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Foal heat after mare aborted?

Equine-Reproduction.com Bulletin Board » Abortion and Pregnancy Loss » Foal heat after mare aborted? « Previous Next »


Author Message
 

Mid-western
Nursing Foal
Username: Midwestern

Post Number: 13
Registered: 04-2010
Posted on Wednesday, February 15, 2012 - 09:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

If a mare aborts 7 weeks before the "due date" will she have a foal heat?
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 3478
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 10:23 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

It will depend upon several things, not the least of which is what time of year it happens. In some cases mares my simply (if the timing is applicable) go into winter anestrus.
 

Mid-western
Nursing Foal
Username: Midwestern

Post Number: 14
Registered: 04-2010
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 02:46 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

The mare aborted last week (Feb. 9, 2012) and everything had gone like clockwork prior to her loosing the foal. The foal was not positioned correctly and was coming front legs back and the top of the head (ears) first. The vet was able to re-position the foal so we could get it out entact without having to do a C-section. It took an hour and thirty-five minutes to get it out. The foal was already dead before, but we are not sure how long it had been dead in the mare. The mare passed her placenta 45 minutes after the dead foal was out, so she didn't retain it very long. Put her on antibiotics and used Oxytocin to help her clear the uterus. He lavaged her the next day with 3 liters saline solution and an antibiotic...the return was clear after the third litre. She seems to have returned to normal now. Could she be having a foal heat? We live in southern Indiana and we have had a very mild winter. Temperatures now are in the 40's if that makes any difference?

(Message edited by midwestern on February 16, 2012)
 

Holly
Senior Stallion or Mare
Username: Bonny

Post Number: 2457
Registered: 03-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 09:35 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

Sorry to hear about your mare, and the loss of your foal.
 

Brenda Weddle
Breeding Stock
Username: 3_horses

Post Number: 208
Registered: 10-2008
Posted on Thursday, February 16, 2012 - 10:14 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I, too, am so sorry about your foal and your mare. It is so very hard to lose a baby.
 

Kristen B.
Weanling
Username: Kristen_b

Post Number: 45
Registered: 06-2010
Posted on Friday, February 17, 2012 - 11:05 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I'm so sorry about your foal and thankful that the mare is OK. The weather really doesn't matter much, it depends on how long it is light outside. When days start getting longer mares begin to cycle, which is why you can put them under lights at night and expect them to begin cycling earlier in the year.
 

Susan Barta
Neonate
Username: Pniranch

Post Number: 2
Registered: 03-2012
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2012 - 02:01 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I was in AZ visiting my parents and my mare aborted her foal at 288 days due to placentitis as was diagnosed by the second vet I got someone to take her to. The first vet told my horse sitter to give her 10cc's of oxytocin which she did and I about fell over when I heard that. The mare was down for hours after that and is there any reason for that large of a dose as I have never heard of that. Also this was March 6th so would she come into a foal heat? She is now being treated with uniprem powder and did drop the placenta later that afternoon after that oxytocin wore off. This mare has had ten foals with immediate cleaning while she was still lying down and has gotten back in foal with one dose of semen first try eveytime even when one year the semen was 20% so she is a very prolific mare and this is the first time she has ever had a problem. I had a horse sitter come out three times a day that watched her closely and caught the abortion. She is 21 years old, no caslicks and a Progesterone level of 6.4 avg over 3 days when tested between 30-33 days multiple times per day so any suggestion as to where to go from here and also thoughts on the 10cc's of Oxy????
We have just moved her to Colorado so went on the recommendation of a person we know for the first vet who would not even see the mare and said she could be brought in later but when was called had his wife call back and say he was not available to work (at 6pm??) I had her taken to Countryside in Greeley CO and I am very happy with their facility and surgical center and will continue to use them but I sure want to know what other people thought of this oxytocin issue??
 

Cathy
Breeding Stock
Username: Cathy

Post Number: 378
Registered: 04-2005
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2012 - 09:44 am:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

10cc of Oxytocin is a cattle dose, It is also used to help relieve choke. In any case a new vet was in order. That large of a dose in a mare will cause the uterus to cramp down and not release.
Sorry she and you had to go through that.
 

Jos
Board Administrator
Username: Admin

Post Number: 3488
Registered: 10-1999
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2012 - 12:20 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

is there any reason for that large of a dose Veterinarian incompetence. Change vets and report the old one to the Vet Board. Particularly if the vet did not examine the mare, but made the recommendation over the 'phone. (OK - I just read the rest of your post - definitely report them to the Vet Board. Refusal to attend - especially after a screw-up - is a major issue).

would she come into a foal heat? Same answer as to the same question above. Maybe! :-)

where to go from here A complete breeding soundness examination, possibly including an endometrial biopsy. Think of the uterus as a car tire (:-)). The more miles it has on it, the more wear and less tread remains. The same can be said for the uterus that's held a lot of foals. There is more likelihood of damage and changes and that may affect placental attachment. Additionally, as placentitis was an issue, evaluation of the cervix is warranted to ensure cervical competency - damage from a prior foaling may affect that negatively, thereby allowing pathogenic access to the uterus and the sequela of placentitis. Progesterone levels are rarely an issue (we don't even test routinely, as it's a waste of money).

Depending upon the results of the BSE you may decide - particularly if the biopsy score is III - not to rebreed the mare, or at least not to spend a lot of money in the stud fee as there is an increased risk of pregnancy failure or lack of pregnancy establishment. Having said that, we have got many older mares pregnant and kept them that way, but it often requires more intensive breeding work to achieve.
 

Susan Barta
Neonate
Username: Pniranch

Post Number: 3
Registered: 03-2012
Posted on Saturday, March 10, 2012 - 01:02 pm:   Edit Post Delete Post    Move Post (Moderator/Admin Only)

I will definitely report the vet to the board but it will be my word against his I'm afraid. I am taking the mare in Tues to have a complete exam and biopsy. Thank you for the response and I will follow your instructions Jos. Very much appreciated :-)



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