it this way not every woman wants to have a child. So why should every animal want to.
 

Jenni Luttrell
Weanling
Username: Bugrace2000

Post Number: 29
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 02:49 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

You have no way of knowing if she will reject this baby or love it. My advice keep a close but distant eye on her. let her go through everything on her own and see if she gets it up and nursing; be close enough if she decides to kill it you can prevent it. I would hope and pray for the best but have some colostrum and a bottle handy. If she rejects the foal you can try to coax her to take it by rubbing her scent all over the baby and trying to re intraduce it to her. If she still refuses its not nessasarly to late. keep baby smelling like her and if possible place it in a stall next to her where she can see it and smell it often but not hurt it. Keep her milked out and she may take to it in a couple of days. Its not a guarantee but worth a shot if a nursemare isnt readily available
 

Kris Moos
Breeding Stock
Username: Kris

Post Number: 947
Registered: 01-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 09:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have an arab mare(egyptian) that tried to reject her first foal, kicking at it, running from it, pushing it, and ontop of all of it the foal was a "dummy foal", so we tranqed her tied her nose into corner, milked her out, fed baby, then waitied till she got up and let her find it herself. after about 6 hours of being tranqed and tied she was fine and has since had 2 others with minimal problems (i say minnimal because she is a overly protective momma, keeps baby in corner or in her site so she spins cirlces to see the foal and makes it hard for the foal to nurse, so we have to back her inot a corner or a fence to stop her) so not all firt time rejectors are lifetime rejectors! heres hoping shell be fine! good luck, and defineately BE THERE!!!!
 

G.Bosscher
Neonate
Username: Fawazee

Post Number: 1
Registered: 02-2007
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 10:35 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hello Ginger,I have had some experience with rejected foals,try closing them in totally(no other horses or people around - keep them quiet
ask your vet about tranq.some maiden mares do act
as you explained but I don't think it is a breed
gender.I just had a mare foal and it also rejected her filly,she had been a maiden last year,this was a very tough foaling which I believe contributed to the problem I was up all night and finally the filly fed herself without
the mare trying to kick her or keeping moving off.Sometime time cures all.good luck
 

Megan A Brown
Breeding Stock
Username: Fabmeg

Post Number: 202
Registered: 04-2006
Posted on Monday, February 26, 2007 - 04:58 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have a mare that has had 13 foals, 12 colt and 1 filly. Best mama ever to her colts, tried to kill her filly. Filly was foal number 12. Horses do stupid things.
 

Dianne Edwards
Yearling
Username: Mamaedwards

Post Number: 68
Registered: 03-2006
Posted on Tuesday, February 27, 2007 - 10:17 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I had a maiden mare foal in Nov, 6yr old, she was scared of her foal. She would not even let it get close to her, she would bolt to the other end of the pen when it came close, after 2 hours I decided I needed to feed it. When I tried to get in the pen she decided she didnt want me to have it. She charged me and went into protective mode, shortly after she fed it herself. Boy was I glad, all this at 3AM. She is not as attentive as my other two moms, lets it roam farther away from her and it has to keep up with her instead of her keeping up with it, but she takes care of it.
 

Carol Krauss
Neonate
Username: Cadence

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2007
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 12:38 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have 2 maidens in foal and I have concerns about one mare who came to me with doubtful previous handling by people. She used to be angry, then she settled and is quite friendly to me and then because she was an exceptionally conformed and athletic mare, I had her bred. Is there a way to tell in advance if a mare is going to be (a) a rejector, or (b) dangerous to humans around her foal? I would rather start making extra precautions now rather than be stuck in the middle of the night with a serious situation.
 

cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 134
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 02:28 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I have never had a rejection problem once the foal nurses. I just keep a twitch and some tranquilizer handy just in case. If a mare is iffy I first just lip chain and watch then if still a problem I give the sleepy shot and twitch.
 

dreamonthefly
Weanling
Username: Dreamonthefly

Post Number: 22
Registered: 06-2006
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 08:38 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

i have a maiden that foaled one month ago. she took very well to him, he nursed no problem...she was content to be in for the day with him. since then she has become quite ugly at feeding time. it started about a week after he was born. she does not generally allow him to eat with her. she's ok outside with hay etc, but will go at him ears pinned and open mouthed at hay time in her stall. she has kicked him at feeding time, she has put him into the boards and she does bite him. she always allows him to nurse and hasn't "rejected" him altogether, but she has no concern when she is away from him.it's up to him to go stay close to her if he wants to. i do hope she evens out her temperment with him once she's in foal again. any thoughts ?
 

cathy Cook
Breeding Stock
Username: Razmacat

Post Number: 138
Registered: 08-2005
Posted on Wednesday, March 14, 2007 - 10:03 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I would highly consider seperating them at feed time.
 

ginger widner
Neonate
Username: Gwarabians

Post Number: 2
Registered: 11-2006
Posted on Thursday, May 17, 2007 - 05:54 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Hey,
Well My mare is due anytime now and boy am i nervous. Is a tranq. diffent than a sedative? Do you guys think that maybe it was because there were too many people around? Will keep you posted on what happens. Planning on just standing back and letting her deal with it, and going in if neccesary.



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